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Larkinsville (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
, and there was no alternative but to turn up Elk River by way of Gilbertsboro, Elkton, etc., to the stone bridge at Fayetteville. There we crossed Elk, and proceeded to Winchester and Decherd. At Fayetteville I received orders from General Grant to come to Bridgeport with the Fifteenth army corps, and leave General Dodge's command at Pulaski and along the railroad from Columbia to Decatur. I instructed General Blair to follow with the Second and First divisions by way of New-Market, Larkinsville, and Bellefonte, while I conducted the other two divisions by Decherd, the Fourth division crossing the mountains to Stevenson, and the Third by University Place and Sweiden's Cave. In person I proceeded by Sweiden's Lane and Battle Creek, reaching Bridgeport at night of November thirteenth. I immediately telegraphed to the Commanding-General my arrival and the position of my several divisions, and was summoned to Chattanooga. I took the first boat during the night of the fourtee
Austerlitz (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
y near this house. Let us glance around now, and see who occupy this little knob from which we are gazing upon the animated scene we have described. Since Napoleon stood in the midst of his marshals, on that eventful morning when the sun of Austerlitz broke from behind the eastern walls of the world, scarcely had a more distinguished group of personages been collected together than that which I there beheld. There was General Smith, Chief of the Engineer Department, a useful, industrious,n on Bald Knob the movement of the rebel legions toward the left, and in an instant perceived their advantage. In the face of three such leaders as Baird, Wood, and Sheridan, Bragg was repeating the old fatal error which lost the allied armies Austerlitz, and the Union Chickamauga — he was weakening his centre and making a flank movement in the presence of his enemy. In an instant Granger and Palmer hurled Wood and Sheridan down the slope of the ridge upon which they had been posted, and Bai
Bridgeport, Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
tration of Major-General Hooker's command at Bridgeport, preparatory to securing the river and main alley at Wauhatchie, by the direct road from Bridgeport by way of Whitesides to Chattanooga, with thupplies from the terminus of the railroad at Bridgeport, namely, the main wagon-road by way of White. Sherman's advance has only just reached Bridgeport. The rear will only reach there on the sixtherman. Sherman's forces were moved from Bridgeport by way of Whitesides--one division threateni to Chattanooga, and in person I returned to Bridgeport, rowing a boat down the Tennessee from Kelly they had arrived. The bridge of boats at Bridgeport was frail, and, though used day and night, o-in-Chief: As soon as communications with Bridgeport had been made secure, and the question of suin the operations against the enemy, reached Bridgeport with two divisions on the----. He came to th movement. General Sherman then returned to Bridgeport to direct the movements of his troops. Co[7 more...]
Greysville (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
y troops having pursued by the Rossville and Greysville road, came upon the enemy's cavalry at New-Bd the bridge, but Hooker thinks he can reach Greysville, and perhaps Ringgold, to-night. Many strag At daylight we resumed the march, and at Greysville, where a good bridge spanned the Chickamaugathe State line; and General Grant, coming to Greysville, consented that, instead of returning to Chat we encountered the enemy's rear-guard near Greysville at nightfall. I must award to this divisionart attempted to escape by retreating toward Greysville, but some of his force, finding their retreaurprising a portion of their rear-guard near Greysville, after nightfall, capturing three pieces of apturing an additional piece of artillery at Greysville. Hooker's advance encountered the enemy, poer of the department that my column march to Greysville, if possible, to intercept him. This was appers, (not including those taken by Palmer at Greysville, of which no return has been received;) also[5 more...]
