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Hanover Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ed to the left and started for Williamsburg. Near the site of the White House See page 886, volume II. he met and skirmished with Confederate cavalry, and being repulsed, he inclined still more to the left, crossed the Pamunkey and Mattapony, and reached Gloucester Point without further interruption. Gregg and Buford had, meanwhile, been raiding in the neighborhood of the South Anna, closely watched by Hampton and Fitzhugh Lee. They burnt — the bridges in their march. Dashing upon Hanover Junction, they destroyed the railway property there, and damaged the road. Finally the whole of Stoneman's command, excepting the forces under Kilpatrick and Davis, was concentrated at Yanceyville, when it marched northward, crossed the Rapid Anna at the Raccoon Ford, and on Friday, the 8th of May, recrossed the Rappahannock at Kelly's Ford. Much property had been destroyed during the raid, but the chief object of the expedition, namely, the effectual destruction of Lee's communications with R
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
attle of Chancellorsville, 33. Lee takes Chancellorsville, 34. the Heights of Fredericksburg captut, in the light of huge bonfires, reached Chancellorsville on the afternoon of the 30th in excellentrossing the Rappahannock, he pushed on to Chancellorsville, where, in the spacious brick mansion of he put Jackson's column in motion toward Chancellorsville. It joined Anderson's (which, as we have mile in advance of the National works at Chancellorsville its cavalry met the vanguard of the Confesite Fredericksburg, and the main army at Chancellorsville, was thereby shortened at least twelve miOrange plank road, four miles westward of Chancellorsville. At the same time Lee was attracting thed sweeping over the dusty clearing around Chancellorsville in the wildest confusion, in the directiotion, his men rushed down the road toward Chancellorsville, and charged heavily upon the National liof V or redan shape, along the Ruins of Chancellorsville. this is a view of the ruins of the Ch[35 more...]
Todd's Tavern (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
broken and scattered. While the movements on Hooker's right were so successfully performed, his left wing, under Sedgwick, composed of his own corps (Sixth), and those of Reynolds (First), and Sickles (Third), had as successfully masked Todd's Tavern. this is a view of Todd's Tavern, as it appeared when the writer sketched it, in June, 1866. it was also the Headquarters of General Warren, and other officers, when the army under Grant was in that vicinity, in the spring of 1864. the mTodd's Tavern, as it appeared when the writer sketched it, in June, 1866. it was also the Headquarters of General Warren, and other officers, when the army under Grant was in that vicinity, in the spring of 1864. the movement, for Lee, while watching the visible enemy in front of him, was not aware of the passage of the Rappahannock by the turning column, until the three corps were on their way toward the Rapid Anna. Taking position a little below Fredericksburg, Sedgwick caused pontoon bridges to be laid on the night of the 28th, April, 1863. and before daylight Brooks's division crossed near the place of Franklin's passage, See page 489, volume II. and captured and drove the Confederate pickets there.
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
hich lay in the way of his crossing the Nansemond, there narrow and sinuous. For this purpose batteries were erected under cover of darkness, and opened upon them in broad daylight, which seriously wounded the little warriors afloat, but did not drive them far from the scene of conflict. And right gallantly did that little detachment of the National navy perform its part, and most usefully assist the land troops in a siege which continued twenty-four days. Longstreet recalled Hill from North Carolina, and the besiegers numbered about forty thousand. Gallant achievements were almost daily performed by both parties, To General Getty was intrusted the river line below Onondaga battery (see map on page 42), the key of the position, extending about eight miles in length. During the siege General Getty stormed and carried, with the Eighth Connecticut and Eighty-ninth New York, aided by Lieutenant Lamson and the gun-boats, a Confederate battery on the west branch of the Nansemond. He
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
capture or disperse the National garrison, and then, without further difficulty, seize Portsmouth and Norfolk, and seriously menace, if not actually Operations of Major General J. J. Peck commanding at Suffolk, Va. And vicinity. endanger Fortress Monroe. His first care was to conceal the facts of his own presence and his strength in numbers (then increased), and to weaken Peck's command. It was reported that he had gone to South Carolina, and D. H. Hill was sent to attack Little Washington, and menace New Berne, in North Carolina, for the purpose of drawing some of the troops at Suffolk and at Fortress Monroe in that direction, while the bulk of Longstreet's army was in readiness along the Blackwater, and on the railway between Suffolk and Petersburg, for an immediate advance. Longstreet thought his plan was working well, when spies informed him that General Foster, the successor of Burnside, See page 315, volume II. had ordered Peck to send three thousand soldiers to opp
Suffolk, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ginia.--battle of Chancellorsville.--siege of Suffolk. Position of the Army of the Potomac fortifications there, 41, 42. the siege of Suffolk by Longstreet, 43. Peck's defense of Suffolkngstreet driven away services of the Army at Suffolk, 44. While a portion of the National troopagainst General J. J. Peck in the vicinity of Suffolk, on the south side of the James River, and otps operating against General John J. Peck, at Suffolk. Ever since the Confederates lost Norfolk, ng body of National soldiers was stationed at Suffolk, at the head of the Nansemond River, and upons of Major General J. J. Peck commanding at Suffolk, Va. And vicinity. endanger Fortress Monroe. Hng the Blackwater, and on the railway between Suffolk and Petersburg, for an immediate advance. n pontoon bridges, and made a forced march on Suffolk April 1863. with about twenty-eight thousands that you were enabled to hold Longstreet at Suffolk. It has been asserted that Longstreet join[8 more...]
