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Groton (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
undred guns be fired on Boston Common, at twelve, meridian, on Tuesday, Jan. 8th inst., and a national salute be fired, at the same time, for the same purposes, in Charlestown, Lexington, Concord, Waltham, Roxbury, Marblehead, Newburyport, Salem, Groton, Lynn, Worcester, Greenfield, Northampton, Fall River, and Lowell. By command of His Excellency John A. Andrew, Governor and Commander-in-chief. William Schouler, Adjutant-General. The purpose of firing these salutes was to revive old pa. On the same day, Feb. 5, the Governor, with the consent of the Council, appointed the following named gentlemen as commissioners:— Hon. John Z. Goodrich, of Stockbridge. Hon. Charles Allen, of Worcester. Hon. George S. Boutwell, of Groton. Hon. Francis B. Crowninshield, of Boston. Theophilus P. Chandler, Esq., of Brookline. John M. Forbes, Esq., of Milton. Richard P. Waters, Esq., of Beverly. These gentleman immediately proceeded to Washington, and took part in the
Bristol, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ulties. Referred to the Committee on Federal Relations, and ordered to be printed. Jan. 26. In Senate.—Mr. Davis, of Bristol, offered this order:— That the Committee on the Judiciary be instructed to forthwith report a bill authorizing thea new Administration that we can trust, he thought it would be time enough to talk about lending money. Mr. Davis, of Bristol, moved to amend the bill so that it would take effect immediately upon its passage. The amendment was carried, and the e debate in the Senate was very able: the proposition being sustained by Messrs. Northend and Stone, of Essex; Davis, of Bristol; and Hardy, of Norfolk; and opposed by Mr. Whiting, of Plymouth. The resolves passed,—yeas 24, nays 6. The bill providrcester, and advocated by Mr. Northend, of Essex, and Mr. Hardy, of Norfolk. It was finally, on motion of Mr. Davis, of Bristol, referred to the next Legislature. The session closed Thursday, April 11, 1861. The most important acts of the ses<
Attleboro, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
each, he finding the trimmings, except the buttons. 3d. With James Boyd & Sons, to make 1,000 knapsacks, army pattern, and with Edward A. G. Roulstone, to make 1,000 knapsacks, army pattern, severally at $1.88 each. 4th. With Converse, Harding, & Co., for 1,000 pairs of blankets, army size, at $3.75 a pair. 5th. With the Rubber Clothing Company, Beverly, for 2,000 haversacks, at 75 cents each. 6th. The buttons for the coats have been contracted for with the manufacturer at Attleborough, and will cost about $740. 7th. I was also authorized to contract for 200,000 ball-cartridges to suit the new rifled musket. The lowest market price for these cartridges is $14 a thousand. At the State Arsenal, at Cambridge, there have been for many years upwards of 200,000 musket-balls suitable for the old smooth-bore musket. I have caused these to be recast, and the cartridges made at the Arsenal; so that the entire cost to the Commonwealth for the 200,000 new musket cartridges w
Fort Independence (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
, the Governor was not idle. A constant correspondence was kept up with our members of Congress and the Governors of other States. Leading merchants, and other gentlemen of experience and wisdom, were daily consulted. The militia was strengthened. A cipher key was arranged, to be used in transmitting messages which required secrecy. The defenceless condition of the forts in Boston harbor was considered. In Fort Warren there was but one gun; in Fort Winthrop none at all; and, in Fort Independence, hardly twenty guns, and most of them were trained on the city itself. The casemates were unfit for human occupation. The grounds inside the forts were covered with workshops and wooden shanties; and, instead of being a defence to the city and harbor, the fortifications of Boston were a standing menace to them, and invited seizure by the enemy. The entire coast of Massachusetts was open to attack from sea; not a fort or an earthwork or a gun was in proper condition. There were neit
Newburyport (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
he leader of his party in the House. The leader of the opposition was Hon. Caleb Cushing, of Newburyport, formerly member of Congress, and the Attorney-General of the United States under President Pime, for the same purposes, in Charlestown, Lexington, Concord, Waltham, Roxbury, Marblehead, Newburyport, Salem, Groton, Lynn, Worcester, Greenfield, Northampton, Fall River, and Lowell. By commae for a force of 2,000 men, when in active service. In the House, same day, Mr. Coffin, of Newburyport, reported the Militia Bill in a new draft. Same day, the Governor sent a communication to hen, and by what officer, and under what authority. March 23. In the House.—Mr. Coffin, of Newburyport from the Committee on the Militia, reported that the resolve for the equipment of troops for others, and voting as their judgments dictated. Same day. In the House.—Colonel Coffin, of Newburyport, introduced a bill to limit the number of privates in infantry and rifle companies to fifty,
