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th two 6-pounder brass guns of Walton's battery. Bonham's brigade held the approaches to Mitchell's Ford; it was composed of Kershaw's 2d, Williams' 3d, Bacon's 7th and Cash's 8th regiments South Carolina volunteers; of Shields' and Del Kemper's batteries, and of Flood's, Radford's, Payne's, Ball's, Wickman's and Powell's companies of Virginia cavalry, under Col. Radford. Cocke's brigade held the Fords below and in vicinity of the Stone Bridge, and consisted of Wither's 18th, Lieutenant-Colonel Strange's 19th, and R. T. Preston's 28th regiments, with Latham's battery and one company of cavalry, Virginia volunteers. Evans held my left flank and protected the Stone Bridge crossing, with Sloane's 4th regiment South Carolina volunteers, Wheat's Special Battalion Louisiana volunteers, four 6-pounder guns and two companies of Virginia cavalry. Early's brigade, consisting of Kemper's 7th, Early's 24th regiment of Virginia volunteers, Hays' 7th regiment Louisiana volunteers, and th
eir support, the skirmishers still advancing into the woods. Capt. Brackett's squadron of the 2d Cavalry, and two 12-pounder howitzers, comlled, 1 private wounded. 4 horses killed, 3 horses wounded. Capt. Brackett's Squadron, Companies G and I, Second Cavalry.--1 sergeant and y the skirmishers, and attended by a squadron of cavalry, under Capt. Brackett, rode forward to the position which was subsequently taken up bently unsupported. Gen. Tyler said: What can you do with them, Capt. Brackett? and Capt. Brackett answered: If they have batteries, they'll Capt. Brackett answered: If they have batteries, they'll pick a good many of my men off while we go down; but if you say the word, I'll take them. Gen. Tyler then sent orders back for the advance of the artillery and the leading brigade. Capt. Brackett showed that his concern respecting the batteries was not a personal one by riding downt the artillery, which was rapidly coming up. For a few minutes Capt. Brackett, with two or three others, remained to keep watch of movements
both favorable, induce the belief that the enemy suffered severely from our fire, and this belief is confirmed by the fact that the ensuing day, until twelve M., ambulances were seen coming and going from and to Manassas, two miles distant. In closing this report, it gives me great pleasure to call to your attention the gallant conduct of Col. Richardson, Capt. Britchschneider, who commanded the skirmishers, Capt. Ayres, Lieut. Loraine, who, I regret to say, was wounded, Lieuts. Dresser, Lyford, and Fallen, attached to Ayres' battery, and Lieuts. Benjamin and Babbitt, in charge of the two 20-pounder rifled guns, all of whom displayed great coolness, energy, and skill in the discharge of their official duties. With great respect, your obedient servant, Daniel Tyler, Brig.-Gen. Commanding lst Division. Brig.-Gen. Mcdowell, Commanding N. E. Virginia. Official report of Colonel Richardson. camp of the 4TH brigade, 1ST Div., Gen. Mcdowell's corps, in front of Blackburn's Fo
ect the surrounding country in almost every direction. Finally, at Mitchell's Ford, the stream is about equidistant between Centreville and Manassas, some six miles apart. On the morning of the 18th, finding that the enemy was assuming a threatening attitude, in addition to the regiments, whose positions have been already stated, I ordered up from Camp Pickens, as a reserve, in rear of Bonham's brigade, the effective men of 6 companies of Kelley's Eighth regiment Louisiana volunteers, and Kirkland's Eleventh regiment North Carolina volunteers, which, having arrived the night before en route for Winchester, I had halted in view of the existing necessities of the service. Subsequently the latter was placed in position to the left of Bonham's brigade. Appearing in heavy force in front of Bonham's position, the enemy, about meridian, opened fire, with several 20-pounder rifle guns from a hill, over one and a half miles from Bull Run. At the same time Kemper, supported by two compani
had become the special target of the enemy's rifle guns, notwithstanding it was surmounted by the usual yellow hospital flag, but which, however, I hope, for the sake of past associations, was ignorantly mistaken for a Confederate flag. The name of each individual medical officer I cannot mention. On the day of the engagement, I was attended by my personal staff, Lieutenant S. W. Ferguson, A. D.C., and my volunteer aides-de-camp, Colonels Preston, Manning, Chestnut, Miles, Chisholm, and Heyward, of South Carolina, to all of whom I am greatly indebted for manifold essential services in the transmission of orders on the field, and in the preliminary arrangements for occupation and maintenance of the line of Bull Run. Col. Thomas Jordan, Assistant Adjutant-General; Capt. C. N. Smith, Assistant Adjutant-General; Col. S. Jones, Chief of Artillery and Ordnance; Major Cabell, Chief Quarter-master; Capt. W. H. Fowle, Chief of Subsistence Department; Surgeon Thos. H. Williams, Medical D
