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Thomas O. Moore (search for this): chapter 5.28
Monday the 3d the column was pushed along without ceremony at a rapid pace until night, when a halt was ordered and the battalion laid down in a piece of pine woods to rest. There was some desultory eating in this camp, but so little of it that there was no lasting effect. At early dawn of Tuesday the 4th, the men struggled to their feet, and with empty stomachs and brave hearts resumed their places in the ranks, and struggled on with the column as it marched steadily in the direction of Moore's church, in Amelia county, where it arrived in the night. The men laid down under the shelter of a fine grove, and friend divided with friend the little supplies of raw bacon and bread picked up on the day's march. The men were scarcely stretched on the ground and ready for a good nap, when the orderly of the Howitzers commenced bawling, Detail for guard!! Detail for guard!! Fall in here, fall in!! Then followed the names of the detail. Four men answered to their names, but declared the
up of perhaps a dozen men gathered around Lieutenant McRae. He was indignant. He proposed another tal front-marched the colors and color guard. McRae saw his opportunity. He ordered his squad to ide, and with the most superb insolence mocked McRae and his squad, already, as he thought, hopelesur men,--Fry and Garber the same number. Lieutenant McRae was placed in command. The infantry detawhat were the chances for making a stand, Lieutenant McRae found that the infantry skirmishers had b, as unconcernedly as possible, to the rear of McRae. Seeing this, McRae ordered his squad to reti line and firing at them with solid shot! Lieutenant McRae laughed at the ridiculous sight, remonstr were famished and burning with fever. Lieutenant McRae, noticing a number of wagons and guns parurrendered. I don't believe it, sir! replied McRae, strutting around as mad as a hornet; you mustthern Virginia had never existed. To say that McRae was surprised, disgusted, indignant and incred[4 more...]
R. N. Scott (search for this): chapter 5.28
turn be awakened, and again the column was in motion, and nothing heard but the monotonous tread of the weary feet, the ringing and rattling of the trappings of the horses and the never ending cry of Close up men, close up!! Through the long, weary night there was no rest. The alternate halting and hurrying was terribly trying and taxed the endurance of the most determined men to the very utmost; and yet on the morning of Wednesday the 5th, when the battalion reached the neighborhood of Scott's shops, every man was in place and ready for duty. From this point, after some ineffectual efforts to get a breakfast, the column pushed on in the direction of Amelia Courthouse, at which point Colonel Cutshaw was ordered to report to General James A. Walker, and the battalion was thereafter a part of Walker's division. The 5th was spent at or near the Courthouse-how, it is difficult to remember; but the day was marked by several incidents worthy of record. About two hundred and twenty
May 12th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 5.28
soldier life. By Private Carlton McCarthy. Paper no. 5--improvised infantry — to Appomattox Courthouse. Sunday, April 2d, 1865, found Cutshaw's battalion of artillery occupying the earthworks at Fort Clifton, on the Appomattox, about two miles below Petersburg, Virginia. The command was composed of the Second company Richmond Howitzers, Captain Lorraine F. Jones, Garber's battery, Fry's battery and remnants of five other batteries (saved from the battle of Spotsylvania Courthouse, May 12, 1864), and had present for duty nearly five hundred men, with a total muster roll, including the men in prison, of one thousand and eighty. The place — the old Clifton house --was well fortified, and had the additional protection of the river along the entire front of perhaps a mile. The works extended from the Appomattox on the right to Swift creek on the left. There were some guns of heavy calibre, mounted and ready for action, and in addition to these some field-pieces disposed along t
April 10th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 5.28
h respected by all picket officers, patrols, &c., of the Federal army as though they bore the signature of U. S. Grant. The following is a copy of one of these paroles, recently made from the original: Appomattox Courthouse, Virginia, April 10th, 1865 The bearer, Private----------,of Second company Howitzers, Cutshaw's battalion, a paroled prisoner of the Army of Northern Virginia, has permission to go to his home and there remain undisturbed. L. F. Jones, Captain Commanding Second Cotions. Captain Fry, who commanded after Colonel Cutshaw was wounded, assembled the battalion, thanked the men for their faithfulness, bid them farewell, and read the following: headquarters Army of Northern Virginia, Appomattox Courthouse, April 10th, 1865. General order no. 9. After four years of arduous service, marked by unsurpassed courage and fortitude, the Army of Northern Virginia has been compelled to yield to overwhelming numbers and resources. I need not tell the brave survivo
med, the roll was called and the battalion marched slowly and solemnly away. No one doubted that the command would march at once to the assistance of the troops at or near Five Forks. It was thought that before morning every man would have his musket and his supply of ammunition, and the crack of day would see the battalion rushing into battle in regular infantry style, whooping and yelling like demons. But they got no arms that night. The march was steady till broad day of Monday the 3d of April. Of course the men felt mortified at having to leave the guns, but there was no help for it, as the battery horses which had been sent away to winter had not returned. It was evident that the battalion had bid farewell to artillery and commenced a new career as infantry. As the night wore on the men learned that the command was not going to any point on the lines. That being determined, no one could guess its destination. Later in the night, probably as day approached, the sky in t
on boards were knocked out of a limber chest, the dough was spread on them and held near the fire till partially cooked. Then, with what delight, it was devoured! At daybreak Saturday the march was resumed and continued almost without interruption during the whole day — the men,those whose gums and teeth were not already too sore, crunching parched corn and raw bacon as they trudged along. Saturday night the battalion rested near Appomattox Courthouse in a pine woods. Sunday morning, April 9th, after a short march, the column entered the village of Appomattox Courthouse, marching by what seemed to be the main road. Several dead men, dressed in the uniform of United States regular artillery, were lying on the roadside, their faces turned up to the blaze of the sun. One had a ghastly wound in the breast, which must have been made by grape or canister. On through the village without halting marched the column. Whitworth shots went hurtling through the air every few minutes, in
April 2nd, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 5.28
Detailed Minutiae of soldier life. By Private Carlton McCarthy. Paper no. 5--improvised infantry — to Appomattox Courthouse. Sunday, April 2d, 1865, found Cutshaw's battalion of artillery occupying the earthworks at Fort Clifton, on the Appomattox, about two miles below Petersburg, Virginia. The command was composed of the Second company Richmond Howitzers, Captain Lorraine F. Jones, Garber's battery, Fry's battery and remnants of five other batteries (saved from the battle of Spotsylvania Courthouse, May 12, 1864), and had present for duty nearly five hundred men, with a total muster roll, including the men in prison, of one thousand and eighty. The place — the old Clifton house --was well fortified, and had the additional protection of the river along the entire front of perhaps a mile. The works extended from the Appomattox on the right to Swift creek on the left. There were some guns of heavy calibre, mounted and ready for action, and in addition to these some field-p
was again in motion. What strange sensations the men had as they marched slowly across the High bridge. They knew its great height, but the night was so dark that they could not see the abyss on either side. Arrived on the other side, the wornout soldiers fell to the ground and slept, more dead than alive. Some had slept as they marched across the bridge, and declared that they had no distinct recollection of when they left it, or how long they were upon it. Early on the morning of the 7th, the march was resumed and continued through Farmville, across the bridge and to Cumberland heights, overlooking the town. Here, on the bare hillside, a line of battle was formed, for what purpose the men did not know — the Howitzers occupying a central place in the line, and standing with their feet in the midst of a number of the graves of soldiers who had perished in the hospitals in the town. While standing thus in line a detail was sent into the town to hunt up some rations. They fo
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