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ave of rebellion, which threatens to engulf the Government, overthrow democratic institutions, subject the people to the rule of a minority, if not of mere military despotism, and, in some communities, to endanger the very existence of civilized society, we cannot turn aside, and we will not turn back. It is to those of our brethren in the disaffected States, whose mouths are closed by a temporary reign of terror, not less than to ourselves, that we owe this labor, which, with the help of Providence, it is our duty to perform. I need not add, that whatever rights pertain to any person under the Constitution of the Union are secure in Massachusetts while the Union shall endure; and whatever authority or function pertains to the Federal Government for the maintenance of any such right is an authority or function which neither the Government nor the people of this Commonwealth can or would usurp, evade, or overthrow; and Massachusetts demands, and has a right to demand, that her siste
Annapolis (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ited-States magazines, arsenals, and depots of munitions of war and warlike stores, that they do not know yet what is left, and so cannot tell what we must bring with us. It is clear, that, if we move, it must be by sea, landing at Baltimore or Annapolis; that pilots must be secured in advance, as they will be seized by the secessionists; and that the ships must go to sea with sealed orders, while a false destination is publicly reported. I shall take the liberty to recommend one other cautit, to whom the purpose of his mission was made known, and he was referred to Colonel Keyes of General Scott's staff for information upon matters of detail. It was then arranged, that, in case of a call, the troops should be forwarded by sea to Annapolis or Baltimore. Colonel Keyes stated, that all other routes to Washington would be unsafe; that, for this reason, General Scott had placed an officer in command of Fort McHenry in Baltimore Harbor, upon whom he could rely to hold it to the utmos
Augusta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
f the dormant militia into activity; and to urge Governor Washburn to adopt the same policy for Maine. Leaving Boston on the evening of Saturday, Jan. 5, Colonel Browne, after an interview with Governor Goodwin, at Portsmouth on Sunday, reached Augusta on Jan. 7, and held his interview with Governor Washburn. By him, Adjutant-General John L. Hodsdon, and United States Senator Lot M. Morrill were called into consultation, and the answer was returned, that, wherever Massachusetts leads, Maine wwever, had another conversation with him yesterday morning, when he informed me that the answer given to his request for a detailed plan, was, in effect, that none such could be furnished at present. Some regulars, one company of artillery from Augusta, and one company of dragoons from Carlisle barracks, arrived yesterday; and, as I believe I mentioned in my first, a draft of infantry arrived at Washington in the train in which I reached the city. General Scott and Colonel Keyes are evident
Delaware (Delaware, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
vancing ideas, which, though scouted at in the early months of the war, were afterwards accepted by the nation, before the war could be brought to a successful end. Massachusetts is a small State, in territory and in population. With the exception of Maine, it lies the farthest eastward of all the States in the Union. Its capital is four hundred and fifty miles east of Washington, and is separated from it by the States of Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and Maryland. It contains seven thousand eight hundred square miles of land, river, lakes, and sea. In 1860, it had a population of 1,231,066, engaged in farming, manufacturing, fishing, and mercantile pursuits. Less than one-half the land is improved. It is about 1/380 part of the whole Union, ranking the thirty-sixth in size among the forty States and Territories. It is divided into fourteen counties, and three hundred and thirty-five cities and towns. Its governor, lieutenant-gover
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
territory and in population. With the exception of Maine, it lies the farthest eastward of all the States in the Union. Its capital is four hundred and fifty miles east of Washington, and is separated from it by the States of Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and Maryland. It contains seven thousand eight hundred square miles of land, river, lakes, and sea. In 1860, it had a population of 1,231,066, engaged in farming, manufacturing, fishing, and mercJanuary, the anniversary of General Jackson's victory at New Orleans. Colonel Wardrop, of New Bedford, Third Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, was sent to Governor Fairbanks, of Vermont; and other messengers were sent to Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Hampshire, and Maine, for this purpose. One of these messengers was the gentleman who afterwards became Governor Andrew's private military secretary,—Colonel Albert G. Browne, of Salem,—and who served him during the entire war; and who,
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