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ery bookkeeper and lettercarrier and messenger and porter in the public offices ought to be a free-trader is as wise as to say that if a merchant is a Baptist every clerk in his office ought to be a believer in total immersion. But the officer of whom I spoke undoubtedly expressed the general feeling. The necessarily evil consequences of the practice which he justified seemed to be still speculative and inferential, and to the national indifference which followed the war the demand of Mr. Jenckes for reform appeared to be a mere whimsical vagary most inopportunely introduced. It was, however, soon evident that the war had made the necessity of reform imperative, and chiefly for two reasons: First, the enormous increase of patronage, and, second, the fact that circumstances had largely identified a party name with patriotism. The great and radical evil of the spoils system was carefully fostered by the apparent absolute necessity to the public welfare of making political opinio
n said, in a public speech, that General Taylor would be faithless to the Whig party if he did not proscribe Democrats. So high the deluge had risen which has ravaged and wasted our politics ever since, and the danger will be stayed only when every President, leaning upon the law, shall stand fast where John Quincy Adams stood. But the debate continued during the whole Jackson administration. In the Senate and on the stump, in elaborate reports and popular speeches, Webster, Calhoun, and Clay, the great political chiefs of their time, sought to alarm the country with the dangers of patronage. Sargent S. Prentiss, in the House of Representatives, caught up and echoed the cry under the administration of Van Buren. But the country refused to be alarmed. . . . It heard the uproar like the old lady upon her first railroad journey, who sat serene amid the wreck of a collision, and, when asked if she was very much hurt, looked over her spectacles and answered blandly, Hurt? Why, I
24, 1824; became a member of the Brook farm Association (q. v.) in 1842. In 1846 he went abroad, and, after spending a year in Italy, entered the University of Berlin, where he saw the revolutionary movements of 1848. He spent two years in travelling in George William Curtis. Europe, Egypt, and Syria, returning to the United States in 1850, in which year he published Nile notes of a Howadji. He joined the editorial staff of the New York Tribune, and was one of the original editors of Putnam's monthly. He was for many years an eloquent and successful lyceum lecturer, and was generally regarded as one of the most accomplished orators in the United States. In 1867 he became editor of Harper's weekly, and was extremely influential. In his writings and speeches he was a very efficient supporter of the Republican party for nearly a generation. He contributed a vast number of very able short essays through Harper's monthly, in the department of The easy chair. In 1871 President G
ples of all his predecessors. He followed Washington, and observed the spirit of the Constitution in refusing to remove for ally reason but official misconduct or incapacity. But he knew well what was coming, and with characteristically stinging sarcasm he called General Jackson's inaugural address a threat of reform. With Jackson's administration in 1830 the deluge of the spoils system burst over our national politics. Sixteen years later, Mr. Buchanan said, in a public speech, that General Taylor would be faithless to the Whig party if he did not proscribe Democrats. So high the deluge had risen which has ravaged and wasted our politics ever since, and the danger will be stayed only when every President, leaning upon the law, shall stand fast where John Quincy Adams stood. But the debate continued during the whole Jackson administration. In the Senate and on the stump, in elaborate reports and popular speeches, Webster, Calhoun, and Clay, the great political chiefs of their
Curtis, George William 1824- Editor; born in Providence, R. I., Feb. 24, 1824; became a member of the Brook farm Association (q. v.) in 1842. In 1846 he went abroad, and, after spending a year in Italy, entered the University of Berlin, where he saw the revolutionary movements of 1848. He spent two years in travelling in George William Curtis. Europe, Egypt, and Syria, returning to the United States in 1850, in which year he published Nile notes of a Howadji. He joined the editorial staff of the New York Tribune, and was one of the original editors of Putnam's monthly. He was for many years an eloquent and successful lyceum lecturer, and was generally regarded as one of the most accomplished orators in the United States. In 1867 he became editor of Harper's weekly, and was extremely influential. In his writings and speeches he was a very efficient supporter of the Republican party for nearly a generation. He contributed a vast number of very able short essays through H
