hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Medford (Massachusetts, United States) 1,971 3 Browse Search
Thatcher Magoun 602 2 Browse Search
Galen James 450 0 Browse Search
P. Sprague 380 0 Browse Search
Charlestown, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) 369 1 Browse Search
Mathew Cradock 276 10 Browse Search
Sarah Elizabeth 268 0 Browse Search
James O. Curtis 238 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 230 0 Browse Search
Samuel Lapham 172 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks). Search the whole document.

Found 1,478 total hits in 558 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...
Union Hall (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
resolving by vote,-- That the town will pay suitable respect to the memory of the late General George Washington; and that a Committee of eleven be chosen to make the proper arrangements. In the printed order of services, evincive of their deep regret, the Committee request as follows:-- 1. At one o'clock, P. M., the stores and shops of the town to be shut. The bell is to toll from one o'clock till the procession shall arrive at the meeting-house. The inhabitants to assemble at Union Hall, with a black crape or ribbon upon the left arm, above the elbow, as mourning. The scholars of the town school to join the procession in a body. The procession to move at two o'clock, under the direction of the Committee. 2. Females, of all ages, are requested to wear black ribbons, and to be seated in the meeting-house before the arrival of the procession. 3. Male strangers are requested to join the procession. 4. After the procession is seated, music, suited to the occasion.
Suffolk, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
hearts, when, by the charter of Oct. 7, 1691, Plymouth was annexed to Massachusetts. May 10, 1643: The General Court say that the whole plantation, within this jurisdiction, is divided into four shires; to wit, Essex, Norfolk, Middlesex, and Suffolk. Each had eight towns, except Norfolk, which had six. June 4, 1689: Ensign Peter Tufts was chosen by the town as Representative, according to the Honorable Council's signification. May 21, 1690: Peter Tufts was chosen Deputy to attend theich evince an intelligent and virtuous community. Votes in Medford for representatives in Congress. Dates of Election.Names.No. of Votes. Dec. 18, 1788.William Hull16.  Eleazer Brooks11. Oct. 4, 1790.Elbridge Gerry46. Nov. 2, 1792.Suffolk, Fisher Ames16.  Essex, Benjamin Goodhue16.  Middlesex, Samuel Dexter12. For the three counties, or district. Nov. 2, 1792.John Coffin Jones15. For the state at large, except Maine.  David Cobb16. Nov. 3, 1794.Benjamin Goodhue30. Nov. 7,
John Brook (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
had volunteered already, under the command of their gallant young physician, John Brooks. The Medford Company, fifty-nine in all, were out early on their march toniel P. Banks470.  Luther V. Bell136. Councillors and Senators. John Brooks, Councillor1812. P. C. Brooks, Councillor1818. Timothy Bigelow, Councillor Brooks, (under the Constitution)1780. Thomas Brooks1781. Aaron Hall1782. John Brooks1785. James Wyman1787. Thomas Brooks1788. Ebenezer Hall1789. Nathaniel Ha3dMar. 27, 1781. Edward BrooksMar. 27, 1781. Timothy FitchSept. 26, 1783. John BrooksJan. 28, 1785. John BrooksApril 26, 1787. Benjamin HallMar. 14, 1788. StepJohn BrooksApril 26, 1787. Benjamin HallMar. 14, 1788. Stephen Hall, junMar. 14, 1788. Thomas BrooksMar. 14, 1788. Aaron PutnamJune 25, 1789. Thomas BrooksFeb. 28, 1795. Ebenezer HallApril 16, 1798. Samuel SwanMay 29, 1amsFeb. 25, 1811. Nathaniel HallNov. 20, 1812. Isaac BrooksNov. 21, 1812. John BrooksFeb. 8, 1813. Samuel SwanFeb. 20, 1813. Timothy BigelowJuly 3, 1815. Dudle
Middlesex County (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
own, be sold at public auction. When the first gush of republican joy was over, and the town became settled in the new ways of freedom, then they began to ask how much independence had cost, in pounds, shillings, and pence. To give only two specimens of individual zeal in the cause of independence among us, we may mention the remark of our first Medford merchant, Benjamin Hall, Esq.:-- When the struggle began, in 1775, I would not have exchanged my property for that of any man in Middlesex County; and now, in 1784, I am worth nothing. The other case is that of Rev. Edward Brooks. He was librarian of Harvard College two years. On the 19th of April, 1775, he hastened towards Lexington, and did duty through the day. Lieut. Gould, taken prisoner at Concord, was committed to his custody at Medford. He was chaplain in the frigate Hancock, in 1777, when she captured the British frigate Fox. Afterwards, when the Hancock and Fox were retaken by the British off Halifax, he was carr
America (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
dford proceeded gently and wisely in taking possession of the estates of Tories and absentees. The order of Court, under which they acted, was passed April, 1776. We find the following in our records:-- Copy of the return made to the General Court, pursuant to a resolve of the Great and General Court passed last April, the Committee of Safety, &c., of the town of Medford have proceeded to take into their care the estates of sundry persons who are deemed inimical to the liberties of America, of which the following is a true account, viz.:-- Of the estate belonging to Joseph Thompson, late of Medford: one piece pasture land, and one piece marsh, which have been leased to Richard Crees, one year, for £ 7. 4s. A shop, leased to William Gowen for 40s. per annum. Half a dwelling-house, leased to Jonathan Patten, one year, for £ 6. 13s. 4d. Two-seventh parts of the following house and lands, being his share of his mother's thirds, undivided and not leased: a piece of plough-lan