to all of whom I am greatly indebted for manifold essential services in the transmission of orders on the field, and in the preliminary arrangements for occupation and maintenance of the line of Bull Run. Col. Thomas Jordan, Assistant Adjutant-General; Capt. C. N. Smith, Assistant Adjutant-General; Col. S. Jones, Chief of Artillery and Ordnance; Major Cabell, Chief Quarter-master; Capt. W. H. Fowle, Chief of Subsistence Department; Surgeon Thos. H. Williams, Medical Director, and Assistant Surgeon Brodie, Medical Purveyor of the General Staff attached to the army of the Potomac, were necessarily engaged, severally, with their responsible duties at my Headquarters at Camp Pickens, which they discharged with an energy and intelligence for which I have to tender my sincere thanks. Messrs. McLean, Wilcoxen, Kincheloe, and Brawner, citizens of this immediate vicinity, it is their due to say, have placed me and the country under great obligation for the information relative to this reg
ce shot, mortally wounded. Brigadier-General Longstreet, while finding on all sides alacrity, ardor and intelligence, mentions his special obligations to Cols. Moore, Garland, and Corse, commanding, severally, regiments of his brigade, and to their field-officers, Lieut.-Cols. Fry, Funsten, and Munford, and Majors Brent and Skinner, of whom he says: they displayed more coolness and energy than is usual among veterans of the old service. General Longstreet also mentions the conduct of Captain Marey, of the 17th Virginia volunteers, as especially gallant on one occasion, in advance of the Ford. The regiments of Early's brigade were commanded by Colonel Harry Hays, and Lieutenant-Colonels Williams and Hairston, who handled their commands in action with satisfactory coolness and skill, supported by their field officers, Lieut.-Col. DeChoiseul and Major Penn, of the 7th Louisiana, and Major Patton, of the 7th Virginia Volunteers. The skill, the conduct, and the soldierly qualitie
he enemy also opened another battery more to our left, so as to cross fire with the other upon the road. I ordered up at this time the 12th New York regiment, Col. Walrath, to the left of our battery, and it being formed in line of battle, I directed it to make a charge upon their position, the skirmishers still pushing forward aght Infantry Battalion, Capt. Britchschneider.--1 sergeant and 1 private killed. 4 privates wounded, (3 of the Second Michigan.) Twelfth New York Regiment, Col. Walrath commanding.--1 corporal and 4 privates killed. 1 corporal and 18 privates wounded. 1 corporal and 9 privates missing. Second Michigan Infantry, Col. J. B.egiments, into the woods on the left, while the First Massachusetts was drawn up in line of battle immediately in front of the woods, and the Twelfth New York, Col. Walrath, just at their right. The Second and Third Michigan regiments were sent to the extreme right, and marched in a right line from the road, towards the wood, and
E. C. Cabell (search for this): chapter 114
d a position in vicinity of Union Mills Ford. It consisted of Rhode's 5th and Siebel's 6th regiments of Alabama, and Seymour's 6th regiment of Louisiana volunteers, with four 12-pounder howitzers, of Walton's battery, and Harrison's, Green's and Cabell's companies of Virginia cavalry. D. R. Jones' brigade was in position in rear of McLean's Ford, and consisted of Jenkins' 5th South Carolina, and Bunt's 15th and Fetherstone's 18th regiments of Mississippi volunteers, with two brass 6-pounder ield, and in the preliminary arrangements for occupation and maintenance of the line of Bull Run. Col. Thomas Jordan, Assistant Adjutant-General; Capt. C. N. Smith, Assistant Adjutant-General; Col. S. Jones, Chief of Artillery and Ordnance; Major Cabell, Chief Quarter-master; Capt. W. H. Fowle, Chief of Subsistence Department; Surgeon Thos. H. Williams, Medical Director, and Assistant Surgeon Brodie, Medical Purveyor of the General Staff attached to the army of the Potomac, were necessarily e
kins' 5th South Carolina, and Bunt's 15th and Fetherstone's 18th regiments of Mississippi volunteers, with two brass 6-pounder guns of Walton's battery, and one company of cavalry. Longstreet's brigade covered Blackburn's Ford, and consisted of Moore's 1st, Garland's 11th and Crose's 17th regiments Virginia volunteers, with two 6-pounder brass guns of Walton's battery. Bonham's brigade held the approaches to Mitchell's Ford; it was composed of Kershaw's 2d, Williams' 3d, Bacon's 7th and Cash's 8th regiments South Carolina volunteers; of Shields' and Del Kemper's batteries, and of Flood's, Radford's, Payne's, Ball's, Wickman's and Powell's companies of Virginia cavalry, under Col. Radford. Cocke's brigade held the Fords below and in vicinity of the Stone Bridge, and consisted of Wither's 18th, Lieutenant-Colonel Strange's 19th, and R. T. Preston's 28th regiments, with Latham's battery and one company of cavalry, Virginia volunteers. Evans held my left flank and protected the
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