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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.12
der to weigh anchor, and the Confederate squadron, dropping slowly downstream, confined its activities to storming Pope's batteries on the Missouri shore below New Madrid. Farragut, threatening New Orleans, had caused the withdrawal of every available Confederate gunboat from the upper river, and the remaining river defense fleet under Commodore Hollins was not equal to the task of standing up to the determined and aggressive attempt of the Federals to seize and hold possession of the upper Mississippi. Commodore George N. Hollins, C. S. N. The McRae Below this island, a few miles, was the town of New Madrid on the Missouri shore, held also by the Confederates and protected by heavy guns behind breastworks. On the west bank of the river, General John Pope commanded a Federal army of twenty thousand men. His object was to capture New Madrid. First he occupied Point Pleasant, twelve miles below, erected batteries and cut off supplies from New Madrid. He then slowly appr
Fort McRae (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.12
owly downstream, confined its activities to storming Pope's batteries on the Missouri shore below New Madrid. Farragut, threatening New Orleans, had caused the withdrawal of every available Confederate gunboat from the upper river, and the remaining river defense fleet under Commodore Hollins was not equal to the task of standing up to the determined and aggressive attempt of the Federals to seize and hold possession of the upper Mississippi. Commodore George N. Hollins, C. S. N. The McRae Below this island, a few miles, was the town of New Madrid on the Missouri shore, held also by the Confederates and protected by heavy guns behind breastworks. On the west bank of the river, General John Pope commanded a Federal army of twenty thousand men. His object was to capture New Madrid. First he occupied Point Pleasant, twelve miles below, erected batteries and cut off supplies from New Madrid. He then slowly approached the town and meantime sent to Cairo for siege-guns. Th
Leonidas Polk (search for this): chapter 4.12
rient and had spent years in the suppression of the slave trade. Like Stonewall Jackson, he was a man of deep religious principles. On the Sunday after the fall of Fort Henry he preached a sermon in a church at Cairo. The next year the aged admiral lay sick in New York. His physician dreaded to tell him that his illness would be fatal, but did so. Well, answered the admiral, I am glad to be done with guns and war. We must get to our story. Fort Henry and Fort Donelson had fallen. General Polk had occupied Columbus, Kentucky, a powerful stronghold from which one hundred and fifty cannon pointed over the bluff. But why hold Columbus in its isolation when Henry and Donelson were lost? So thought the good bishop-general and he broke Camp on February 25, 1862, transferring one hundred and thirty of his big guns to Island No.10, and rolling the remainder down the one hundred and fifty foot embankment into the Mississippi. That nothing might be left for the foe, he burned eighteen
nkment into the Mississippi. That nothing might be left for the foe, he burned eighteen thousand bushels of corn and five thousand tons of hay, and when the Federals reached Columbus on March 4th they found only charred remains. Island No.10 was situated at the upper bend of a great double curve of the Mississippi, about forty miles below Columbus. It had been strongly fortified by General Beauregard, but Beauregard was called to Corinth and Shiloh and he turned the command over to General Mackall with about seven thousand men. It was confidently believed by its defenders that this fortified island would be the final stopping place of all hostile vessels on the great river, that none could pass it without being blown out of the water by the powerful batteries. The retreat down the river. The Flag-ship of the Confederate Fleet at Island No.10.--Below the dreaded battery at Island No.10, lay Commodore George N. Hollins, with his flag-ship, the McRae and seven other Confede
Thomas Jonathan Jackson (search for this): chapter 4.12
the opening of the Mississippi since the expedition left Cairo. Commander Henry Walke The Carondelet--first to run the gantlet at Island no.10 then handed them over to the Government and waited for his pay until after they had won their famous victories down the river. Their first commander was Andrew H. Foote, who was called the Stonewall Jackson of the West. He had won fame in the waters of the Orient and had spent years in the suppression of the slave trade. Like Stonewall Jackson, he was a man of deep religious principles. On the Sunday after the fall of Fort Henry he preached a sermon in a church at Cairo. The next year the aged admiral lay sick in New York. His physician dreaded to tell him that his illness would be fatal, but did so. Well, answered the admiral, I am glad to be done with guns and war. We must get to our story. Fort Henry and Fort Donelson had fallen. General Polk had occupied Columbus, Kentucky, a powerful stronghold from which one hundred
