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ounded. His conduct entitles him to a commission. Fewer wounded from my division were left in the hands of the enemy than from any other division of the army, for which I am indebted to the active exertion of Chief-Surgeon R. T. Coleman. Mr. E. J. Martin, my volunteer Aid-de-Camp, rendered valuable service by his prompt transmission of orders; and Major E. L. Moore faithfully performed his duties as Assistant Inspector-General. The troops are much indebted to Major T. E. Ballard and G. H. Kyle, of the Commissary Department, for supplies during the trying period covered by this report; cattle and flour were frequently procured within the enemy's lines. All of the officers and men of the division who came under my observation during their three days exposure to the enemy's incessant fire of musketry and artillery from the front and artillery from the left and rear, behaved as brave men. For particular instances of gallantry, I have the honor to refer you to the reports of briga
H. A. Herbert (search for this): chapter 6.41
eth Virginia regiments, commanded respectively by Captain W. P. Moseley, Colonel Higginbotham, Captain Richardson, Captain Buckner, Lieutenant-Colonel Dungan and Lieutenant-Colonel Salyer; George H. Steuart's brigade, consisting of Tenth, Twenty-third and Thirty-seventh Virginia regiments, First Maryland battalion and First and Third North Carolina regiments, commanded respectively by Colonel Warren, Lieutenant-Colonel Walton, Major Wood, Lieutenant-Colonel Brown, Major Parsley and Lieutenant-Colonel Herbert; Nicholls' brigade, Colonel J. M. Williams commanding, consisting of First, Second, Tenth, Fourteenth and Fifteenth Louisiana regiments, commanded respectively by Lieutenant-Colonel Nolan, Lieutenant-Colonel Burke, Major Powell, Lieutenant-Colonel Zable and Major Brady, with Andrews' battalion of artillery, Major Latimer commanding, consisting of Raines', Dement's, Brown's and Carpenter's batteries. On June 16th my division left camp at Stephenson's and marched to Sbepherdstown,
sion. Pettigrew's brigade encountered the enemy in heavy force and broke through his first, second and third lines. The Eleventh North Carolina regiment, Colonel Leventhorpe commanding, and the Twenty-sixth North Carolina regiment, Colonel Burgwyn commanding, displayed conspicuous gallantry, of which I was an eye-witness. The Twenty-sixth North Carolina regiment, of its whole number, lost in this action more than half, in killed and wounded, among whom were Colonel Burgwyn killed, and LiColonel Burgwyn killed, and Lieutenant-Colonel Lane severely wounded. Colonel Leven-thrope, of the Eleventh North Carolina regiment, was wounded and Colonel Ross killed. The Fifty-second and Forty-seventh North Carolina regiments,. on the right of the centre, were subjected to a heavy artillery fire, but suffered much less than the Eleventh and Twenty-sixth North Carolina regiments. These regiments behaved to my entire satisfaction. Pettigrew's brigade, under the leadership of that gallant officer and accomplished s
nd flanks an overwhelming force. The brigade maintained its position until every field officer save two were shot down, and its ranks terribly thinned. Among the officers of his brigade, especially mentioned by General Davis as displaying conspicuous gallantry on this occasion, are noticed Colonel Stone, commanding Second Mississippi regiment; Colonel Connally, commanding Fifty-fifth North Carolina regiment; Major Belo, Fifty-fifth North Carolina regiment; Lieutenant-Colonel Moseley and Major Feeny, Forty-second Mississippi regiment, severely wounded while gallantly leading their regiments to the charge. Lieutenant-Colonel Smith, of the Fifty-fifth North Carolina regiment, was at the same time killed, as also was the gallant Lieutenant Roberts, of the Second Mississippi regiment, who, with a detachment of the Second and Forty-second Mississippi regiments, after a hand to hand conflict with the enemy, succeeded in capturing the colors of a Pennsylvania regiment. The good conduct
James Longstreet (search for this): chapter 6.41
d other supplies which the army needed. The brigade having accomplished its mission to my satisfaction rejoined the division at our camp near Carlisle. On the 29th June, in obedience to orders, I countermarched my division to Greenville, thence eastwardly by way of Scotland to Gettysburg — not arriving in time, however, to participate in the action of the 1st instant. The last day's march was twenty-five miles, rendered the more fatiguing because of obstruction caused by wagons of Longstreet's corps. Late on the night of July 1st I moved along the G. & Y. railroad to the northeast of the town and formed line of battle in a ravine in an open field — Nicholls' brigade on the right, next Jones', Steuart's and Walker's on the left; pickets were thrown well to the front, and the troops slept on their arms. Early next morning skirmishers from Walker's and Jones' brigades were advanced for the purpose of feeling the enemy, and desultory firing was maintained with their skirmish
