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Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
stor of the first church in the colony. The grandfather of Governor Andrew was a silversmith in Salem, who removed to Windham, where he died. His son Jonathan was born in Salem, and lived there untSalem, and lived there until manhood, when he also removed to Windham. There he married Miss Nancy G. Pierce, formerly preceptress of Fryeburg Academy, where Daniel Webster was once a teacher. These were the parents of GoveMarch, 1861. Oliver Warner, of Northampton, was elected Secretary of State; Henry K. Oliver, of Salem, Treasurer and Receiver-General; Dwight Foster, of Worcester, Attorney-General; and Levi Reed, owho afterwards became Governor Andrew's private military secretary,—Colonel Albert G. Browne, of Salem,—and who served him during the entire war; and who, for ability as a ready writer, truthfulness,he same purposes, in Charlestown, Lexington, Concord, Waltham, Roxbury, Marblehead, Newburyport, Salem, Groton, Lynn, Worcester, Greenfield, Northampton, Fall River, and Lowell. By command of His
Provincetown (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
solves for the appointment of commissioners were, on motion of Mr. Davis, of Greenfield, taken from the orders of the day, and considered. He said the resolves met with his entire approbation. Mr. Slocum, of Grafton, said, with all respect for Virginia, he could not abide by her opinions, since they might desecrate the soil of Massachusetts to slavery; rather than that, said he, let blood come. He moved an amendment. Mr. Wallis, of Bolton, favored the amendment. Mr. Gifford, of Provincetown, opposed it, and favored the resolutions. He had no fears that Massachusetts would act at the bidding of Virginia or any other State. Mr. French, of Waltham, favored the amendment, which was, in substance, that Massachusetts did not agree with Virginia that the Constitution required amendment to guarantee to each State its rights. Mr. Hyde, of Newton, opposed the amendment. He did not see any good reason why it should be adopted. He did not think Virginia needed to be told where
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
t occasion of public danger, the people of Massachusetts, confiding in the patriotism of their bretously selected to head the delegation from Massachusetts to the Republican National Convention at Ca far more important character. Maine and Massachusetts, being subject to a common State governmennd the answer was returned, that, wherever Massachusetts leads, Maine will follow close, if she canebate then arose upon passing the bill for Massachusetts to indorse the notes of the United States ns, since they might desecrate the soil of Massachusetts to slavery; rather than that, said he, lett contrary to the desires of the people of Massachusetts, and that this Commonwealth would be partly rejoice; but the sober second thought of Massachusetts will be, wasteful, unchristian, guilty. Tforesight of her Governor and Legislature, Massachusetts was better prepared for it than other loya strifes of battle. The common schools of Massachusetts were their Alma Mater. In their homes by [55 more...]
Boston Harbor (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
the public exigency might require. While the Legislature was considering and passing preparatory measures, the Governor was not idle. A constant correspondence was kept up with our members of Congress and the Governors of other States. Leading merchants, and other gentlemen of experience and wisdom, were daily consulted. The militia was strengthened. A cipher key was arranged, to be used in transmitting messages which required secrecy. The defenceless condition of the forts in Boston harbor was considered. In Fort Warren there was but one gun; in Fort Winthrop none at all; and, in Fort Independence, hardly twenty guns, and most of them were trained on the city itself. The casemates were unfit for human occupation. The grounds inside the forts were covered with workshops and wooden shanties; and, instead of being a defence to the city and harbor, the fortifications of Boston were a standing menace to them, and invited seizure by the enemy. The entire coast of Massachuset
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
nue, which, after debate, was rejected,—yeas 14, nays 19. The reason for rejecting the bill was stated by Mr. Hardy, of Norfolk. He did not like to have it put on record that old Massachusetts came to the Federal Government in the hour of distressing by a vote of 116 to 40. This bill, however, did not become a law. Jan. 30. In Senate.—On motion of Mr. Hardy, of Norfolk, the bill in relation to loaning the State credit to the United States, which was rejected yesterday, was reconsidered; was very able: the proposition being sustained by Messrs. Northend and Stone, of Essex; Davis, of Bristol; and Hardy, of Norfolk; and opposed by Mr. Whiting, of Plymouth. The resolves passed,—yeas 24, nays 6. The bill provided, that the commissioned by Mr. Whiting, of Plymouth, and Mr. Walker, of Worcester, and advocated by Mr. Northend, of Essex, and Mr. Hardy, of Norfolk. It was finally, on motion of Mr. Davis, of Bristol, referred to the next Legislature. The session closed Thursday, <
