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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. Search the whole document.

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John Slidell (search for this): chapter 4.16
ent by my commander to arrest Mr. Mason and Mr. Slidell and their secretaries, and send them prisons possessed with the idea that Mr. Mason or Mr. Slidell, or both, would urge Captain Moir to relinq had taken me on board. I was anxious that Mr. Slidell and Mr. Mason should not leave any of their luggage behind. Mrs. Slidell having asked me who commanded the San Jacinto, I replied, Your old ac's offer of his cabin was conveyed by me to Mrs. Slidell and Mrs. Eustis, and declined by both ladiee in waiting, I notified both Mr. Mason and Mr. Slidell that the time had come to send them to the one of the London illustrated papers, that Miss Slidell, for some cause or other, had struck me in was talking to Mrs. Slidell at the door of Mr. Slidell's state-room. While I was standing there, Miss Slidell, then a girl of 15 or 17 years, was protesting against my taking her father from her, wbalance, and thus she touched me slightly. Mrs. Slidell, writing afterward from Paris to her near r[9 more...]
Innis N. Palmer (search for this): chapter 4.16
ly began privateering operations. She was a screw steamer of 500 tons, and was armed with 5 guns — an 8-inch pivot, and 24-pound howitzers. She cruised for two months in the Caribbean Sea and along the coast of South America, receiving friendly treatment and coaling without hindrance in the neutral ports. During the succeeding two months she cruised in the Atlantic. On the night of the 23d of November, she ran out of the port of St. Pierre, Island of Martinique, eluding the Iroquois (Captain Palmer), which had been sent to search for her. At Gibraltar, having been effectually blockaded by the Tuscarora, she was sold, afterward becoming a blockade runner. Among the vessels sent in search of her were the Niagara, Powhatan, Keystone State, Richmond, and San Jacinto. In his volume, The blockade and the Cruisers (Charles Scribner's Sons), Professor J. R. Soley sums up her career thus: During her cruise she had made 17 prizes, of which 2 were ransomed, 7 were released in Cuban po
Charles Wilkes (search for this): chapter 4.16
particularly of England and France. When Captain Wilkes first took me into his confidence, and tolaimed the right to board the mail-packet. Captain Wilkes fully expected that I would tender my serv very respectfully, your obedient servant, Charles Wilkes, Captain. To Lieutenant D. M. Fairfax, U. Jacinto, I replied, Your old acquaintance, Captain Wilkes ; whereupon she expressed surprise that hest uproar had subsided, I sent the boat to Captain Wilkes to say that these gentlemen were all on bory stores, which the paymaster's clerk, at Captain Wilkes's order, had already purchased from the stescorted each commissioner to the Rear-Admiral Charles Wilkes. From a photograph. side, and assit on board the San Jacinto and reported to Captain Wilkes that I had not taken the Trent as a prize,character; for everything had been done by Captain Wilkes and his officers to make them feel at homeannot close this narrative without saying that Wilkes was one of our very best officers, a man of st[17 more...]
Raphael Semmes (search for this): chapter 4.16
Captain Wilkes's seizure of Mason and Slidell. D. Macneill Fairfax, Rear-Admiral, U. S. N., Executive Officer of the San Jacinto. In October, 1861, the United States screw-sloop San Jacinto, of which Captain Charles Wilkes was commander and the writer was executive officer, on her return from the west coast of Africa, touched at the island of St. Thomas to coal ship. Here for the first time we learned of the presence in those waters of the Confederate cruiser Sumter (Captain Raphael Semmes). The Sumter, one of the first, if not the very first, of the regularly commissioned vessels of the Confederate navy, left New Orleans on the 18th of June, 1861 (see cut, p. 14), and, running the blockade, almost immediately began privateering operations. She was a screw steamer of 500 tons, and was armed with 5 guns — an 8-inch pivot, and 24-pound howitzers. She cruised for two months in the Caribbean Sea and along the coast of South America, receiving friendly treatment and coaling wit
prepared to board the steamer Trent, now hove to under our guns. On boarding her you will demand the papers of the steamer, her clearance from Havana, with the list of passengers and crew. Should Mr. Mason, Mr. Slidell, Mr. Eustis, and Mr. McFarland be on board, you will make them prisoners and send t hem on board this ship immediately, and take possession of her as a prize. I do not deem it will be necessary to use force, that the prisoners will have the good sense to avoid any necesnew very well, also came up at the same time, thus relieving me from Captain Moir's refusal, which was very polite but very positive, that I could not under such circumstances be shown any list of passengers. I asked where their secretaries, Mr. McFarland and Mr. Eustis, were, for I wanted to see them also, and Mr. Mason pointed them out to me standing near. In the briefest time I had the four gentlemen before me, and then I informed Captain Moir that I had been sent by my commander to arrest
