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Col. S. Jones, Chief of Artillery and Ordnance; Major Cabell, Chief Quarter-master; Capt. W. H. Fowle, Chief of Subsistence Department; Surgeon Thos. H. Williams, Medical Director, and Assistant Surgeon Brodie, Medical Purveyor of the General Staff attached to the army of the Potomac, were necessarily engaged, severally, with their responsible duties at my Headquarters at Camp Pickens, which they discharged with an energy and intelligence for which I have to tender my sincere thanks. Messrs. McLean, Wilcoxen, Kincheloe, and Brawner, citizens of this immediate vicinity, it is their due to say, have placed me and the country under great obligation for the information relative to this region, which has enabled me to avail myself of its defensive features and resources. They were found ever ready to give me their time, without stint or reward. Our casualties, in all 68 killed and wounded, were fifteen Including two reported missing. killed and fifty-three wounded, several of w
Neale Green (search for this): chapter 114
ed in the first and second sections of the paper herewith, marked A, on the morning of the 18th of July, my troops resting on Bull Run, from Union Mills Ford to the Stone Bridge, a distance of about eight miles, were posted as follows: Ewell's brigade occupied a position in vicinity of Union Mills Ford. It consisted of Rhode's 5th and Siebel's 6th regiments of Alabama, and Seymour's 6th regiment of Louisiana volunteers, with four 12-pounder howitzers, of Walton's battery, and Harrison's, Green's and Cabell's companies of Virginia cavalry. D. R. Jones' brigade was in position in rear of McLean's Ford, and consisted of Jenkins' 5th South Carolina, and Bunt's 15th and Fetherstone's 18th regiments of Mississippi volunteers, with two brass 6-pounder guns of Walton's battery, and one company of cavalry. Longstreet's brigade covered Blackburn's Ford, and consisted of Moore's 1st, Garland's 11th and Crose's 17th regiments Virginia volunteers, with two 6-pounder brass guns of Walton'
ed more coolness and energy than is usual among veterans of the old service. General Longstreet also mentions the conduct of Captain Marey, of the 17th Virginia volunteers, as especially gallant on one occasion, in advance of the Ford. The regiments of Early's brigade were commanded by Colonel Harry Hays, and Lieutenant-Colonels Williams and Hairston, who handled their commands in action with satisfactory coolness and skill, supported by their field officers, Lieut.-Col. DeChoiseul and Major Penn, of the 7th Louisiana, and Major Patton, of the 7th Virginia Volunteers. The skill, the conduct, and the soldierly qualities of the Washington Artillery engaged were all that could be desired. The officers and men attached to the seven pieces already specified, won for their battalion a distinction which, I feel assured, will never be tarnished, and which will ever serve to urge them and their corps to high endeavor. Lieutenant Squires worthily commanded the pieces in action. The com
Daniel Tyler (search for this): chapter 114
ed firm and determined. I now reported to Gen. Tyler that the main body of the New York regiment rought forward, comprising only a portion of Gen. Tyler's brigade, were here halted for rest, and re men ought not to have been sent against it. Gen. Tyler, formerly of the U. S. Army, is an officer on of the old Big Bethel and Vienna affairs. Gen. Tyler, however, says that it was only a reconnoissield, with trees at its rear. By this house Gen. Tyler advanced and made his observations. The ski main road, and was apparently unsupported. Gen. Tyler said: What can you do with them, Capt. Brackn; but if you say the word, I'll take them. Gen. Tyler then sent orders back for the advance of ther, where they were secluded from the enemy. Gen. Tyler returned to meet the artillery, which was rast rifle cannon was sighted by Lieut. Upton, Gen. Tyler's aid, and the shell fell plump amid the prirode through storms of shot unconcerned, and Gen. Tyler with his staff stood for an hour in the most[10 more...]
