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W. S. Hancock (search for this): chapter 2.5
de commanders on the left. It was to throw a force upon the flank and rear of Hancock, and at the same time advance our right and assail his front, so as to roll upat the successful execution of such a movement would not only have disposed of Hancock for the day, but would have thrown a powerful force perpendicular to General Gdy in position for the flank attack, whose spectre seems to have been haunting Hancock from the beginning. No wonder, it was so near Chancellorsville. A yell and a The firing ceases, and the victory, almost won, slips from our grasp. When Hancock's left had been shattered and driven back, General Longstreet conceived the den they were connected with the movements of my own command. The report of General Hancock, however, although the uglier features of his situation are doubtless tonede's corps, probably one or both of the divisions with which he had reinforced Hancock the night before. Considering their numbers, their effort has always seemed t
C. M. Wilcox (search for this): chapter 2.5
De Saix at Marengo, in one of those great crises, which few men are ever called upon to meet twice in a lifetime. Heth was far to the rear; the last battalion of Wilcox had broken just as the head of his column reached the point where stood General Lee, like a pillar of cloud, the only remaining obstacle to stay the surging billoended its strength? Oh, for a fresh division, to be hurled upon that shattered, reeling flank! But no; there are no reserves. Heth has not yet reorganized, and Wilcox has moved far to the left to open communication with Ewell. The firing ceases, and the victory, almost won, slips from our grasp. When Hancock's left had beenve for several hours. There were no troops in communication with General Perry's left. There was a gap — I know not how wide — between him and the troops of General Wilcox, sent in that direction after the arrival of Longstreet's corps. Though not charged with the care of this exposed flank, I felt solicitude enough in regard t
W. M. Robbins (search for this): chapter 2.5
nth Alabama and the Twentieth Georgia regiments, which had reformed farther to the rear. Shortly afterwards General Field approached and said: this is all of my command that I can find. I was soon afterwards ordered to the left, passed General Perrin's brigade of Alabamians forming line on the crest, and rejoined you with the Fifteenth, Forty-fourth and the Forty-eighth. In this engagement and that which followed late in the evening, I lost considerably over half my men, among them Major W. M. Robbins wounded. This graphic account of Colonel Bowles explains the severe loss of the Texas and Georgia brigades on the same ground, and the impossibility of holding an advanced position on the Plank road until the Federal troops on the south of it had been driven back. On gaining the crest with my center and left regiments, I sent a staff officer to General Lee with instructions to say that I had driven back several lines of the enemy, and had carried the heights beyond the swamp; bu
the enemy ceased firing and advanced upon me. We met them with a counter charge, Major Campbell following with the Forty-seventh. We advanced two hundred yards or more through a hailstorm of lead, and found ourselves on a second line of logs. The Plank road was in view all the time. We had been here but a short time when it became evident that the enemy south of the Plank road had passed our right flank, and a heavy fire from that direction was soon opened. About the same time Lieutenant-Colonel Scruggs came to me and reported that the Forty-seventh had given way, and that the enemy were pressing by my left flank also. I immediately ordered a retreat. The enemy saw it and advanced rapidly, delivering a severe fire. We reached the first line of works referred to above, and my men were quickly reformed, the Forty-seventh taking position on my left. The enemy had reformed also, and were evidently preparing to advance upon us. I resolved to anticipate them, and ordered the Fourth
Leigh Robinson (search for this): chapter 2.5
ation of the troops; and finally that it was thought advisable to withdraw the troops and reform in the breastworks. But for the misfortune to Longstreet, it is probable he would have had a lively time reforming. Mr. Swinton, as quoted by Mr. Leigh Robinson, writes: It seemed indeed that irretrievable disaster was upon us; but in the very torrent and tempest of the attack, it suddenly ceased, and all was still. And again: But in the very fury and tempest of the Confederate onset, the advance general break. * * Stragglers for the first time streamed to the rear in large numbers, choking the roads, and causing a panic by their stampede. It was even reported at headquarters that the enemy had broken entirely through. Quoted by Mr. Leigh Robinson. But again capricious Fortune snatches the victory from their grasp. Neither a Jackson nor a Longstreet is there to seize the critical moment, and by a general advance to overwhelm the foe, now tottering on the verge of ruin. The assa
