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Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
Church of that place. In all my childhood and youth I had what I regard as the best possible opportunities for education, in excellent public schools where the rudiments of English were taught with great thoroughness, in a fair amount of all kinds of manly sports, and in hard work, mainly on the farm and in building a new home, which left no time and little inclination for any kind of mischief. At sixteen years of age I spent three months in surveying public lands in the wilds of northern Wisconsin, and at seventeen taught district school in the little town of Oneco. By that time I had chosen the law as my profession, and was working hard to complete the preparatory studies at my own expense. The winter school term in Oneco having closed early in the spring of 1849, I returned to Freeport and resumed my struggle with Latin. Then an unforeseen event turned the course of my life. The young man who had been appointed to West Point from our district only a year or two before ha
Bristol, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
B. Hood Robert E. Lee. I was born in the town of Gerry, Chautauqua County, New York, September 29, 1831. My father was the Rev. James Schofield, who was then pastor of the Baptist Church in Sinclairville, and who was from 1843 to 1881 a home missionary engaged in organizing new churches, and building meeting-houses, in Illinois, Iowa, and Missouri. My mother was Caroline McAllister, daughter of John McAllister of Gerry. We removed to Illinois in June, 1843, and, after a short stay in Bristol, my father made a new home for his family in Freeport, where he began his missionary work by founding the First Baptist Church of that place. In all my childhood and youth I had what I regard as the best possible opportunities for education, in excellent public schools where the rudiments of English were taught with great thoroughness, in a fair amount of all kinds of manly sports, and in hard work, mainly on the farm and in building a new home, which left no time and little inclination
Cold Spring, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
. Bonaparte loaned me to pay my way. But I went to the city and back, in perfect safety, between the two roll-calls I had to attend that day. Old Benny Havens of blessed memory rowed me across the river to Garrison's, and the Cold Spring ferryman back to the Point a few minutes before evening parade. I walked across the plain in full view of the crowd of officers and ladies, and appeared in ranks at roll-call, as innocent as anybody. It is true my up-train did not stop at Garrison's or Cold Spring, but the conductor, upon a hint as to the necessity of the case, kindly slacked the speed of the express so that I could jump off from the rear platform. In due time I repaid Bonaparte the borrowed five dollars, but the wager was never paid. The only other bet I made at West Point was on Buchanan's election; but that was in the interest of a Yankee who was not on speaking terms with the Southerner who offered the wager. I have never had any disposition to wager anything on chance, but
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
estored to the academy. I returned to West Point, and went through the long forms of a court of inquiry, a court martial, and the waiting for the final action of the War Department, all occupying some five or six months, diligently attending to my military and academic duties, and trying hard to obey all the regulations (except as to smoking), never for a moment doubting the final result. That lesson taught me that innocence and justice sometimes need powerful backing. Implicit trust in Providence does not seem to justify any neglect to employ also the biggest battalions and the heaviest guns. During all that time I continued to live with my old room-mate, James B. McPherson, in a tower room and an adjoining bedroom, which La Rhett L. Livingston also shared. I had been corporal, sergeant, and lieutenant up to the time of my dismissal; hence the duties of private were a little difficult, and I found it hard to avoid demerits; but with some help from our kind-hearted inspecting o
West Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
Parentage and early life appointment to West Point Virginian room Mates acquaintance with Gefe. The young man who had been appointed to West Point from our district only a year or two before ved a boy with that record could get through West Point, the training there being, in his opinion, ach was sold to fit me out for my journey to West Point, including some inexpensive visits en route.nkees. In that remark I found my mission at West Point, as in after life, to be, as far as possibleght have been preserved. My experience at West Point did not differ in many particulars from the r this long experience, that nothing else at West Point was either so enjoyable or so beneficial to ependent thought are the best ever devised. West Point training of the mind is practically perfect.as never paid. The only other bet I made at West Point was on Buchanan's election; but that was in saying: It is all right. You can go back to West Point. The Secretary has given me his promise. I[3 more...]
