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Charles B. Dahlgren (search for this): chapter 29
idge had command of the naval battery on the right wing in General Sherman's corps. This battery was worked with marked ability, and elicited the warmest praises from the commanding general. One thousand shells were fired into the enemy's works from Lieutenant-Commander Selfridge's guns. His services being required up the river, I relieved him a few days before the surrender, and Lieutenant-Commander Walker supplied his place and conducted the firing with the same ability. Acting-Master Charles B. Dahlgren was ordered to report to General McPherson for duty, and was assigned the management of the 9-inch guns, which were admirably served. Acting-Master Reed, of the Benton, had charge of the batteries at Fort Benton-so named by General Herron in honor of the occasion. General Herron generously acknowledged the services of those I sent him, which communication I enclose with this report. I have endeavored to do justice to all who were immediately engaged in the struggle for t
Robert Sherman (search for this): chapter 29
ksburg, July 4, 1863. meeting of the officers of the Army and Navy on board the flag-ship Black Hawk. letters from General Sherman to Admiral Porter. generous terms granted the besieged after the capture of Vicksburg. true history. harmony in Aushed up the river as near as she could get to the combatants, and it was soon discovered by the aid of glasses that General Sherman's division was coming in on the left of Snyder's Bluff, cutting off the enemy at that place from joining the troops he Yazoo to open communication with the Army. In three hours, letters were received by the Admiral from Generals Grant, Sherman and Steele, informing him of their complete success in driving General J. E. Johnston away with his Army of 40,000 men, ehind in hopes of carrying off a quantity of stores, but they were driven away by the DeKalb and were cut off by some of Sherman's command who had marched in that direction. The Confederates had been so completely surprised by the sudden appearan
James M. Prichett (search for this): chapter 29
berland and Tennessee Rivers, and have shown themselves to be most able officers. I feel no apprehension at any time with regard to movements in that quarter. Had it not been for the activity and energy displayed by Lieutenant-Commander Fitch, Captain Pennock and Lieutenant-Commander Phelps, General Rosecrans would have been left without provisions. To Captain Walke, Commander Woodworth, Lieutenant-Commanders Breese, Foster, Greer, Shirk, Owen, Wilson, Walker, Bache, Murphy, Selfridge, Prichett, Ramsay and Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant Hoel, I feel much indebted for their active and energetic attention to all my orders, and their ready co-operation with the Army corps commanders, at all times, which enabled them to carry out their plans successfully. The Benton, Lieutenant-Commander Greer, Mound City, Lieutenant Byron Wilson, Tuscumbia, Lieutenant-Commander Shirk. Carondelet, Acting Lieutenant Murphy, and the Sterling Price, Commander Woodworth, have been almost constantly under
James A. Greer (search for this): chapter 29
tivity and energy displayed by Lieutenant-Commander Fitch, Captain Pennock and Lieutenant-Commander Phelps, General Rosecrans would have been left without provisions. To Captain Walke, Commander Woodworth, Lieutenant-Commanders Breese, Foster, Greer, Shirk, Owen, Wilson, Walker, Bache, Murphy, Selfridge, Prichett, Ramsay and Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant Hoel, I feel much indebted for their active and energetic attention to all my orders, and their ready co-operation with the Army corps commanders, at all times, which enabled them to carry out their plans successfully. The Benton, Lieutenant-Commander Greer, Mound City, Lieutenant Byron Wilson, Tuscumbia, Lieutenant-Commander Shirk. Carondelet, Acting Lieutenant Murphy, and the Sterling Price, Commander Woodworth, have been almost constantly under fire of the batteries at Vicksburg since the forty-five days siege commenced. The attack of the 22d of May, by the Benton, Mound City, Carondelet and Tuscumbia on all the water batter
John Walsh (search for this): chapter 29
the enemy and an expedition under Lieutenant-Commander Walker of the DeKalb was sent up that river to capture or destroy them. The Forest Rose, Linden, Signal and Petrel (vessels whose names have appeared frequently in this history) accompanied the expedition. The Signal knocked down her chimney among the trees the first night, and had to return. Walker pushed on with the smaller vessels (leaving the DeKalb to follow after) to within fifteen miles of Fort Pemberton, where the steamers John Walsh, Lockwood, Golden age and Scotland were found sunk on a bar, completely blocking the way. Failing in his efforts to make a passage through the boats, he set fire to them and they were all destroyed. The expedition was attacked at this point by artillery and sharp-shooters in force, but they were driven off with loss. Saw-mills were burned, the corn on which an enemy could subsist was destroyed, and at Yazoo City the crews landed and brought away all the bar, round and flat iron intende
D. D. Porter (search for this): chapter 29
