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William Smith (search for this): chapter 16
n — to operate on the south side of James River, Richmond being your objective point. To the force you already have will be added about ten thousand men from South Carolina, under Major-General Gillmore, who will command them in person. Maj.-Gen. W. F. Smith is ordered to report to you, to command the troops sent into the field from your own department. General Gillmore will be ordered to report to you at Fortress Monroe, with all the troops on transports, by the 18th instant, or as soon twell to the lieutenant-general as to the general commanding the department. See Appendix No. 25. On the 4th of May the embarkation began at Yorktown, See Appendix No. 26. of the Tenth and Eighteenth Army Corps, under the command of Generals W. F. Smith and Q. A. Gillmore, amounting to about twenty-five thousand men. The colored troops (part of the Eighteenth Corps), about fifty-five hundred men, under command of Brig.-Gen. E. W. Hincks, embarked at Fortress Monroe. At sunrise of the 5th
Edward Johnson (search for this): chapter 16
orks, which we occupied. In the morning of that day I received a telegram from the Secretary of War stating that a despatch just received reported a general attack by Grant, in which great success was achieved; that Hancock had captured Maj.-Gen. Edward Johnson's division, and taken him and Early, and forty cannon, and that the prisoners were counted by thousands. See Appendix No. 47. Twelve hours later the Secretary of War sent me a second telegram confirmatory of the first, in which I wan manoeuvring and fighting, without decisive results. . . . Early on the morning of the 2th a general attack was made on the enemy in position. The Second Corps, Major-General Hancock commanding, carried a salient of his line, capturing most of Johnson's division of Elwell's Corps and twenty pieces of artillery. But the resistance was so obstinate that the advantage gained did not prove decisive. The 13th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th, and 18th were consumed in manoeuvring and awaiting the arrival
Benjamin F. Butler (search for this): chapter 16
e of Davis frustrated advantages of occupying Bermuda hundred noted: Grant and Butler plan its occupation presidential election of 1864 both Lincoln and Chase offer Butler the Vice-presidency embarkation at Yorktown and seizure of City Point Drury's Bluff should have been seized at once fortifying the neck minor demonstrations misleading despatches from the Army of the Potomac Butler's Corps commanders, Smith and Gillmore, insubordinate and hostile the fighting around Drury's Bluff false despatches of Grant's successes Butler supposes him rapidly approaching and acts accordingly On the second day of November, 1863, without solicitation, I wan given to each corps commander of the movement intended. Respectfully, Benj. F. Butler, Major-General Commanding. For good and sufficient reasons, although itch at 7 P. M. to General Ames, who was watching the enemy at Petersburg, General Butler's horse. enclosing glorious news from Grant, and asking him to guard agains
April 21st (search for this): chapter 16
General Grant a generous and considerate reply to my letter, in which he assured me that no operations in North Carolina were intended, and that it was his wish that with all the forces of the Army of the James that could be spared from other duty, and such additional troops as had been ordered to report to me at Fortress Monroe, I should seize upon City Point and act directly in concert with the Army of the Potomac, with Richmond as the objective point. See Appendix No. 19. On the 21st of April, Lieutenant-Colonel Dent, of General Grant's staff, came to Fortress Monroe as bearer of a letter and memorandum of instructions. See Appendix No. 20. Before his arrival Plymouth, which General Grant desired should be held at all hazards, had fallen; but everything else for which they provided had already been done. From my conversation with Grant and from his reiterated instructions that I was to intrench and fortify at City Point and Bermuda Hundred; that our new base was to be e
April 20th (search for this): chapter 16
morning, and to push on with the greatest energy from that time for the accomplishment of the object designated in the plan of campaign. General Gillmore did not arrive from Charleston until the 3d of May, so that I was deprived of the full opportunity of organizing the Tenth Corps, and did not have so much consultation with him upon the plans of the movement as was desirable. His reasons for the delay were substantially set forth in a letter which I addressed to General Grant on the 20th of April. See Appendix No. 24. The iron-clads had not come up, and both these causes of delay were sources of great anxiety as well to the lieutenant-general as to the general commanding the department. See Appendix No. 25. On the 4th of May the embarkation began at Yorktown, See Appendix No. 26. of the Tenth and Eighteenth Army Corps, under the command of Generals W. F. Smith and Q. A. Gillmore, amounting to about twenty-five thousand men. The colored troops (part of the Eighteenth