South Hadley (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
n at Kittery Point, Maine, in 1696. He died at Kittery, June 6, 1759. Colonel Royal was appointed one of the Mandamus Councillors for this Province by his Majesty, Aug. 9, 1794; but he did not take the oath of office. 1743: He gave Charlestown £ 100, which was used to build a parsonage. While Representative, he returned to the town treasury his salary. In 1745, he gave £ 80 to the school on Charlestown Neck. By his will, he gave to Medford one hundred acres of land in Granby (South Hadley), for the use and better support of the common schools of the town. This Granby farm was sold, 1788, for one hundred dollars, to Mr. Richard Hall. Generosity was native with him, and shone the salient feature of his character. He loved to give, and loved to speak of it, and loved the reputation of it. Hospitality, too, was almost a passion with him. No house in the Colony was more open to friends; no gentleman gave better dinners, or drank costlier wines. As a master, he was kind to
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
meetings have been marked with that decorum and self-respect which evince an intelligent and virtuous community. Votes in Medford for representatives in Congress. Dates of Election.Names.No. of Votes. Dec. 18, 1788.William Hull16.  Eleazer Brooks11. Oct. 4, 1790.Elbridge Gerry46. Nov. 2, 1792.Suffolk, Fisher Ames16.  Essex, Benjamin Goodhue16.  Middlesex, Samuel Dexter12. For the three counties, or district. Nov. 2, 1792.John Coffin Jones15. For the state at large, except Maine.  David Cobb16. Nov. 3, 1794.Benjamin Goodhue30. Nov. 7, 1796.Samuel Sewall (unanimous)  Nov. 5, 1798.Samuel Sewall49. Nov. 3, 1800.Nathan Reed83. Nov. 1, 1802.John Q. Adams95.  William Eustice18. Nov. 1804.Josiah Quincy100.  William Eustice31. Nov. 3, 1806.Josiah Quincy58.  James Prince22. Nov. 7, 1808.Josiah Quincy120.  William Jarvis24. Nov. 5, 1810.Josiah Quincy96.  David Tilden18. Nov. 2, 1812.Asahel Stearns72.  William M. Richardson11. Nov. 7, 1814.Asahel Stearns1
Brandywine (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
who fell: William Polly and Henry Putnam, at Concord; and a man named Smith, and another named Francis, in West Cambridge. The two last mentioned were killed by the flank guard of the British, on the retreat to Boston. William Polly was brought to Medford alive, but died of his wounds April 25. The Medford men followed the retreating British from Lexington woods to Charlestown ferry, and shot their last ball during the embarkation. Medford men were with Washington at Monmouth, at Brandywine, at the crossing of the Delaware, and in other places, and fought bravely for the liberties and independence of their country. Mr. Nowell, in his diary, kept at Boston, has the following:-- Aug. 6, 1775: Skirmishing Mistick River. Several soldiers brought over here wounded. The house at Penny Ferry, Malden side, burnt. Aug. 13.--Several gondaloes sailed up Mistick River, upon which the Provincials and they had a skirmish many shots exchanged, but nothing decisive. It appear
Mystick River (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ber 1, about half-past 4, two hundred and sixty troops, under the command of Lieut.-Col. Maddison, embarked at Long Wharf, Boston, in thirteen boats, sailed up Mystic River, landed at Temple's farm (Ten Hills), marched to the powder-house, and removed all the powder in it, two hundred and fifty half-barrels, to Castle William. Thproduced. Five boats had been built, and the Selectmen of Medford were ordered to take a party of men to Charlestown Neck, to launch them, and carry them up Mystic River. And this was done. We find the inhabitants of Medford again assembled; and, Feb. 1, 1775, two Representatives, Benjamin Hall, and Stephen Hall, 3d, are seeir appurtenances, unto and to the use of the said Robert Fletcher, his heirs and assigns. The deed was for five hundred acres of land, on the west side of Mystic River, with the mansion-house; for all which Mr. Fletcher agreed to pay £ 16,000. These legislative acts and public documents show that Colonel Royal's property i
East India (search for this): chapter 5
d understand these acts of oppression, and could thus talk, were ready and willing to act; and their first prophetic deed was that of abstinence. Nov. 14, 1774, Medford voted thus: Resolved, That, if any person or persons sells or consumes any East India teas, the names of such persons to be posted up in some public place. Again, Voted that we will not use East India teas till the Acts be repealed. This was equivalent to cleaning the rifle, and looking into the cartridge-box. Medford had iEast India teas till the Acts be repealed. This was equivalent to cleaning the rifle, and looking into the cartridge-box. Medford had its stock of powder deposited in the powder-house, on Quarry Hill, and, on the 27th of August, 1774, removed it. Governor Gage heard that the powder in that house was fast leaving it; and, as he called it the king's powder, he resolved to remove it to Castle William (Fort Independence). Accordingly, on Thursday morning, September 1, about half-past 4, two hundred and sixty troops, under the command of Lieut.-Col. Maddison, embarked at Long Wharf, Boston, in thirteen boats, sailed up Mystic River,
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...