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Edward Johnson (search for this): chapter 6.41
ich we have not yet published, so that our Papers may contain the full official history of the Confederate operations in that great campaign. Report of General Edward Johnson. headquarters Johnson's division, September 30th, 1863. Major — I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of my division fJohnson's division, September 30th, 1863. Major — I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of my division from June 15th to July 31st, 1863, embracing the campaign in Pennsylvania and battle of Gettysburg. My division comprised the Stonewall brigade, Brigadier-Gen-J. A. Walker, consisting of the Second, Fourth, Fifth, Twenty-seventh and Thirty-third Virginia regiments, commanded respectively by Colonel Nadenbousch, Major Terry, Colonthe operations around Gettysburg were-- Killed,219 Wounded,1,229 Missing,375   Total,1,823 I am, Major, with great respect, your obedient servant, Edward Johnson, Major-General. Report of Major-General H. Heth. headquarters Heth's division, Camp near Orange Courthouse, September 13, 1863. Captain — I have t
ren, Lieutenant-Colonel Walton, Major Wood, Lieutenant-Colonel Brown, Major Parsley and Lieutenant-Colonel Herbert; Nicholls' brigade, Colonel J. M. Williams commanding, consisting of First, Second, Tenth, Fourteenth and Fifteenth Louisiana regiments, commanded respectively by Lieutenant-Colonel Nolan, Lieutenant-Colonel Burke, Major Powell, Lieutenant-Colonel Zable and Major Brady, with Andrews' battalion of artillery, Major Latimer commanding, consisting of Raines', Dement's, Brown's and Carpenter's batteries. On June 16th my division left camp at Stephenson's and marched to Sbepherdstown, where Jones' brigade was temporarily detached, with orders to destroy a number of canal boats and a quantity of grain and flour stored at different points, and cut the canal (Chesapeake and Ohio canal). A report of his operations and the disposition made of his captures has been forwarded. June 18th we crossed the Potomac at Boteler's ford and encamped upon the battle-ground of Sharpsburg
  Total,1,823 I am, Major, with great respect, your obedient servant, Edward Johnson, Major-General. Report of Major-General H. Heth. headquarters Heth's division, Camp near Orange Courthouse, September 13, 1863. Captain — I have the honor to report the operations of my division from the 29th June until the 1stlows: Archer's brigade in line of battle on the right of the turnpike; Davis' brigade on the left of the same road, also in line of battle; Pettigrew's brigade and Heth's old brigade, Colonel Brockenbrough commanding, were held in reserve. Archer and Davis were now directed to advance, the object being to feel the enemy; to maky. My thanks are also due to my personal staff--Major Finney, Assistant Adjutant-General; Major Harrison, Adjutant and Inspector-General; Lieutenants Selden and Heth, my Aids-de-Camp, and Acting Engineer-Officer William O. Slade--for their valuable services in conveying orders and superintending their execution. I take this
Francis H. Smith (search for this): chapter 6.41
odged by the force at my command. In the meantime, a demonstration in force was made upon my left and rear. The Second Virginia regiment, Stonewall brigade and Smith's brigade of Early's division were disposed to meet and check it, which was accomplished to my entire satisfaction. No further assualt was made; all had been do regimental commanders herewith transmitted. I take pleasure in bearing testimony to the gallantry of Brigadier-General Daniel and Colonel O'Neal, and to Brigadier-General Smith and their brigades while under my command. We marched on the 5th across the mountain by Waynesboroa towards Hagerstown, and remained for a few days wit; Lieutenant-Colonel Moseley and Major Feeny, Forty-second Mississippi regiment, severely wounded while gallantly leading their regiments to the charge. Lieutenant-Colonel Smith, of the Fifty-fifth North Carolina regiment, was at the same time killed, as also was the gallant Lieutenant Roberts, of the Second Mississippi regiment,
for him a reputation to be envied by his seniors,--received a severe wound on the evening of the 2d, from the effects of which he has since died. Major B. W. Leigh, my Chief of Staff, whose concientious discharge of duty, superior attainments and noble bearing made him invaluable to me, was killed within a short distance of the enemy's line. Major H. K. Douglas, Assistant Adjutant-General, was severely wounded while in the discharge of his duties, and is still a prisoner. My orderly, W. H. Webb, remained with me after being severely wounded. His conduct entitles him to a commission. Fewer wounded from my division were left in the hands of the enemy than from any other division of the army, for which I am indebted to the active exertion of Chief-Surgeon R. T. Coleman. Mr. E. J. Martin, my volunteer Aid-de-Camp, rendered valuable service by his prompt transmission of orders; and Major E. L. Moore faithfully performed his duties as Assistant Inspector-General. The troops are