ral gunboats to pass down to the support of General Pope's crossing of the river below had begun. T10 and joined Commander Walke. The crossing of Pope's forces then proceeded, and the Confederates, downstream, confined its activities to storming Pope's batteries on the Missouri shore below New Madworks. On the west bank of the river, General John Pope commanded a Federal army of twenty thousding was incessant. At night it ceased, and as Pope was about to renew the attack he discovered thaoats; below it and along the Missouri shore was Pope's army. Southward was Reelfoot Lake, and eastwthing — had been swept down the current. General Pope's great desideratum was to secure boats to not damaged and but one man was killed. General Pope was sorely in need of a gunboat or two to sost and ere long its defenders must surrender. Pope believed it possible for the gunboats to run ths along the east bank of the river to silence. Pope's army crossed and occupied the Tiptonville roa
ng blown out of the water by the powerful batteries. The retreat down the river. The Flag-ship of the Confederate Fleet at Island No.10.--Below the dreaded battery at Island No.10, lay Commodore George N. Hollins, with his flag-ship, the McRae and seven other Confederate gunboats, holding in check the Federal troops chafing to cross the river and get at the inferior force of the enemy on the other side. This opposing fleet was further strengthened by a powerful floating battery which ivity on board the Confederate vessels. Commodore Hollins did not court a meeting to try conclusions with the powerful Eads gunboats and the mortar boats, which he supposed were all making their way down upon him. The flag at the masthead of the McRae quickly signaled the order to weigh anchor, and the Confederate squadron, dropping slowly downstream, confined its activities to storming Pope's batteries on the Missouri shore below New Madrid. Farragut, threatening New Orleans, had caused the
Andrew H. Foote (search for this): chapter 4.12
New Madrid--Island no.10--New Orleans Henry W. Elson Cairo in 1862-on the extreme right is the church where Flag-officer Foote preached a sermon after the fall of Fort Henry--next he led the gunboats at Island no.10. It has been truly said that without the American navy, insignificant as it was in the early sixti then handed them over to the Government and waited for his pay until after they had won their famous victories down the river. Their first commander was Andrew H. Foote, who was called the Stonewall Jackson of the West. He had won fame in the waters of the Orient and had spent years in the suppression of the slave trade. L The decks of this staunch gunboat, the Benton, w<*>e crowded on the morning of May 9, 1862, by her officers and men waiting solemnly for the appearance of Commodore A. H. Foote. The Benton had been his flag-ship in the operations around Island No.10 and Fort Pillow; but the wound he had received at Fort Donelson continued to unde
George N. Hollins (search for this): chapter 4.12
he Confederate Fleet at Island No.10.--Below the dreaded battery at Island No.10, lay Commodore George N. Hollins, with his flag-ship, the McRae and seven other Confederate gunboats, holding in check the men who manned it cut loose from their moorings and drifted down to the protection of Commodore Hollins' vigilant fleet. All was at once activity on board the Confederate vessels. Commodore HoCommodore Hollins did not court a meeting to try conclusions with the powerful Eads gunboats and the mortar boats, which he supposed were all making their way down upon him. The flag at the masthead of the McRaeable Confederate gunboat from the upper river, and the remaining river defense fleet under Commodore Hollins was not equal to the task of standing up to the determined and aggressive attempt of the Federals to seize and hold possession of the upper Mississippi. Commodore George N. Hollins, C. S. N. The McRae Below this island, a few miles, was the town of New Madrid on the Missouri sh
M. Jefferson Thompson (search for this): chapter 4.12
Madrid without a man having received a single scratch. The Carondelet and her commander had made good, and the next morning lay ready to support the army after having achieved one of the greatest feats in the record of the inland navy. On April 6th, her elated and plucky crew captured and spiked the guns of the battery opposite Point Pleasant, an event which convinced the Confederates that Island No.10 must be evacuated. That very night, encouraged by the success of the Carondelet, Commander Thompson, with the Pittsburgh, ran by the disheartened gunners on Island No.10 and joined Commander Walke. The crossing of Pope's forces then proceeded, and the Confederates, in full retreat, were hemmed in by Paine's division and surrendered, before dawn of April 8th. Colonel Cook's troops cut off in their retreat from Island No.10, were also compelled to surrender. The daring of Commander Walke in the face of this great danger had accomplished the first step in the opening of the Mississipp
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