Departments. The plans for the capture of Vicksburg from the first to the last were arranged by General Grant and Admiral Porter. and carried out to the end with that unanimity of purpose which always leads to success. General Grant never und harmony of action prevailed which probably never was obtained in any other military and naval co-operation. Grant and Porter were of assimilated rank, and neither could give an order to the other; therefore it was only through that high courtesy from the naval part of the expedition to capture Vicksburg. In his reminiscences of the war, he says: The Navy under Porter was all it could be during the entire campaign. Without its assistance the campaign could not have been successfully mad him, as will appear from the following letter written after the surrender of Vicksburg. [detailed report of Acting-Rear-Admiral Porter.] U. S. Mississippi Squadron, Flag-Ship Black Hawk, off Vicksburg, July 13, 1863. Sir — I have made re
the aid of glasses that General Sherman's division was coming in on the left of Snyder's Bluff, cutting off the enemy at that place from joining the troops in the city. The DeKalb, Lieutenant-Commander Walker, the Choctaw, Lieutenant-Commander Ramsay, the Linden, Romeo, and Forest Rose, all under the command of Lieutenant-Commander Breese, were now sent up the Yazoo to open communication with the Army. In three hours, letters were received by the Admiral from Generals Grant, Sherman and Steele, informing him of their complete success in driving General J. E. Johnston away with his Army of 40,000 men, and forcing Pemberton into Vicksburg with about the same number of troops. In the meantime the DeKalb pushed on to Haines' Bluff, which had been the great obstacle to our advance in that direction, and which the enemy had commenced evacuating the day before. A part of the garrison had remained behind in hopes of carrying off a quantity of stores, but they were driven away by the D
T. O. Selfridge (search for this): chapter 29
been left without provisions. To Captain Walke, Commander Woodworth, Lieutenant-Commanders Breese, Foster, Greer, Shirk, Owen, Wilson, Walker, Bache, Murphy, Selfridge, Prichett, Ramsay and Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant Hoel, I feel much indebted for their active and energetic attention to all my orders, and their ready co-operat for any service. When the Army called on the Navy for siege guns, I detailed what officers and men I could spare to man and work the batteries. Lieutenant Commander Selfridge had command of the naval battery on the right wing in General Sherman's corps. This battery was worked with marked ability, and elicited the warmest praises from the commanding general. One thousand shells were fired into the enemy's works from Lieutenant-Commander Selfridge's guns. His services being required up the river, I relieved him a few days before the surrender, and Lieutenant-Commander Walker supplied his place and conducted the firing with the same ability. Acti
T. G. Herron (search for this): chapter 29
les B. Dahlgren was ordered to report to General McPherson for duty, and was assigned the management of the 9-inch guns, which were admirably served. Acting-Master Reed, of the Benton, had charge of the batteries at Fort Benton-so named by General Herron in honor of the occasion. General Herron generously acknowledged the services of those I sent him, which communication I enclose with this report. I have endeavored to do justice to all who were immediately engaged in the struggle for theGeneral Herron generously acknowledged the services of those I sent him, which communication I enclose with this report. I have endeavored to do justice to all who were immediately engaged in the struggle for the mastery of the Mississippi. To the Army do we owe immediate thanks for the capture of Vicksburg; but the Army was much facilitated by the Navy, which was ready at all times to co-operate. This has been no small undertaking. The late investment and capture of Vicksburg will be characterized as one of the greatest military achievements ever known. The conception of the siege originated with General Grant, who adopted a course in which great labor was performed, great battles were fought and g
John Miller (search for this): chapter 29
ell like hail among them. This floating battery completely enfiladed the enemy s batteries and rifle-pits in front of General Sherman, and made them untenable. The mortar-boats were under charge of gunner Eugene Mack, who for thirty days stood at his post, the firing continuing night and day. He performed his duty well and merits approval. The labor was extremely hard, and every man at the mortars was laid up with sickness, owing to excessive labor. After Mr. Mack was taken ill, Ensign Miller took charge and conducted the firing with marked ability. We know that nothing conduced more to the end of the siege than the mortar firing, which demoralized the rebels, killed and wounded a number of persons, killed the cattle, destroyed property of all kinds, and set the city on fire. On the last two days we were enabled to reach the outer works of the enemy by firing heavy charges of twenty-six pounds of powder; the distance was nearly three miles, and the falling of shells was ver
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