September 8th, 1881 AD (search for this): entry curtis-george-william
regulation of the civil service. He was a member of the constitutional convention of the State of New York in 1868, in which he was chairman of the committee on education. In 1864 he was appointed one of the regents of the University of the State of New York. He died Aug. 31, 1892. The spoils system. The following is an abridgment of his celebrated speech on the evils of the spoils system in politics, delivered before the American Social Science Association, in Saratoga, N. Y., Sept. 8, 1881: The spoils spirit struggled desperately to obtain possession of the national administration from the day of Jefferson's inauguration to that of Jackson's, when it succeeded. Its first great but undesigned triumph was the decision of the first Congress, in 1789, vesting the sole power of removal in the President, a decision which placed almost every position in the civil service unconditionally at his pleasure. This decision was determined by the weight of Madison's authority. B
Curtis, George William 1824- Editor; born in Providence, R. I., Feb. 24, 1824; became a member of the Brook farm Association (q. v.) in 1842. In 1846 he went abroad, and, after spending a year in Italy, entered the University of Berlin, where he saw the revolutionary movements of 1848. He spent two years in travelling in George William Curtis. Europe, Egypt, and Syria, returning to the United States in 1850, in which year he published Nile notes of a Howadji. He joined the editorial staff of the New York Tribune, and was one of the original editors of Putnam's monthly. He was for many years an eloquent and successful lyceum lecturer, and was generally regarded as one of the most accomplished orators in the United States. In 1867 he became editor of Harper's weekly, and was extremely influential. In his writings and speeches he was a very efficient supporter of the Republican party for nearly a generation. He contributed a vast number of very able short essays through H
Curtis, George William 1824- Editor; born in Providence, R. I., Feb. 24, 1824; became a member of the Brook farm Association (q. v.) in 1842. In 1846 he went abroad, and, after spending a year in Italy, entered the University of Berlin, where he saw the revolutionary movements of 1848. He spent two years in travelling in George William Curtis. Europe, Egypt, and Syria, returning to the United States in 1850, in which year he published Nile notes of a Howadji. He joined the editorial staff of the New York Tribune, and was one of the original editors of Putnam's monthly. He was for many years an eloquent and successful lyceum lecturer, and was generally regarded as one of the most accomplished orators in the United States. In 1867 he became editor of Harper's weekly, and was extremely influential. In his writings and speeches he was a very efficient supporter of the Republican party for nearly a generation. He contributed a vast number of very able short essays through H
editors of Putnam's monthly. He was for many years an eloquent and successful lyceum lecturer, and was generally regarded as one of the most accomplished orators in the United States. In 1867 he became editor of Harper's weekly, and was extremely influential. In his writings and speeches he was a very efficient supporter of the Republican party for nearly a generation. He contributed a vast number of very able short essays through Harper's monthly, in the department of The easy chair. In 1871 President Grant appointed Mr. Curtis one of a commission to draw up rules for the regulation of the civil service. He was a member of the constitutional convention of the State of New York in 1868, in which he was chairman of the committee on education. In 1864 he was appointed one of the regents of the University of the State of New York. He died Aug. 31, 1892. The spoils system. The following is an abridgment of his celebrated speech on the evils of the spoils system in politics, d
ecame editor of Harper's weekly, and was extremely influential. In his writings and speeches he was a very efficient supporter of the Republican party for nearly a generation. He contributed a vast number of very able short essays through Harper's monthly, in the department of The easy chair. In 1871 President Grant appointed Mr. Curtis one of a commission to draw up rules for the regulation of the civil service. He was a member of the constitutional convention of the State of New York in 1868, in which he was chairman of the committee on education. In 1864 he was appointed one of the regents of the University of the State of New York. He died Aug. 31, 1892. The spoils system. The following is an abridgment of his celebrated speech on the evils of the spoils system in politics, delivered before the American Social Science Association, in Saratoga, N. Y., Sept. 8, 1881: The spoils spirit struggled desperately to obtain possession of the national administration from the
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