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ere achieving important. victories on the banks. of the Lower Mississippi, See the closing chapter of volume. II. those composing the Army of the Potomac were winning an equally important victory, July, 1863. not far from the banks of the Susquehannah, We left that army in charge of General Joseph Hooker, after sad disasters at Fredericksburg, encamped near the Rappahannock; Page 497, volume II. let us now observe its movements from that time until its triumphs in the conflict at Gettysburg, between the Susquehannah and the Potomac rivers. During three months after General Hooker took command of the army, no active operations were undertaken by either party in the strife, excepting in some cavalry movements, which were few and comparatively feeble. This inaction was caused partly by the wretched condition of the Virginia roads, and partly because of the exhaustion of both armies after a most fatiguing and wasting campaign. The Army of the Potomac, lying at Falmouth, near
National (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
in the morning? General Warren, Hooker's senior engineer officer, and others, were in favor of the offensive. Hooker preferred the defensive attitude, and the latter was chosen. Preparations for a struggle in the morning were then made. The National line extended from the Rappahannock to the Wilderness Church, two miles west of Chancellorsville. Meade's corps, with a division of Couch's, formed the left; Slocum's and a division of Sickles's the center, and Howard's the right, with Pleasanrday, he soon had thirty pieces of artillery in position there, and playing with destructive effect upon his antagonist. With a courage bordering on desperation, his men rushed down the road toward Chancellorsville, and charged heavily upon the National line fronting westward, composed of the corps of Sickles and the divisions of Berry and French, the last two supported by the divisions of Whipple and Williams. A severe struggle ensued. The right of the Confederates pressed back the Nationals
Moss Neck (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ed to fight. He Ford near Falmouth. this is a view of the Rappahannock just above Falmouth, as it appeared when the writer sketched it, in June, 1866, looking from the south side of the stream. The river is shallow here, with a rocky bottom, and broken by rocky islands. Near the white building seen on the left was Hooker's Headquarters tent (see page 24), at near the close of April. The river is always fordable here at low water. had called Stonewall Jackson's large force up from Moss Neck and its vicinity when Sedgwick made his demonstration, and now, with his army well in hand, from Hamilton's Crossing, on the railway, to the Rappahannock near the ford just above Falmouth, he determined to strike Hooker immediate and vigorous blows. His object was twofold: First, to secure the passage of the river at Banks's Ford, and thus widen the distance between Sedgwick and the main army; and, secondly, to compel Hooker to fight in his disadvantageous position at Chancellorsville, wh
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
d to march with an overwhelming force, cross the Nansemond, capture or disperse the National garrison, and then, without further difficulty, seize Portsmouth and Norfolk, and seriously menace, if not actually Operations of Major General J. J. Peck commanding at Suffolk, Va. And vicinity. endanger Fortress Monroe. His first care was to conceal the facts of his own presence and his strength in numbers (then increased), and to weaken Peck's command. It was reported that he had gone to South Carolina, and D. H. Hill was sent to attack Little Washington, and menace New Berne, in North Carolina, for the purpose of drawing some of the troops at Suffolk and at Fortress Monroe in that direction, while the bulk of Longstreet's army was in readiness along the Blackwater, and on the railway between Suffolk and Petersburg, for an immediate advance. Longstreet thought his plan was working well, when spies informed him that General Foster, the successor of Burnside, See page 315, volume I
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