ing fifteen hundred men rank and file. Battle of the Wilderness. When General Grant began his advance from Culpeper, two divisions of General Longstreet's corpck in confusion eight full divisions of the enemy, constituting one-half of General Grant's vast army! His own corps of four divisions, two divisions of Burnside'ch commander to double back the wing of the opposing force. The success of General Grant would have opened an unobstructed road to Richmond, and might have been decorsville a year before. It would at least have interposed his army between General Grant and his objective point. The arrival of Longstreet's corps and Anderson's division defeated the plan of Grant, and threw him on the defensive. The effort of General Lee was still to come. The plan of attack was made known by officers of ancock for the day, but would have thrown a powerful force perpendicular to General Grant's centre and right wing, already confronted by General Ewell. There is a
Frank's brigade was swept away; that Mott's division was thrown into confusion; that he endeavored to restore order, and reform his line of battle by throwing back his left, so as to rest it upon the Brock road; that he was unable to effect this, owing to the partial disorganization of the troops; and finally that it was thought advisable to withdraw the troops and reform in the breastworks. But for the misfortune to Longstreet, it is probable he would have had a lively time reforming. Mr. Swinton, as quoted by Mr. Leigh Robinson, writes: It seemed indeed that irretrievable disaster was upon us; but in the very torrent and tempest of the attack, it suddenly ceased, and all was still. And again: But in the very fury and tempest of the Confederate onset, the advance was of a sudden stayed by a cause at the moment unknown. This afterwards proved to have been the fall of the head of the attack. The three brigades on the left now remained inactive for several hours. There were no
nd are glad to be able to publish this sketch of the battle of the Wilderness, by General Perry, and to have the assurance that he will follow it up by other sketches of the same campaign.] It was my fortune to command Law's brigade of Field's division, Longstreet's corps, during the greater part of the year 1864--first as its senior colonel, and afterwards as its permanent commander. The report which was made in August of the part taken by my command in the great military operations of May and June, will doubtless never see the light. The copy which I retained was lost during the retreat to Appomattox. The brigade happened on several important occasions to be thrown at critical points where much depended upon its behavior; and under circumstances where no eyes but those of its immediate commander were upon it, it performed deeds that deserve, at least, to be rescued from oblivion. It is from a desire to render, even at this late day, a merited tribute to the highest soldierl
Reminiscences of the campaign of 1864 in Virginia. By General William F. Perry. No. 1. [We are anxious to get material for the history of the campaign of 1864, and are glad to be able to publish this sketch of the battle of the Wilderness, by1864, and are glad to be able to publish this sketch of the battle of the Wilderness, by General Perry, and to have the assurance that he will follow it up by other sketches of the same campaign.] It was my fortune to command Law's brigade of Field's division, Longstreet's corps, during the greater part of the year 1864--first as i1864--first as its senior colonel, and afterwards as its permanent commander. The report which was made in August of the part taken by my command in the great military operations of May and June, will doubtless never see the light. The copy which I retained was lo aimed by a master's hand, still remained to be delivered from Ewell's left, to close the first act of the bloody drama of 1864, and to consign the battle of the Wilderness to history. When the Muse of history shall have done her complete work, th
a, under Lieutenant-Colonel John A. Jones. The Forty-seventh Alabama, under Major J. M. Campbell. The Forty-eighth Alabama, under Major J. W. Wigginton. The brigade numbered not exceeding fifteen hundred men rank and file. Battle of the Wilderness. When General Grant began his advance from Culpeper, two divisions of General Longstreet's corps, Kershaw's and Field's, were in the neighborhood of Gordonsville, having recently arrived from east Tennessee. The march began on the 4th of May, I believe, about 2 o'clock. After dark on the evening of the 5th the troops went into camp nearly ten miles, as the road ran, from the point on the Plank road at which General A. P. Hill's corps had been engaged that evening. About midnight the men were aroused by marching orders, and the corps moved off, Kershaw's division in front. It was probably 2 o'clock A. M. when my brigade left camp. The progress made before light was slow. The night was dark, and we seemed to be on a narrow
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