J. Johnston Pettigrew (search for this): chapter 6.41
On the morning of the 30th of June, I ordered Brigadier-General Pettigrew to take his brigade to Gettysburg, search the to the same day. On reaching the suburbs of Gettysburg, General Pettigrew found a large force of cavalry near the town, supportnd returned, as directed, to Cashtown. The result of General Pettigrew's observations was reported to Lieutenant-General Hilade on the left of the same road, also in line of battle; Pettigrew's brigade and Heth's old brigade, Colonel Brockenbrough cy, Thirteenth Alabama regiment, commanding) on the right, Pettigrew in the centre and Brockenbrough on the left. Davis' brigoldiers who distinguished themselves on this occasion. Pettigrew's brigade encountered the enemy in heavy force and broke s. These regiments behaved to my entire satisfaction. Pettigrew's brigade, under the leadership of that gallant officer and accomplished scholar, Brigadier-General J. Johnston Pettigrew (now lost to his country), fought as well and displayed as h
A. F. Brown (search for this): chapter 6.41
t's brigade, consisting of Tenth, Twenty-third and Thirty-seventh Virginia regiments, First Maryland battalion and First and Third North Carolina regiments, commanded respectively by Colonel Warren, Lieutenant-Colonel Walton, Major Wood, Lieutenant-Colonel Brown, Major Parsley and Lieutenant-Colonel Herbert; Nicholls' brigade, Colonel J. M. Williams commanding, consisting of First, Second, Tenth, Fourteenth and Fifteenth Louisiana regiments, commanded respectively by Lieutenant-Colonel Nolan, Lieutenant-Colonel Burke, Major Powell, Lieutenant-Colonel Zable and Major Brady, with Andrews' battalion of artillery, Major Latimer commanding, consisting of Raines', Dement's, Brown's and Carpenter's batteries. On June 16th my division left camp at Stephenson's and marched to Sbepherdstown, where Jones' brigade was temporarily detached, with orders to destroy a number of canal boats and a quantity of grain and flour stored at different points, and cut the canal (Chesapeake and Ohio canal).
R. T. Coleman (search for this): chapter 6.41
nvaluable to me, was killed within a short distance of the enemy's line. Major H. K. Douglas, Assistant Adjutant-General, was severely wounded while in the discharge of his duties, and is still a prisoner. My orderly, W. H. Webb, remained with me after being severely wounded. His conduct entitles him to a commission. Fewer wounded from my division were left in the hands of the enemy than from any other division of the army, for which I am indebted to the active exertion of Chief-Surgeon R. T. Coleman. Mr. E. J. Martin, my volunteer Aid-de-Camp, rendered valuable service by his prompt transmission of orders; and Major E. L. Moore faithfully performed his duties as Assistant Inspector-General. The troops are much indebted to Major T. E. Ballard and G. H. Kyle, of the Commissary Department, for supplies during the trying period covered by this report; cattle and flour were frequently procured within the enemy's lines. All of the officers and men of the division who came und
encountered. Davis on the left advanced, driving the enemy before him and capturing his batteries. General Davis was unable to hold the position he had gained; the enemy concentrated on his front and flanks an overwhelming force. The brigade maintained its position until every field officer save two were shot down, and its ranks terribly thinned. Among the officers of his brigade, especially mentioned by General Davis as displaying conspicuous gallantry on this occasion, are noticed Colonel Stone, commanding Second Mississippi regiment; Colonel Connally, commanding Fifty-fifth North Carolina regiment; Major Belo, Fifty-fifth North Carolina regiment; Lieutenant-Colonel Moseley and Major Feeny, Forty-second Mississippi regiment, severely wounded while gallantly leading their regiments to the charge. Lieutenant-Colonel Smith, of the Fifty-fifth North Carolina regiment, was at the same time killed, as also was the gallant Lieutenant Roberts, of the Second Mississippi regiment, who,
my was in the vicinity of the town in some force. It may not be improper to remark that at this time--9 o'clock on the morning of the 1st of July--I was ignorant what force was at or near Gettysburg, and supposed it consisted of cavalry, most probably supported by a brigade or two of infantry. On reaching the summit of the second ridge of hills west of Gettysburg, it became evident that there was cavalry, infantry and artillery in and around the town. A few shot from Pegram's battalion (Marye's battery) scattered the cavalry videttes. One of the first shells fired by Pegram mortally wounded Major-General Reynolds, then in command of the force at Gettysburg. My division, now within a mile of Gettysburg, was disposed as follows: Archer's brigade in line of battle on the right of the turnpike; Davis' brigade on the left of the same road, also in line of battle; Pettigrew's brigade and Heth's old brigade, Colonel Brockenbrough commanding, were held in reserve. Archer and Davis
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