Queensborough (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
of the State for Mr. Seward until the final ballot, when it was thrown for Mr. Lincoln. That fall he was nominated by the Republican State Convention for Governor, and was elected by the majority we have already stated, in the largest popular vote ever cast in the State. This, in brief, was the life of Governor Andrew, up to the time he entered upon the duties of Governor of this Common-wealth. Associated with him on the ticket as Lieutenant-Governor was Hon. John Z. Goodrich, of West Stockbridge, who, being afterwards appointed Collector of the Port of Boston, resigned on the 29th of March, 1861. Oliver Warner, of Northampton, was elected Secretary of State; Henry K. Oliver, of Salem, Treasurer and Receiver-General; Dwight Foster, of Worcester, Attorney-General; and Levi Reed, of Abington, Auditor of Accounts. Jacob Sleeper, of Boston; John I. Baker, of Beverly; James M. Shute, of Somerville; Hugh M. Greene, of Northfield; Joel Hayden, of Williamsburg; James Ritchie, of Roxbu
Portsmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
safety of Washington was already threatened; that the policy of the Executive government of Massachusetts, under the new administration, would be to put its active militia into readiness at once for the impending crisis, and persuade the Legislature, if possible, to call part of the dormant militia into activity; and to urge Governor Washburn to adopt the same policy for Maine. Leaving Boston on the evening of Saturday, Jan. 5, Colonel Browne, after an interview with Governor Goodwin, at Portsmouth on Sunday, reached Augusta on Jan. 7, and held his interview with Governor Washburn. By him, Adjutant-General John L. Hodsdon, and United States Senator Lot M. Morrill were called into consultation, and the answer was returned, that, wherever Massachusetts leads, Maine will follow close, if she can't keep abreast. Thus Governor Andrew, on the very day of his inauguration, placed himself in confidential relations with each of the Governors of New England, which continued through the ent
Brookline (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
amp, each with the rank and title of lieutenant-colonel. Governor Andrew appointed, as his military aids, Horace Binney Sargent, of West Roxbury (senior aid); Harrison Ritchie, of Boston; John W. Wetherell, of Worcester; and Henry Lee, Jr., of Brookline. Colonel Sargent had served on the staff of Governor Banks. He remained on the staff of Governor Andrew until he was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of the First Regiment of Massachusetts Cavalry, in August, 1861, when Colonel Ritchie became following named gentlemen as commissioners:— Hon. John Z. Goodrich, of Stockbridge. Hon. Charles Allen, of Worcester. Hon. George S. Boutwell, of Groton. Hon. Francis B. Crowninshield, of Boston. Theophilus P. Chandler, Esq., of Brookline. John M. Forbes, Esq., of Milton. Richard P. Waters, Esq., of Beverly. These gentleman immediately proceeded to Washington, and took part in the deliberations of the Peace Congress. It was a very able delegation. There was great in
Massachusetts Bay (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
imperishable honor through the conflict. John A. Andrew was the twenty-first Governor of Massachusetts since the adoption of the Constitution of the State in 1780. He was born at Windham, in the District of Maine, about fifteen miles from Portland, on the 31st of May, 1818. The family was of English origin, descending from Robert Andrew, of Rowley village, now Boxford, Essex County, Mass., who died there in 1668. He was connected with most of the ancient families of the Colony of Massachusetts Bay. The grandmother of Governor Andrew was the grand-daughter of the brave Captain William Pickering, who commanded the Province Galley, in 1707, for the protection of the fisheries against the French and Indians; and the mother of her husband was Mary Higginson, a direct descendant of the Reverend Francis Higginson, the famous pastor of the first church in the colony. The grandfather of Governor Andrew was a silversmith in Salem, who removed to Windham, where he died. His son Jonathan
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1
n, for President and Vice-President of the United States, received about the same majority Mr. Andr The opinion of the Supreme Court of the United States, pronounced by Judge Story, himself a Masson any requisition of the President of the United States, to aid in the maintenance of the laws andsponse to the call of the President of the United States, that they be forthwith discharged; so thase and guarantee the treasury notes of the United States to the full amount of the surplus revenue elation to loaning the State credit to the United States, which was rejected yesterday, was reconsist of the Secretary of the Treasury of the United States, the treasury bonds of the United States tbill would indicate that the credit of the United States is not good, and we must indorse it to mak, on a requisition of the President of the United States upon the Commander-in-chief, to be marchedl the Northern and Western portions of the United States. Colonel Ritchie did not leave Washing[14 more...]
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