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William Terry (search for this): chapter 6.41
f General Edward Johnson. headquarters Johnson's division, September 30th, 1863. Major — I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of my division from June 15th to July 31st, 1863, embracing the campaign in Pennsylvania and battle of Gettysburg. My division comprised the Stonewall brigade, Brigadier-Gen-J. A. Walker, consisting of the Second, Fourth, Fifth, Twenty-seventh and Thirty-third Virginia regiments, commanded respectively by Colonel Nadenbousch, Major Terry, Colonel Funk, Lieutenant-Colonel Shriver and Captain Golliday; J. M. Jones' brigade, consisting of the Twenty-first, Twenty-fifth, Forty-second, Forty-fourth, Forty-eighth and Fiftieth Virginia regiments, commanded respectively by Captain W. P. Moseley, Colonel Higginbotham, Captain Richardson, Captain Buckner, Lieutenant-Colonel Dungan and Lieutenant-Colonel Salyer; George H. Steuart's brigade, consisting of Tenth, Twenty-third and Thirty-seventh Virginia regiments, First Maryland batta
Eleventh North Carolina regiment, Colonel Leventhorpe commanding, and the Twenty-sixth North Carolina regiment, Colonel Burgwyn commanding, displayed conspicuous gallantry, of which I was an eye-witness. The Twenty-sixth North Carolina regiment, of its whole number, lost in this action more than half, in killed and wounded, among whom were Colonel Burgwyn killed, and Lieutenant-Colonel Lane severely wounded. Colonel Leven-thrope, of the Eleventh North Carolina regiment, was wounded and Colonel Ross killed. The Fifty-second and Forty-seventh North Carolina regiments,. on the right of the centre, were subjected to a heavy artillery fire, but suffered much less than the Eleventh and Twenty-sixth North Carolina regiments. These regiments behaved to my entire satisfaction. Pettigrew's brigade, under the leadership of that gallant officer and accomplished scholar, Brigadier-General J. Johnston Pettigrew (now lost to his country), fought as well and displayed as heroic courage as it
unable to hold the position he had gained; the enemy concentrated on his front and flanks an overwhelming force. The brigade maintained its position until every field officer save two were shot down, and its ranks terribly thinned. Among the officers of his brigade, especially mentioned by General Davis as displaying conspicuous gallantry on this occasion, are noticed Colonel Stone, commanding Second Mississippi regiment; Colonel Connally, commanding Fifty-fifth North Carolina regiment; Major Belo, Fifty-fifth North Carolina regiment; Lieutenant-Colonel Moseley and Major Feeny, Forty-second Mississippi regiment, severely wounded while gallantly leading their regiments to the charge. Lieutenant-Colonel Smith, of the Fifty-fifth North Carolina regiment, was at the same time killed, as also was the gallant Lieutenant Roberts, of the Second Mississippi regiment, who, with a detachment of the Second and Forty-second Mississippi regiments, after a hand to hand conflict with the enemy, su
emy in heavy force and broke through his first, second and third lines. The Eleventh North Carolina regiment, Colonel Leventhorpe commanding, and the Twenty-sixth North Carolina regiment, Colonel Burgwyn commanding, displayed conspicuous gallantry, of which I was an eye-witness. The Twenty-sixth North Carolina regiment, of its whole number, lost in this action more than half, in killed and wounded, among whom were Colonel Burgwyn killed, and Lieutenant-Colonel Lane severely wounded. Colonel Leven-thrope, of the Eleventh North Carolina regiment, was wounded and Colonel Ross killed. The Fifty-second and Forty-seventh North Carolina regiments,. on the right of the centre, were subjected to a heavy artillery fire, but suffered much less than the Eleventh and Twenty-sixth North Carolina regiments. These regiments behaved to my entire satisfaction. Pettigrew's brigade, under the leadership of that gallant officer and accomplished scholar, Brigadier-General J. Johnston Pettigrew
Leventhorpe (search for this): chapter 6.41
sion. Brockenbrough's brigade behaved with its usual gallantry, capturing two stands of colors and a number of prisoners. The officer who made the report of the part taken by Brockenbrough's brigade in this day's fight, has ommitted to mention the names of the officers and soldiers who distinguished themselves on this occasion. Pettigrew's brigade encountered the enemy in heavy force and broke through his first, second and third lines. The Eleventh North Carolina regiment, Colonel Leventhorpe commanding, and the Twenty-sixth North Carolina regiment, Colonel Burgwyn commanding, displayed conspicuous gallantry, of which I was an eye-witness. The Twenty-sixth North Carolina regiment, of its whole number, lost in this action more than half, in killed and wounded, among whom were Colonel Burgwyn killed, and Lieutenant-Colonel Lane severely wounded. Colonel Leven-thrope, of the Eleventh North Carolina regiment, was wounded and Colonel Ross killed. The Fifty-second and Forty
cers being made through their chief. My thanks are particularly due to Major Pegram for his ready co-operation. He displayed his usual coolness, good judgment and gallantry. My thanks are also due to my personal staff--Major Finney, Assistant Adjutant-General; Major Harrison, Adjutant and Inspector-General; Lieutenants Selden and Heth, my Aids-de-Camp, and Acting Engineer-Officer William O. Slade--for their valuable services in conveying orders and superintending their execution. I take this occasion to mention the energy displayed by my Chief Quartermaster, Major A. W. Vick, and his assistants, in collecting transportation for the division when in Pennsylvania, the division having a limited supply when it crossed the Potomac; also to Major Hungerford, Chief Commissary of Subsistence, and his assistants for their activity in procuring supplies. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, H. Heth, Major-General. Captain W. N. Starke, A. A.-General Third Corps, A. N. V.