Freeport (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ing meeting-houses, in Illinois, Iowa, and Missouri. My mother was Caroline McAllister, daughter of John McAllister of Gerry. We removed to Illinois in June, 1843, and, after a short stay in Bristol, my father made a new home for his family in Freeport, where he began his missionary work by founding the First Baptist Church of that place. In all my childhood and youth I had what I regard as the best possible opportunities for education, in excellent public schools where the rudiments of Enghe little town of Oneco. By that time I had chosen the law as my profession, and was working hard to complete the preparatory studies at my own expense. The winter school term in Oneco having closed early in the spring of 1849, I returned to Freeport and resumed my struggle with Latin. Then an unforeseen event turned the course of my life. The young man who had been appointed to West Point from our district only a year or two before had failed to continue his course in the Military Academy
Oneco (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ew home, which left no time and little inclination for any kind of mischief. At sixteen years of age I spent three months in surveying public lands in the wilds of northern Wisconsin, and at seventeen taught district school in the little town of Oneco. By that time I had chosen the law as my profession, and was working hard to complete the preparatory studies at my own expense. The winter school term in Oneco having closed early in the spring of 1849, I returned to Freeport and resumed my Oneco having closed early in the spring of 1849, I returned to Freeport and resumed my struggle with Latin. Then an unforeseen event turned the course of my life. The young man who had been appointed to West Point from our district only a year or two before had failed to continue his course in the Military Academy. Thus a vacancy occurred just at the close of Mr. Thomas J. Turner's term in Congress. There was no time for applications or for consultation. He must select another candidate to enter the following June, or leave the place to be filled by his successor. Fortunate
Fort Clinton (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
d, and I was laid up in the hospital during the remainder of the encampment. On that account I had a hard struggle with my studies the next year. While sitting on the east porch of the hospital in the afternoon, I attracted the kind attention of General Winfield Scott, who became from that time a real friend, and did me a great service some years later. In our third-class encampment, when corporal of the guard, I had a little misunderstanding one night with the sentinel on post along Fort Clinton ditch, which was then nearly filled by a growth of bushes. The sentinel tore the breast of my shell-jacket with the point of his bayonet, and I tumbled him over backward into the ditch and ruined his musket. But I quickly helped him out, and gave him my musket in place of his, with ample apologies for my thoughtless act. We parted, as I thought, in the best of feeling; but many years later, a colonel in the army told me that story, as an illustration of the erroneous treatment sometimes
Gerry (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
Chapter I Parentage and early life appointment to West Point Virginian room Mates acquaintance with General Winfield Scott character of the West Point training importance of learning how to obey a trip to New York on a wager the West Point Bible class dismissed from the Academy without trial intercession of Stephen A. Douglas restoration to Cadet duty James B. McPherson John B. Hood Robert E. Lee. I was born in the town of Gerry, Chautauqua County, New York, September 29, 1831. My father was the Rev. James Schofield, who was then pastor of the Baptist Church in Sinclairville, and who was from 1843 to 1881 a home missionary engaged in organizing new churches, and building meeting-houses, in Illinois, Iowa, and Missouri. My mother was Caroline McAllister, daughter of John McAllister of Gerry. We removed to Illinois in June, 1843, and, after a short stay in Bristol, my father made a new home for his family in Freeport, where he began his missionary work by
Sinclairville (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ance with General Winfield Scott character of the West Point training importance of learning how to obey a trip to New York on a wager the West Point Bible class dismissed from the Academy without trial intercession of Stephen A. Douglas restoration to Cadet duty James B. McPherson John B. Hood Robert E. Lee. I was born in the town of Gerry, Chautauqua County, New York, September 29, 1831. My father was the Rev. James Schofield, who was then pastor of the Baptist Church in Sinclairville, and who was from 1843 to 1881 a home missionary engaged in organizing new churches, and building meeting-houses, in Illinois, Iowa, and Missouri. My mother was Caroline McAllister, daughter of John McAllister of Gerry. We removed to Illinois in June, 1843, and, after a short stay in Bristol, my father made a new home for his family in Freeport, where he began his missionary work by founding the First Baptist Church of that place. In all my childhood and youth I had what I regard as
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