E. J. Martin (search for this): chapter 6.41
lled within a short distance of the enemy's line. Major H. K. Douglas, Assistant Adjutant-General, was severely wounded while in the discharge of his duties, and is still a prisoner. My orderly, W. H. Webb, remained with me after being severely wounded. His conduct entitles him to a commission. Fewer wounded from my division were left in the hands of the enemy than from any other division of the army, for which I am indebted to the active exertion of Chief-Surgeon R. T. Coleman. Mr. E. J. Martin, my volunteer Aid-de-Camp, rendered valuable service by his prompt transmission of orders; and Major E. L. Moore faithfully performed his duties as Assistant Inspector-General. The troops are much indebted to Major T. E. Ballard and G. H. Kyle, of the Commissary Department, for supplies during the trying period covered by this report; cattle and flour were frequently procured within the enemy's lines. All of the officers and men of the division who came under my observation during
sburg, was disposed as follows: Archer's brigade in line of battle on the right of the turnpike; Davis' brigade on the left of the same road, also in line of battle; Pettigrew's brigade and Heth's old brigade, Colonel Brockenbrough commanding, were held in reserve. Archer and Davis were now directed to advance, the object being to feel the enemy; to make a forced reconnoissance, and determinered. Davis on the left advanced, driving the enemy before him and capturing his batteries. General Davis was unable to hold the position he had gained; the enemy concentrated on his front and flank and its ranks terribly thinned. Among the officers of his brigade, especially mentioned by General Davis as displaying conspicuous gallantry on this occasion, are noticed Colonel Stone, commanding bama regiment, commanding) on the right, Pettigrew in the centre and Brockenbrough on the left. Davis' brigade was kept on the left of the road, that it might collect its stragglers, and from its sh
anded respectively by Colonel Warren, Lieutenant-Colonel Walton, Major Wood, Lieutenant-Colonel Brown, Major Parsley and Lieutenant-Colonel Herbert; Nicholls' brigade, Colonel J. M. Williams commanding, consisting of First, Second, Tenth, Fourteenth and Fifteenth Louisiana regiments, commanded respectively by Lieutenant-Colonel Nolan, Lieutenant-Colonel Burke, Major Powell, Lieutenant-Colonel Zable and Major Brady, with Andrews' battalion of artillery, Major Latimer commanding, consisting of Raines', Dement's, Brown's and Carpenter's batteries. On June 16th my division left camp at Stephenson's and marched to Sbepherdstown, where Jones' brigade was temporarily detached, with orders to destroy a number of canal boats and a quantity of grain and flour stored at different points, and cut the canal (Chesapeake and Ohio canal). A report of his operations and the disposition made of his captures has been forwarded. June 18th we crossed the Potomac at Boteler's ford and encamped upon
J. M. Brockenbrough (search for this): chapter 6.41
ft of the same road, also in line of battle; Pettigrew's brigade and Heth's old brigade, Colonel Brockenbrough commanding, were held in reserve. Archer and Davis were now directed to advance, the . D. Fry, Thirteenth Alabama regiment, commanding) on the right, Pettigrew in the centre and Brockenbrough on the left. Davis' brigade was kept on the left of the road, that it might collect its stry engaged. The enemy was steadily driven before it at all points, except on the left, where Brockenbrough was held in check for a short time, but finally succeeded in driving the enemy before him in confusion. Brockenbrough's brigade behaved with its usual gallantry, capturing two stands of colors and a number of prisoners. The officer who made the report of the part taken by BrockenbrougBrockenbrough's brigade in this day's fight, has ommitted to mention the names of the officers and soldiers who distinguished themselves on this occasion. Pettigrew's brigade encountered the enemy in heavy fo
J. A. Early (search for this): chapter 6.41
ne of breastworks which had been taken the night previous, but was repulsed with great slaughter. Daniel's and Rodes' brigade (Colonel O'Neal commanding) of Rodes' division having reported to me, two other assualts were made; both failed — the enemy were too securely entrenched and in too great number to be dislodged by the force at my command. In the meantime, a demonstration in force was made upon my left and rear. The Second Virginia regiment, Stonewall brigade and Smith's brigade of Early's division were disposed to meet and check it, which was accomplished to my entire satisfaction. No further assualt was made; all had been done that it was possible to do. I held my original position until ten o'clock of the night of the 3d, when, in accordance with orders, I withdrew to the hill north and west of Gettysburg, where we remained until the following day in the hope that the enemy would give us battle on ground of our own selection. My loss in this terrible battle was heav
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