D. R. Jones (search for this): chapter 114
marked A, on the morning of the 18th of July, my troops resting on Bull Run, from Union Mills Ford to the Stone Bridge, a distance of about eight miles, were posted as follows: Ewell's brigade occupied a position in vicinity of Union Mills Ford. It consisted of Rhode's 5th and Siebel's 6th regiments of Alabama, and Seymour's 6th regiment of Louisiana volunteers, with four 12-pounder howitzers, of Walton's battery, and Harrison's, Green's and Cabell's companies of Virginia cavalry. D. R. Jones' brigade was in position in rear of McLean's Ford, and consisted of Jenkins' 5th South Carolina, and Bunt's 15th and Fetherstone's 18th regiments of Mississippi volunteers, with two brass 6-pounder guns of Walton's battery, and one company of cavalry. Longstreet's brigade covered Blackburn's Ford, and consisted of Moore's 1st, Garland's 11th and Crose's 17th regiments Virginia volunteers, with two 6-pounder brass guns of Walton's battery. Bonham's brigade held the approaches to Mitc
tts 1st to enter the woods, from which tile firing proceeded. They immediately started forward, under Lieut.-Col. Wells, the respective companies being led by Capt. Carruth and Lieut. Bird. As they climbed the rail fence which divided the woods from the open field, they were joined by two Fire Zouaves, the record of whose hardy eted no stand here, although their force was the stronger. As they ran in a body over the hills, three or four men appeared to linger and level their pieces at Capt. Carruth's company. The captain, believing that they might be friendly skirmishers, ran swiftly in among them, crying, Now, then, who are you? It turned out that he gf the rebels, upon whom they showered their rifle-shots. The main body, however, remained hidden in masked batteries. Renewed volleys brought down the men of Capt. Carruth's company by half dozens, although Capt. Adams' men escaped without loss. Capt. Adams' company, however, rendered the most effective service at this point by
Edwin D. Morgan (search for this): chapter 114
on occupied by Gen. Ewell's brigade, if necessary, could have been maintained against a largely superior force. This was especially the case with the Fifth Alabama volunteers, Colonel Rodes, which that excellent officer had made capable of a resolute, protracted defence against heavy odds. Accordingly, on the morning of the 17th ult., when the enemy appeared before that position, they were checked and held at bay, with some confessed loss, in a skirmish in advance of the works, in which Major Morgan and Capt. Shelly, Fifth regiment Alabama volunteers, acted with intelligent gallantry; and the post was only abandoned under general but specific imperative orders, in conformity with a long-conceived, established plan of action and battle. Capt. E. P. Alexander, Confederate States engineer, fortunately joined my Headquarters in time to introduce the system of new field-signals which, under his skilful management, rendered me the most important service preceding and during the engageme
William Moore (search for this): chapter 114
sippi volunteers, with two brass 6-pounder guns of Walton's battery, and one company of cavalry. Longstreet's brigade covered Blackburn's Ford, and consisted of Moore's 1st, Garland's 11th and Crose's 17th regiments Virginia volunteers, with two 6-pounder brass guns of Walton's battery. Bonham's brigade held the approaches toht his brigade into position, and subsequently into action, with judgment; and at the proper moment he displayed capacity for command and personal gallantry. Col. Moore, commanding the 1st Virginia volunteers, was severely wounded at the head of his regiment, the command of which subsequently devolved upon Major Skinner, Lieut. twice shot, mortally wounded. Brigadier-General Longstreet, while finding on all sides alacrity, ardor and intelligence, mentions his special obligations to Cols. Moore, Garland, and Corse, commanding, severally, regiments of his brigade, and to their field-officers, Lieut.-Cols. Fry, Funsten, and Munford, and Majors Brent and
W. H. Fowle (search for this): chapter 114
er aides-de-camp, Colonels Preston, Manning, Chestnut, Miles, Chisholm, and Heyward, of South Carolina, to all of whom I am greatly indebted for manifold essential services in the transmission of orders on the field, and in the preliminary arrangements for occupation and maintenance of the line of Bull Run. Col. Thomas Jordan, Assistant Adjutant-General; Capt. C. N. Smith, Assistant Adjutant-General; Col. S. Jones, Chief of Artillery and Ordnance; Major Cabell, Chief Quarter-master; Capt. W. H. Fowle, Chief of Subsistence Department; Surgeon Thos. H. Williams, Medical Director, and Assistant Surgeon Brodie, Medical Purveyor of the General Staff attached to the army of the Potomac, were necessarily engaged, severally, with their responsible duties at my Headquarters at Camp Pickens, which they discharged with an energy and intelligence for which I have to tender my sincere thanks. Messrs. McLean, Wilcoxen, Kincheloe, and Brawner, citizens of this immediate vicinity, it is their d
ven back by our skirmishers and Longstreet's reserve companies, which were brought up and employed at the most vigorously assailed points at the critical moment. It was now that Brigadier-General Longstreet sent for reenforcements from Early's brigade, which I had anticipated by directing the advance of Gen. Early, with two regiments of infantry and two pieces of artillery. As these came upon the field the enemy had advanced a third time with heavy numbers to force Longstreet's position. Hay's regiment, 7th Louisiana volunteers, which was in advance, was placed on the bank of the stream, under some cover, to the immediate right and left of the ford, relieving Corse's regiment, 17th Virginia volunteers; this was done under a heavy fire of musketry, with promising steadiness. The 7th Virginia, under Lieutenant-Colonel Williams, was then formed to the right, also under heavy fire, and pushed forward to the stream, relieving the 1st regiment Virginia volunteers. At the same time, t
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