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Charles V. Land (search for this): chapter 92
nd in obedience to orders. But it is with the deepest shame and mortification I am compelled to report that one officer of Michigan has been guilty of gross cowardice in the face of the enemy. Capt. John A. Taner, of company K, Ninth Michigan volunteers, at the first alarm left his quarters, abandoned his company, and fled from his command under the enemy's fire, and I therefore enclose you herewith charges preferred against him for violation of the fifty-second Article of War. Capt. Charles V. De Land, company C, Ninth Michigan volunteers, deserves especial mention for cool and gallant conduct throughout the entire action, and the fearless mode in which he led his company as skirmishers in pursuit of the enemy when repulsed. Also First Lieut. Hiram Barrows, of company A, same regiment, for the tenacity with which he held his ground, although sorely pressed by the enemy. The loss of the detachment of the Ninth Michigan volunteers has been very severe for the number engaged, am
when we were illy prepared to receive the blow. On the evening of the twelfth, a negro came into camp with the startling intelligence that he had discovered three thousand cavalry, encamped on the Woodbury pike, about six miles from Murfreesboro. This important information was received like all other negro news, and our officers rested the safety of the regiment on the diligence of the pickets, and turned into their beds with a full belief that all would be well; but morning came, and ere Morpheus had yielded up his sleepy victims, the clatter of horses' hoofs and the sharp crack of the enemy's rifles fell fearfully upon their ears. The enemy managed to capture the pickets before they could give the alarm, and marched noiselessly into the town. We had no knowledge of their approach until they charged through our camp with irresistible fury, and hurled their death-shots into our slumbering tents. At this moment Colonel Duffield sprang into the centre of the combat, and received two
J. J. Wright (search for this): chapter 92
ent at the subsequent surrender of the detachment of the Ninth Michigan volunteers, under Lieut.-Col. Parkhurst, I can only state the facts as reported to me, which show that this force, isolated and reduced by killed and wounded to less than seventy-five men, after having held their ground from four A. M. to one P. M., were compelled to surrender or be cut to pieces by the entire force of the enemy. I am reliably informed that company B, Ninth Michigan volunteers, under command of First Lieut. Wright, held the Court-House against an incessant attack by a greatly superior force, from four A. M. to half-past 7 A. M., and did not surrender till the enemy had possession of the lower story of the building, and had started a fire with the evident intention of burning them out. Of the surrender of the Third Minnesota volunteers, and Hewitt's battery, under command of Col. Lester, I cannot speak from personal knowledge, nor have I received any information from sources sufficiently reli
s entirely unworthy of their attention. Since the departure of Duffield, the brigade has been under the command of Colonel Leicester, who had separated the regiments, in consequence of a jealous feeling which had sprung up between them, and locateded feebly in various parts of the town until eleven o'clock A. M., when parkhurst surrendered his regiment and sent Colonel Leicester a despatch requesting him to use every possible exertion to hold his position, and if he should fail to do so to fie them away. The citizens carried our wounded to the hospital, and the enemy's to private houses. It appears that Colonel Leicester had received the alarm in time to form his regiment and march it just far enough to allow the enemy to fall in uponpelled the citizens to bury the dead. This shameful disaster is attributable to the mismanagement and cowardice of Colonel Leicester; had he left the regiments and battery in a condition to support each other, they might have whipped the enemy and
ping with my own men, and therefore pitched my tent with the five companies of the Ninth Michigan volunteers. The force then at Murfreesboro was as follows: Five companies Ninth Michigan volunteers, Lieut.-Col. Parkhurst, two hundred strong, together with the first squadron Fourth Kentucky cavalry, eighty-one strong, were camped three fourths of a mile east of the town upon the Liberty Turnpike. One company, B, Ninth Michigan volunteers, Capt. Rounds, forty-two strong, occupied the Court.-House; the other four companies, Ninth Michigan volunteers, having been ordered to Tullahoma a month since, while nine companies of the Third Minnesota volunteers, Colonel Lester, (one company being on detached duty as train-guard,) four hundred and fifty strong, and Hewitt's battery, First regiment artillery, (two sections,) seventy-two strong, accupied the east bank of Stone's river, at a distance of more than----miles from the encampment of the detachment of the Ninth Michigan volunteers. Orde
