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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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Charles H. Davis (search for this): chapter 4.12
Pillow; but the wound he had received at Fort Donelson continued to undermine his health until now, supported by Captain Phelps, he feebly made his way on deck to bid good-bye to his brave and faithful comrades and resign his command to Captain Charles H. Davis. At sight of him the old tars swung their hats and burst into loud huzzas, which quickly gave place to moist eyes and saddened countenances, as Foote, with tears trickling down his cheeks, addressed to them some simple, heartfelt words of farewell. The men leaned forward to catch every syllable uttered by the beloved commander's failing voice. An hour later the De Soto dropped down to the Benton. Foote was assisted to the transport's deck by his successor, Captain Davis, and Captain Phelps. Sitting in a chair on her guards, his breast filled with emotion, he gazed across the rapidly widening space separating him forever from the Benton, while the men on her deck continued to look longingly after him, till distance and tear
April 4th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 4.12
ills were busy in five States cutting the timber; machine shops and iron foundries in several cities were running day and night. The places of building were Carondelet, near St. Louis, and Mound City, Illinois. But the time was too short. The boats were unfinished at the end of sixty-five days. The Government refused to pay for them. And the builder, Eads — what did he do? He went ahead and used up his own fortune to finish those gunboats, The Carondelet. On the night of April 4, 1862, the Confederate garrison of the battery on Island No.10, peering through the darkness out on the Mississippi, caught sight of the flicker of flames from the smoke-stacks of a steamer proceeding down the river. They knew at once that the attempt of the Federal gunboats to pass down to the support of General Pope's crossing of the river below had begun. The men on shore leaped to their guns, and the crash of cannon and the rattle of musketry broke forth across the bosom of the river. A
nder, and this they did, while the second day's battle was raging at Shiloh--April 7, 1862. A gunboat of fighting fame, the Cairo The first engagement of the Cairo, a third-rate ironclad of 512 tons, mounting six 42-pounders, six 32-pounders, three 8-inch guns and one 12-lb. howitzer, was under the command of Lieutenant N. C. Bryant on February 19th, in the Cumberland River in Tennessee. At Clarksville with the gunboat Conestoga the Cairo engaged three forts, capturing the town. On May 10th the Cairo, still commanded by Lieutenant Bryant, participated in the action at Fort Pillow and the river combat with the Confederate River defense fleet. While being rammed the Cincinnati was so injured that she sank. The Mound City also was injured and three of the Confederate vessels were disabled. Once more the Cairo, on June 6th, with four other ironclad gunboats and two of the Ellet rams, engaged the Confederate flotilla off the city of Memphis. On December 12, 1862, the Cairo, the
December 12th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 4.12
unboat of fighting fame, the Cairo The first engagement of the Cairo, a third-rate ironclad of 512 tons, mounting six 42-pounders, six 32-pounders, three 8-inch guns and one 12-lb. howitzer, was under the command of Lieutenant N. C. Bryant on February 19th, in the Cumberland River in Tennessee. At Clarksville with the gunboat Conestoga the Cairo engaged three forts, capturing the town. On May 10th the Cairo, still commanded by Lieutenant Bryant, participated in the action at Fort Pillow and the river combat with the Confederate River defense fleet. While being rammed the Cincinnati was so injured that she sank. The Mound City also was injured and three of the Confederate vessels were disabled. Once more the Cairo, on June 6th, with four other ironclad gunboats and two of the Ellet rams, engaged the Confederate flotilla off the city of Memphis. On December 12, 1862, the Cairo, then under the command of Lieutenant T. O. Selfridge, was destroyed by a torpedo in the Yazoo River.