J. B. Walton (search for this): chapter 6.41
the Twenty-first, Twenty-fifth, Forty-second, Forty-fourth, Forty-eighth and Fiftieth Virginia regiments, commanded respectively by Captain W. P. Moseley, Colonel Higginbotham, Captain Richardson, Captain Buckner, Lieutenant-Colonel Dungan and Lieutenant-Colonel Salyer; George H. Steuart's brigade, consisting of Tenth, Twenty-third and Thirty-seventh Virginia regiments, First Maryland battalion and First and Third North Carolina regiments, commanded respectively by Colonel Warren, Lieutenant-Colonel Walton, Major Wood, Lieutenant-Colonel Brown, Major Parsley and Lieutenant-Colonel Herbert; Nicholls' brigade, Colonel J. M. Williams commanding, consisting of First, Second, Tenth, Fourteenth and Fifteenth Louisiana regiments, commanded respectively by Lieutenant-Colonel Nolan, Lieutenant-Colonel Burke, Major Powell, Lieutenant-Colonel Zable and Major Brady, with Andrews' battalion of artillery, Major Latimer commanding, consisting of Raines', Dement's, Brown's and Carpenter's batteries.
batteries of Pegram's battalion, in mentioning the assistance they rendered during this battle; but I have been unable to find out the names of the commanders of those batteries stationed at the points where important service was rendered — all reports of artillery officers being made through their chief. My thanks are particularly due to Major Pegram for his ready co-operation. He displayed his usual coolness, good judgment and gallantry. My thanks are also due to my personal staff--Major Finney, Assistant Adjutant-General; Major Harrison, Adjutant and Inspector-General; Lieutenants Selden and Heth, my Aids-de-Camp, and Acting Engineer-Officer William O. Slade--for their valuable services in conveying orders and superintending their execution. I take this occasion to mention the energy displayed by my Chief Quartermaster, Major A. W. Vick, and his assistants, in collecting transportation for the division when in Pennsylvania, the division having a limited supply when it crosse
Twenty-fifth, Forty-second, Forty-fourth, Forty-eighth and Fiftieth Virginia regiments, commanded respectively by Captain W. P. Moseley, Colonel Higginbotham, Captain Richardson, Captain Buckner, Lieutenant-Colonel Dungan and Lieutenant-Colonel Salyer; George H. Steuart's brigade, consisting of Tenth, Twenty-third and Thirty-seventh Virginia regiments, First Maryland battalion and First and Third North Carolina regiments, commanded respectively by Colonel Warren, Lieutenant-Colonel Walton, Major Wood, Lieutenant-Colonel Brown, Major Parsley and Lieutenant-Colonel Herbert; Nicholls' brigade, Colonel J. M. Williams commanding, consisting of First, Second, Tenth, Fourteenth and Fifteenth Louisiana regiments, commanded respectively by Lieutenant-Colonel Nolan, Lieutenant-Colonel Burke, Major Powell, Lieutenant-Colonel Zable and Major Brady, with Andrews' battalion of artillery, Major Latimer commanding, consisting of Raines', Dement's, Brown's and Carpenter's batteries. On June 16th my
cers being made through their chief. My thanks are particularly due to Major Pegram for his ready co-operation. He displayed his usual coolness, good judgment and gallantry. My thanks are also due to my personal staff--Major Finney, Assistant Adjutant-General; Major Harrison, Adjutant and Inspector-General; Lieutenants Selden and Heth, my Aids-de-Camp, and Acting Engineer-Officer William O. Slade--for their valuable services in conveying orders and superintending their execution. I take this occasion to mention the energy displayed by my Chief Quartermaster, Major A. W. Vick, and his assistants, in collecting transportation for the division when in Pennsylvania, the division having a limited supply when it crossed the Potomac; also to Major Hungerford, Chief Commissary of Subsistence, and his assistants for their activity in procuring supplies. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, H. Heth, Major-General. Captain W. N. Starke, A. A.-General Third Corps, A. N. V.
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