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Alfred Ellet (search for this): chapter 29
pt was made on Milliken's Bend, and quite a number of the garrison killed, but the gun-boats Choctaw and Lexington went immediately to the relief of our troops and the Confederates were driven off with loss The Marine Brigade under Brigadier-General Alfred Ellet had joined the squadron and reported to Admiral Porter. This organization consisted of about two thousand men, well equipped and fairly disciplined. General Mower, a very brave officer, had about 8,000 men at Young's Point, and unituty well. The banks of the Mississippi were so watchfully guarded from Vicksburg to Cairo that the Army transports went through with troops and stores, for a distance of about 450 miles, without molestation. The marine brigade, under Brigadier-General Ellet, was constantly landing along the river to break up guerilla warfare. Without a watchful eye on the Mississippi, on the part of the Navy, the operations of the Army would have been often interrupted. Only one Army steamer was disabled
ks that we cease to think of them as of any importance, though there has been much gallantry displayed on many occasions. Lieutenant-Commanders Phelps and Fitch have each had command of the Cumberland and Tennessee Rivers, and have shown themselves to be most able officers. I feel no apprehension at any time with regard to movements in that quarter. Had it not been for the activity and energy displayed by Lieutenant-Commander Fitch, Captain Pennock and Lieutenant-Commander Phelps, General Rosecrans would have been left without provisions. To Captain Walke, Commander Woodworth, Lieutenant-Commanders Breese, Foster, Greer, Shirk, Owen, Wilson, Walker, Bache, Murphy, Selfridge, Prichett, Ramsay and Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant Hoel, I feel much indebted for their active and energetic attention to all my orders, and their ready co-operation with the Army corps commanders, at all times, which enabled them to carry out their plans successfully. The Benton, Lieutenant-Commander Gre
J. H. Hurd (search for this): chapter 29
for such a purpose. His long range guns have done most excellent service at different times. I beg leave to mention the different commanders of the light draughts who have carried out my orders ders promptly, aided in keeping guerillas from the river, convoyed transports safely, and kept their vessels in good condition for service, viz: Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant George W. Brown, commanding Forest Rose; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant C. Dominey, commanding Signal; Acting-Volunteer Lieutenant J. H. Hurd, commanding Covington; Ensign Win. C. Hanford, commanding Robb; Acting-Master J. C. Bunner, commanding New Era; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant John Pierce, commanding Petrel; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant J. V. Johnstone, commanding Romeo; Acting-Master W. E. Fentress, commanding Rattler; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant T. E. Smith, commanding Linden; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant E. C. Brennan, commanding Prairie Bird; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant J. Goudy, commanding Queen City. There are oth
ns have done most excellent service at different times. I beg leave to mention the different commanders of the light draughts who have carried out my orders ders promptly, aided in keeping guerillas from the river, convoyed transports safely, and kept their vessels in good condition for service, viz: Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant George W. Brown, commanding Forest Rose; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant C. Dominey, commanding Signal; Acting-Volunteer Lieutenant J. H. Hurd, commanding Covington; Ensign Win. C. Hanford, commanding Robb; Acting-Master J. C. Bunner, commanding New Era; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant John Pierce, commanding Petrel; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant J. V. Johnstone, commanding Romeo; Acting-Master W. E. Fentress, commanding Rattler; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant T. E. Smith, commanding Linden; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant E. C. Brennan, commanding Prairie Bird; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant J. Goudy, commanding Queen City. There are others who deserve commendation, but these
I. Mcarthur (search for this): chapter 29
command around to the right of my position, to support a portion of his troops who had gained a lodgment in the enemy's works. I arrived, however, too late, and have now been ordered back to my former position and to follow up any advantage your vessels may gain. I have made a request to have some rifle guns sent me, which I require, and on receipt of which I expect to enfilade Whistling Dick's position; at any rate I will try. . . . . . . . . . . . . I am, your obedient servant, I. Mcarthur, Brig.-Gen. Com'ding 6th Division, 17th Corps. Had Gen. McArthur been let alone, and not been prevented from occupying the works from which the Navy had driven the Confederates, he would have kept possession of every fort on the ridge of hills which overlooked Vicksburg, and decided the fate of the city. To show that these attacks of the gunboats were not child's play, the reports of some of the injuries received by them are herewith mentioned: Mound City, May 22d, 1863. A