Doc. 88.-surrender at Murfreesboro, Ky. Colonel Duffield's official report. Murfreesboro, Tenn., July 23, 1862. Colonel: Although I had not yet formally assumed command of the Twenty-third brigade, yet as Brig.-Gen. Thomas L. Crittenden and the other officers of his command have been captured and forwarded to Chattanooga, permit me to submit the following report of such portion of the attack on this post, made on the thirteenth inst., as came under my own personal observation: I arrived here, after an absence of two months, on the afternoon of the eleventh inst., coming down on the same train with Brig.-Gen. Thomas L. Crittenden, the newly-appointed commander of the post, and found that several material changes had been made in the location and encampment of the Twenty-third brigade since my departure. Instead of camping together, as it had done, it was separated into two portions several miles apart. The brigade had never been drilled as such, nor a brigade guard m
Jacob F. Stone (search for this): chapter 92
upon the Liberty Turnpike. One company, B, Ninth Michigan volunteers, Capt. Rounds, forty-two strong, occupied the Court.-House; the other four companies, Ninth Michigan volunteers, having been ordered to Tullahoma a month since, while nine companies of the Third Minnesota volunteers, Colonel Lester, (one company being on detached duty as train-guard,) four hundred and fifty strong, and Hewitt's battery, First regiment artillery, (two sections,) seventy-two strong, accupied the east bank of Stone's river, at a distance of more than----miles from the encampment of the detachment of the Ninth Michigan volunteers. Orders were received from Nashville the evening of the twelfth inst., directing the first squadron Fourth Kentucky cavalry to proceed at once to Lebanon. The total effective strength of the command at Murfreesboro on the morning of the thirteenth inst., did not therefore exceed eight hundred and fourteen men, including pickets. The attack was made at daybreak on the morni
The whole number engaged was one hundred and fifty at the camp, and seventy-five provost-guards. The Minnesota Third had six hundred effective men, a battery of four guns to support them, and lost one killed and seven wounded. The sick and wounded officers were all paroled on the spot, the rest were marched to Meminville with the soldiers, where the soldiers were paroled and sent back to Murfreesboro. They arrived in Nashville a few days ago, where they intend to remain until they are sent North. I was fortunate enough to get to the hospital and evade the parole. I shall soon join my company, which is now located in Tallahassee, with four others, under the command of Major Fox. After the rebels had completed their damnable work of destruction, they left the town and compelled the citizens to bury the dead. This shameful disaster is attributable to the mismanagement and cowardice of Colonel Leicester; had he left the regiments and battery in a condition to support each other, the
ed but little. They made a charge upon the battery, but were repulsed, and it was surrendered with the remainder. This was Captain Hewitt's celebrated Kentucky battery; whilst the Minnesota Third had no general attack. But of this hundred and twenty, who were thrown, unsustained, upon greatly superior numbers, every man seemed to feel the responsibility of his position, and nobly did each one do his duty. Among the most active and daring, and at the same time most conspicuous, was Adjutant Royston, whose chivalric bearing was observed wherever duty called and danger was to be met. He was cool on all occasions, and a stranger to fear. Upon Col. Wharton was conferred the honor of bringing the prisoners through to this city, where they arrived safely to-day. He was accompanied by company B, of the Texan rangers. Among the forty-five officers is found Gen. T. T. Crittenden, of Indiana, with one colonel, two lieutenant-colonels, one major, eleven captains and twenty-nine lieutena
Charles V. De Land (search for this): chapter 92
hurst succeeded in partly forming the men into a hollow square after fifty of our number had been killed or wounded. The rebels having emptied their guns, fell back to reload; this gave us a chance to load our guns and fix bayonets. When they made the second charge we were better prepared to meet them, and hurled such a volley of bullets into their advancing columns that they were forced to retire; but they soon rallied again, and with overwhelming numbers drove us from our position. Captain De Land then threw out his company as skirmishers, and did fearful execution. From this moment the men sought shelter behind the trees and fought on their own hooks; but it was madness to contend against such odds. Oh! how we longed for the arrival of the Minnesota Third; but it never made its appearance. The continued firing at the Court-House plainly indicated that the rebels had met a more formidable resistance in that quarter. It appears our boys had secured themselves in the Court-Ho
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