Gettysburgh (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
e. It is a source of great satisfaction to have been instrumental in accomplishing such magnificent and important results with so little loss, and I can only attribute it to the care of that Providence who spread the mantle of his protection over us; and the bold impetuosity of my brave men that bore down, and gave the enemy no time to rally their broken columns. To the officers and men of General Geary's war-worn division, the heroes around whose brows cluster the unfading laurels of Gettysburgh, we of the Cumberland extend a soldier's greeting and congratulation; they were our companions in storming Lookout, and the best testimonial we can give them of our appreciation of their bravery and endurance, is that we thought their valor and conduct worthy of our most energetic emulation. Walker C. Whitaker, Brigadier-General Commanding. Brigadier-General Hazen's report. headquarters Second brigade, Third division, Fourth corps, in camp, near Knoxville, Tenn., December 10, 18
Huntsville (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ive, and taking one prisoner; Cutter's loss, one lieutenant and one man wounded. November sixteenth, Scout organized by General Paine and sent out from Gallatin and La Vergne returned, and report having killed five and captured twenty-six guerrillas, with horses, sheep, cattle, and hogs in their possession, collected for the use of the rebel army. Brigadier-General Crook, commanding Second division of cavalry, was ordered, November seventeenth, to concentrate his division at or near Huntsville, Ala., and to patrol the north side of the Tennessee from Decatur to Bridgeport, and to hunt up bands of guerrillas reported to be swarming about in that region, arresting and robbing Union citizens. General Crook reports, on the twenty-first, that an expedition sent down the Tennessee had destroyed nine boats between Whitesburgh and Decatur, some of them sixty feet long. The expedition crossed the river and drove off the rebels, taking their boats. From the best information to be obtained
Decatur (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
t push for Kingston, near which we would make a junction. By the time I reached Athens, I had time to study the geography, and sent him orders which found him at Decatur; that Kingston was out of our way; that he should send his boat to Kingston, but with his command strike across to Philadelphia, and report to me there. I had buivision of cavalry, was ordered, November seventeenth, to concentrate his division at or near Huntsville, Ala., and to patrol the north side of the Tennessee from Decatur to Bridgeport, and to hunt up bands of guerrillas reported to be swarming about in that region, arresting and robbing Union citizens. General Crook reports, on the twenty-first, that an expedition sent down the Tennessee had destroyed nine boats between Whitesburgh and Decatur, some of them sixty feet long. The expedition crossed the river and drove off the rebels, taking their boats. From the best information to be obtained, there were two small regiments of cavalry and one battery on t
Missionary Ridge, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ll number have fallen into our hands from Missionary Ridge. U. S. Grant, Major-General. From Ge was every thing that could be expected. Missionary Ridge was carried simultaneously at six differepossible against one given point, namely, Missionary Ridge, converging toward the north end of it — r advance well toward the northern end of Missionary Ridge, and moving as near simultaneously with himmediate front — on Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge — and if possible to send a force to the been the case on Lookout Mountain and on Missionary Ridge. Despite my emphatic and repeated instru of an hour from the enemy's batteries on Missionary Ridge. During the twenty-fourth and until afFort Wood vied with the rebel cannon upon Missionary Ridge, continued until nightfall, when all the and breastworks running along the foot of Missionary Ridge and across the valley to the base of Look way, and the Federal flag was planted on Missionary Ridge. The enemy was not slow in availing hims[33 more...
Tyner's Station (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
nding Second brigade, Second cavalry division, across South-Chickamauga to make raids on East-Tennessee and Georgia Railroad. He returned this evening, bringing two hundred and fifty prisoners, and reports he has destroyed the railroad from Tyner's Station to the Hiawassee, and ten miles south-west of Cleveland. He also destroyed eighty wagons and large quantity commissary stores and other supplies at Cleveland. The prisoners we have taken since the twenty-third now sum up more than five th forage and some additional caissons and ammunition were captured at Ringgold. On the twenty-eighth, Colonel Long (Fourth Ohio cavalry) returned to Chattanooga, from his expedition, and reported verbally that on the twenty-fourth he reached Tyner's Station, destroying the enemy's forage and rations at that place, also some cars, and doing considerable injury to the railroad. He then proceeded to Doltawah, where he captured and destroyed some trains loaded with forage; thence he proceeded to C
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
pursuit of Longstreet, and General Granger's move in, I put in motion my own command to return. General Howard was ordered to move, via Davis's Ford and Sweetwater, to Athens, with a guard formed at Charleston, to hold and repair the bridge which the enemy had taken after our passage up. General Jeff. C. Davis moved to Columbus on the Iliawassee, via Madisonville, and the two divisions of the Fifteenth corps moved to Telire Plains, to cover a movement of cavalry across the mountain into Georgia to overtake a wagon train which had dodged us on our way up, and had escaped by way of Murphy. Subsequently, on a report from General Howard that the enemy still held Charleston, I directed General Ewing's division to Athens, and went in person to Telire with General Morgan L. Smith's division. By the ninth, all our troops were in position, and we held the rich country between the Little Tennessee and the Hiawassee. The cavalry under Colonel Long passed the mountains at Telire, and proce
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