April 19th (search for this): chapter 16
that the enemy were preparing to attack Plymouth. General Wessels, in command there, however, whose gallant defence of the place is applauded, gave me his belief that the post could be held, if the navy could hold the river. Commander Flusser (who was a Farragut, wanting thirty years experience, and no higher praise can be given) was sure that he could meet the rebel iron-clad ram, and laughed to scorn the idea of her driving out his gunboats. An attack was made in the night of the 19th of April, by the rebel ram. Flusser was killed by the recoil of a shell from a gun fired by his own hands; the Southfield was sunk; the Miami partially disabled and the rest of our fleet driven out of the Roanoke; the rebel gunboats commanded the town, and Plymouth, after a brave defence, was captured with some sixteen hundred men and considerable provisions. By direction of the lieutenant-general, I ordered Washington, N. C., to be evacuated, and the troops sent to join the force preparing fo
April 30th (search for this): chapter 16
icient transportation to take with us all the supply trains of the army, and it was some days before our whole trains got up, although every exertion was made by Colonel Biggs, chief quartermaster of the department, and Col. J. Wilson Shaffer, my chief of staff, to whose powers of business organization the country is largely indebted for a movement of troops which, for numbers, celerity, distance, and secrecy, was never before equalled, in any particular, in the history of war. On the 30th of April I received from General Grant my final orders, See Appendix No. 23. to start my forces on the night of the 4th of May so as to get up James River as far as possible by daylight the next morning, and to push on with the greatest energy from that time for the accomplishment of the object designated in the plan of campaign. General Gillmore did not arrive from Charleston until the 3d of May, so that I was deprived of the full opportunity of organizing the Tenth Corps, and did not have
e Army of the Potomac against Richmond. Troops could be brought from Washington and the North by water transportation in three days to the amount of a hundred thousand men without the loss of a single man by straggling, desertion, or sickness. The location was a healthy one. Supplies could always come up the river from the North by water, and the enormous cost of supplying the army through the sixty odd miles of march by land from Washington to Richmond would be saved. On the 1st day of April, General Grant came down to Fortress Monroe to consult with me as to the campaign against the rebel capital. It was the first time I ever met him. I showed him my maps of the department and also of the lay of the land around Richmond. I showed him also that Richmond was by no means as strongly fortified on the south side as it had been on the north, and that the country surrounding it on the south side was high, healthy land suitable for campaigning. But whether it was determined to
November 16th (search for this): chapter 16
e that holding Washington and Plymouth was useless, because, while Washington was distant from New Berne only about twenty miles, and Plymouth perhaps a less distance from Washington by land, the enemy held the intervening territory, and the only communication between these places was by water by travelling a distance of from 120 to 170 miles. This opinion was reported to the War Department, but no action was taken, and I did not feel at liberty to order the evacuation of either place. November 16, an expedition under Colonel Quinn, with 450 men of the One Hundred and Forty-Eighth New York Volunteers, captured a rebel marine brigade organized to prey upon the commerce of Chesapeake Bay, and a dangerous nest of pirates was broken up. November 27, Colonel Draper, with the Sixth U. S. Colored Troops, made a successful raid into the counties lying on the sounds in Virginia and North Carolina, capturing and dispersing organized guerillas. December 4, Brigadier-General Wilde, at th
April 2nd, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 16
n turning the left flank of General Lee and driving him back into Richmond, he could march with his own army by the left flank across the James and join me at City Point. I insert his orders. Let them tell the story of that planned campaign, which was carried out in every point by the Army of the James, and in no single particular by the Army of the Potomac, save that they came down to take advantage of the refuge we had prepared for them. [confidential] Fortress Monroe, Va., April 2, 1864. General:--In the spring campaign, which it is desirable shall commence at as early a day as practicable, it is proposed to have co-operative action of all the armies in the field, as far as this object can be accomplished. It will not be possible to unite our armies into two or three large ones, to act as so many units, owing to the absolute necessity of holding on to the territory already taken from the enemy. But, generally speaking, concentration can be practically effected by a
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