April 7th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 4.12
the great guns could not be sufficiently depressed, and they overshot the mark. About midnight the gunboat reached New Madrid uninjured. Two nights later the Pittsburgh ran the gantlet of Island No.10. The two vessels soon reduced the batteries along the east bank of the river to silence. Pope's army crossed and occupied the Tiptonville road. The Confederate garrison of seven thousand men could only surrender, and this they did, while the second day's battle was raging at Shiloh--April 7, 1862. A gunboat of fighting fame, the Cairo The first engagement of the Cairo, a third-rate ironclad of 512 tons, mounting six 42-pounders, six 32-pounders, three 8-inch guns and one 12-lb. howitzer, was under the command of Lieutenant N. C. Bryant on February 19th, in the Cumberland River in Tennessee. At Clarksville with the gunboat Conestoga the Cairo engaged three forts, capturing the town. On May 10th the Cairo, still commanded by Lieutenant Bryant, participated in the action at
January 14th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 4.12
rs must surrender. Pope believed it possible for the gunboats to run the gantlet of the batteries of Island No.10. But Foote thought it impossible, in the face of the mouths of half a hundred cannon that yawned across the channel. He refused to force anyone to so perilous an undertaking, and the commanders of the vessels all agreed A veteran of many river fights The St. Louis was the earliest of the Eads iron-clad gunboats to be completed and is first mentioned in despatches on January 14, 1862, when with the Essex and Tyler she engaged the Confederate batteries at Columbus, Kentucky. The St. Louis, commanded by Lieutenant Leonard Paulding, participated in the capture of Fort Henry, going into action lashed to the Carondelet. She was struck seven times. At Fort Donelson she was Foote's flagship. Island No.10, Fort Pillow, Memphis — at all these places the St. Louis distinguished herself. On October 1, 1862, the St. Louis was renamed the Baron de Kalb. All through the Vicks
August 7th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 4.12
the close of the first day's conflict the Confederates made a wild, impetuous dash on the Union camp, it was the two little wooden gunboats that aided in preserving the Camp from capture or complete demoralization. We have now to relate a series of operations down the Mississippi, in which the gunboats were the alpha and omega and almost all that falls between them. The creator of the fleet of gunboats with which we now have to deal was that master-builder, James B. Eads. It was on August 7, 1861, that Eads signed a contract with the Government to build and deliver seven ironclads, each one hundred and seventy-five feet long, fifty-one feet wide, drawing six feet of water, and carrying thirteen guns. In a week or two four thousand men were at work on the contract; sawmills were busy in five States cutting the timber; machine shops and iron foundries in several cities were running day and night. The places of building were Carondelet, near St. Louis, and Mound City, Illinois.
gunboat of fighting fame, the Cairo The first engagement of the Cairo, a third-rate ironclad of 512 tons, mounting six 42-pounders, six 32-pounders, three 8-inch guns and one 12-lb. howitzer, was under the command of Lieutenant N. C. Bryant on February 19th, in the Cumberland River in Tennessee. At Clarksville with the gunboat Conestoga the Cairo engaged three forts, capturing the town. On May 10th the Cairo, still commanded by Lieutenant Bryant, participated in the action at Fort Pillow and the river combat with the Confederate River defense fleet. While being rammed the Cincinnati was so injured that she sank. The Mound City also was injured and three of the Confederate vessels were disabled. Once more the Cairo, on June 6th, with four other ironclad gunboats and two of the Ellet rams, engaged the Confederate flotilla off the city of Memphis. On December 12, 1862, the Cairo, then under the command of Lieutenant T. O. Selfridge, was destroyed by a torpedo in the Yazoo River.
July 12th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 4.12
eries at Columbus, Kentucky. The St. Louis, commanded by Lieutenant Leonard Paulding, participated in the capture of Fort Henry, going into action lashed to the Carondelet. She was struck seven times. At Fort Donelson she was Foote's flagship. Island No.10, Fort Pillow, Memphis — at all these places the St. Louis distinguished herself. On October 1, 1862, the St. Louis was renamed the Baron de Kalb. All through the Vicksburg operations the De Kalb saw service with Admiral Porter. On July 12, 1863, after the fall of Vicksburg, she was sunk by a torpedo in the Yazoo River. This photograph was a gift to the present owner from James B. Eads, the builder. with him that the running of the batteries was too great a risk, except one--Henry Walke, commander of the Carondelet. Are you willing to try it with your vessel? asked Foote, of Commander Walke, in the presence of the other officers. Yes, answered Walke, and it was agreed that the Carondelet should attempt to run the batterie
New Madrid--Island no.10--New Orleans Henry W. Elson Cairo in 1862-on the extreme right is the church where Flag-officer Foote preached a sermon after the fall of Fort Henry--next he led the gunboats at Island no.10. It has been truly said that without the American navy, insignificant as it was in the early sixties, the North could hardly have succeeded in the great war. The blockade was necessary to success, and without the navy the blockade would have been impossible. It may further be said that without the gunboats on the winding rivers of the middle West success in that quarter would have been equally impossible. It was these floating fortresses that reduced Fort Henry and that gave indispensable aid at Fort Donelson. At Shiloh, when at the close of the first day's conflict the Confederates made a wild, impetuous dash on the Union camp, it was the two little wooden gunboats that aided in preserving the Camp from capture or complete demoralization. We have no
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