James W. Shirk (search for this): chapter 29
and energy displayed by Lieutenant-Commander Fitch, Captain Pennock and Lieutenant-Commander Phelps, General Rosecrans would have been left without provisions. To Captain Walke, Commander Woodworth, Lieutenant-Commanders Breese, Foster, Greer, Shirk, Owen, Wilson, Walker, Bache, Murphy, Selfridge, Prichett, Ramsay and Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant Hoel, I feel much indebted for their active and energetic attention to all my orders, and their ready co-operation with the Army corps commanders, at all times, which enabled them to carry out their plans successfully. The Benton, Lieutenant-Commander Greer, Mound City, Lieutenant Byron Wilson, Tuscumbia, Lieutenant-Commander Shirk. Carondelet, Acting Lieutenant Murphy, and the Sterling Price, Commander Woodworth, have been almost constantly under fire of the batteries at Vicksburg since the forty-five days siege commenced. The attack of the 22d of May, by the Benton, Mound City, Carondelet and Tuscumbia on all the water batteries, in
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 29
n the left of Snyder's Bluff, cutting off the enemy at that place from joining the troops in the city. The DeKalb, Lieutenant-Commander Walker, the Choctaw, Lieutenant-Commander Ramsay, the Linden, Romeo, and Forest Rose, all under the command of Lieutenant-Commander Breese, were now sent up the Yazoo to open communication with the Army. In three hours, letters were received by the Admiral from Generals Grant, Sherman and Steele, informing him of their complete success in driving General J. E. Johnston away with his Army of 40,000 men, and forcing Pemberton into Vicksburg with about the same number of troops. In the meantime the DeKalb pushed on to Haines' Bluff, which had been the great obstacle to our advance in that direction, and which the enemy had commenced evacuating the day before. A part of the garrison had remained behind in hopes of carrying off a quantity of stores, but they were driven away by the DeKalb and were cut off by some of Sherman's command who had marched
C. Hanford (search for this): chapter 29
most excellent service at different times. I beg leave to mention the different commanders of the light draughts who have carried out my orders ders promptly, aided in keeping guerillas from the river, convoyed transports safely, and kept their vessels in good condition for service, viz: Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant George W. Brown, commanding Forest Rose; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant C. Dominey, commanding Signal; Acting-Volunteer Lieutenant J. H. Hurd, commanding Covington; Ensign Win. C. Hanford, commanding Robb; Acting-Master J. C. Bunner, commanding New Era; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant John Pierce, commanding Petrel; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant J. V. Johnstone, commanding Romeo; Acting-Master W. E. Fentress, commanding Rattler; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant T. E. Smith, commanding Linden; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant E. C. Brennan, commanding Prairie Bird; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant J. Goudy, commanding Queen City. There are others who deserve commendation, but these seem to be t
from the commanding general. One thousand shells were fired into the enemy's works from Lieutenant-Commander Selfridge's guns. His services being required up the river, I relieved him a few days before the surrender, and Lieutenant-Commander Walker supplied his place and conducted the firing with the same ability. Acting-Master Charles B. Dahlgren was ordered to report to General McPherson for duty, and was assigned the management of the 9-inch guns, which were admirably served. Acting-Master Reed, of the Benton, had charge of the batteries at Fort Benton-so named by General Herron in honor of the occasion. General Herron generously acknowledged the services of those I sent him, which communication I enclose with this report. I have endeavored to do justice to all who were immediately engaged in the struggle for the mastery of the Mississippi. To the Army do we owe immediate thanks for the capture of Vicksburg; but the Army was much facilitated by the Navy, which was ready
Byron Wilson (search for this): chapter 29
ilroad iron and the whole to be covered with bags of earth — a fort, in fact, impervious to shot or shells. Lieutenant-Commander Wilson, in the Mound City, appeared below Warrenton about the 12th of May, and seeing these works and no persons abouhat General Grant's Army was not far off, and that he was driving Pemberton into the Lieut.-commanding (now captain) Byron Wilson, U. S. N. city. The flag-ship pushed up the river as near as she could get to the combatants, and it was soon discovet without provisions. To Captain Walke, Commander Woodworth, Lieutenant-Commanders Breese, Foster, Greer, Shirk, Owen, Wilson, Walker, Bache, Murphy, Selfridge, Prichett, Ramsay and Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant Hoel, I feel much indebted for their which enabled them to carry out their plans successfully. The Benton, Lieutenant-Commander Greer, Mound City, Lieutenant Byron Wilson, Tuscumbia, Lieutenant-Commander Shirk. Carondelet, Acting Lieutenant Murphy, and the Sterling Price, Commander
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