S. P. Chase (search for this): chapter 4.16
ports, the capture would seriously inconvenience innocent persons and merchants; so that I had determined, before taking her, to lay the se matters before him for more serious consideration. I gave my real reasons some weeks afterward to Secretary Chase, whom I met by chance at the Treasury Department, he having asked me to explain why I had not literally obeyed Captain Wilkes's instructions. I told him that it was because I was impressed with England's sympathy for the South, and felt that she would be glad to have so good a ground to declare war against the United States. Mr. Chase seemed surprised, and exclaimed, You have certainly relieved the Government from great embarrassment, to say the least.--D. M. F. I returned immediately to the Trent and informed Captain Moir that Captain William H. Seward, Secretary of State. From a Daguerreotype taken about 1851. Wilkes would not longer detain him, and he might proceed on his voyage. The steamers soon separated, and t
Comte Paris (search for this): chapter 4.16
ng there, Miss Slidell, then a girl of 15 or 17 years, was protesting against my taking her father from her, when a little roll of the steamer caused her to lose her balance, and thus she touched me slightly. Mrs. Slidell, writing afterward from Paris to her near relative, and a friend of mine, expressed her mortification that such a story should have been circulated. But Commander Williams bade me good-bye pleasantly when I left the Trent, saying that he was very much pleased at my moderate from the first, that England would immediately demand their release, and that our Government would be obliged to accede to this demand. When Mr. Slidell was leaving the side of the Trent, he said to his wife, Good-bye, my dear, we shall meet in Paris in 60 days. If I remember aright, he was but 20 days longer in rejoining her. After the war I had a conversation with Captain Moir, in the presence of an English chaplain, at St. Thomas. Captain Moir was there in command of a large steamer r
November 30th (search for this): chapter 4.16
g fleet off Charleston, to Fort Monroe. Here report of the seizure was made, and the vessel was ordered to New York, and thence, by order of Secretary Seward, to Fort Warren, Boston harbor, where the prisoners were confined during the diplomatic correspondence which followed. The commissioners expressed their satisfaction at the considerate treatment which they received, both from Captain Wilkes during the voyage and from Colonel Justin Dimmick, the commander at Fort Warren. On the 30th of November, Earl Russell, the British minister for foreign affairs, having received the news of the seizure through a letter from Commander Williams (mentioned above), wrote to Lord Lyons, the British minister at Washington, reciting the circumstances and saying in part: Her Majesty's Government, therefore, trust that when this matter shall have been brought under the consideration of the Government of the United States, that Government will, of its own accord, offer to the British Government
route to England. He immediately put to sea, October 26th, with the purpose of intercepting the blockade runner which had brought them out. The commissioners were to have left Charleston by the cruiser Nashville, but their plans had been changed, and the steamer Gordon, otherwise known as the Theodora (Captain Lockwood), had been substituted. They had run the Union blockade successfully during a storm on the night of October 11th, and had arrived at Nassau on the 13th, and at Havana on the 17th. There we ascertained that their plan was to leave on the 7th of November in the English steamer Trent for St. Thomas oil their way to England, and readily calculated when and where in the Bahama Channel we might intercept them. Meanwhile, on the 2d of November, Captain Wilkes continued his cruise after the Sumter along the north coast of Cuba, also running over to Key West in the hope of finding the Powhatan or some other steamer to accompany him to the Bahama Channel to guard against the
November 2nd (search for this): chapter 4.16
eamer Gordon, otherwise known as the Theodora (Captain Lockwood), had been substituted. They had run the Union blockade successfully during a storm on the night of October 11th, and had arrived at Nassau on the 13th, and at Havana on the 17th. There we ascertained that their plan was to leave on the 7th of November in the English steamer Trent for St. Thomas oil their way to England, and readily calculated when and where in the Bahama Channel we might intercept them. Meanwhile, on the 2d of November, Captain Wilkes continued his cruise after the Sumter along the north coast of Cuba, also running over to Key West in the hope of finding the Powhatan or some other steamer to accompany him to the Bahama Channel to guard against the possibility of the escape of the commissioners. But the Powhatan had left the day before, and the San Jacinto therefore returned alone to the channel to await the Trent. Here, 240 miles from Havana, and 90 miles from Sagua la Grande, where the channel contr
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