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Frederick Douglass (search for this): chapter 9
of Henry C. Wright, of Abby Kelley Foster, of Frederick Douglass, of Mr. Garrison--against whom his menaces wecall to order. There were now loud cries for Frederick Douglass, who came forward to where Rynders stood in twas somebody else's. Now you can speak, said he to Douglass; but mind what I say: if you speak disrespectfully man; you are only half a nigger. Then, replied Mr. Douglass, turning upon him with the blandest of smiles anRynders, a political adversary, he added a word to Douglass's against Greeley. I am happy, said Douglass, to Douglass, to have the assent of my half-brother here, pointing to Rynders, and convulsing the audience with laughter. Afte to interrupt the speaker. It's of no use, said Mr. Douglass, I've Captain Rynders here to back me. We werek response, but we would cut your hair for you. Douglass concluded his triumphant remarks by calling upon ts unpremeditated utterance maintained the level of Douglass's, and ended the meeting with a sense of climax —
John Buren (search for this): chapter 9
desperadoes who acknowledged his captaincy. His campaigning in behalf of Polk and Dallas in 1844 secured him the friendly patronage of the successful candidate for Vice-President, and he took office as Weigher in the Custom-house of the metropolis. He found time, while thus employed, to engineer the Astor Place riot on behalf of the actor Forrest against his English rival Macready, on May Io, 1849, and the year 1850 opened with his trial for this atrocity and his successful defense by John Van Buren. On February 16 he and his Club broke up an anti-Wilmot-Proviso meeting in New York — a seeming inconsistency, but it was charged against Rynders that he had offered to give the State of New York to Clay in the election of 1844 for $30,000, and had met with reluctant refusal. In March he was arrested for a brutal assault on a gentleman in a hotel, but the victim and the witnesses found it prudent not to appear against a ruffian who did not hesitate to threaten the district-attorney in
lready fortified out of that very volume? The effect of the situation on Garrison's temperament may be seen in the meeting at the Tabernacle. There is a demonic element in what he says: his utterance is forced out of him: it is not calculated. You could not reproduce the spirit of this utterance except at the cost of two centuries of human passion. There is a demonic element also in Garrison's courage. He displays, on this occasion, at least two kinds of genius, the genius of satire,---Voltaire might have uttered the scathing slashes about Christ in the presidential chair, --and the all but antipodal genius of infinite sweetness of temperament. The New York Herald in advance of the meeting denounced Garrison for many days in succession, and advised the breaking up of the meeting by violence. According to the Herald, Garrison boldly urges the utter overthrow of the churches, the Sabbath, and the Bible. Nothing has been sacred with him but the ideal intellect of the negro race.
Thomas L. Kane (search for this): chapter 9
h music. But it was of no avail. Rynders drowned their fine voices with noise and shouting. Still, a knockdown argument with a live combatant would have suited him better than mere Bedlamitish disturbance. He was almost gratified by young Thomas L. Kane, son of Judge Kane of Philadelphia, who, seeing the rush of the mob upon the platform, had himself leaped there, to protect his townsman, Dr. Furness. They shall not touch a hair of your head, he said in a tone of great excitement; and, as thJudge Kane of Philadelphia, who, seeing the rush of the mob upon the platform, had himself leaped there, to protect his townsman, Dr. Furness. They shall not touch a hair of your head, he said in a tone of great excitement; and, as the strain became more intense, he rushed up to Rynders and shook his fist in his face. He said to me [Dr. Furness] with the deepest emphasis: If he touches Mr. Garrison I'll kill him. But Mr. Garrison's composure was more than a coat of mail. The knot was cut by Francis Jackson's formal offer of the floor to Rynders as soon as Mr. Garrison had finished his remarks; with an invitation meanwhile to take a seat on the platform. This, says Mr. May, he scoutingly refused; but, seeing the manife
which he opened became a Democratic rendezvous and the headquarters of the Empire Club, an organization of roughs and desperadoes who acknowledged his captaincy. His campaigning in behalf of Polk and Dallas in 1844 secured him the friendly patronage of the successful candidate for Vice-President, and he took office as Weigher in the Custom-house of the metropolis. He found time, while thus employed, to engineer the Astor Place riot on behalf of the actor Forrest against his English rival Macready, on May Io, 1849, and the year 1850 opened with his trial for this atrocity and his successful defense by John Van Buren. On February 16 he and his Club broke up an anti-Wilmot-Proviso meeting in New York — a seeming inconsistency, but it was charged against Rynders that he had offered to give the State of New York to Clay in the election of 1844 for $30,000, and had met with reluctant refusal. In March he was arrested for a brutal assault on a gentleman in a hotel, but the victim and the
Sydney Howard Gay (search for this): chapter 9
anic. The Abolitionist leaders upon the platform remained imperturbable. I was not aware, writes Dr. Furness, of being under any apprehension of personal violence. We were all like General Jackson's cotton-bales at New Orleans. Our demeanor made it impossible for the rioters to use any physical force against us. Rynders found himself in the midst of Francis and Edmund Jackson, of Wendell Phillips, of Edmund Quincy, of Charles F. Hovey, of William H. Furness, of Samuel May, Jr., of Sydney Howard Gay, of Isaac T. Hopper, of Henry C. Wright, of Abby Kelley Foster, of Frederick Douglass, of Mr. Garrison--against whom his menaces were specially directed. Never was a human being more out of his element. The following, according to the Herald, was what greeted Mr. Garrison's ear: Captain Rynders (clenching his fist)--I will not allow you to assail the President of the United States. You shan't do it (shaking his fist at Mr. Garrison). Many voices — Turn him out, turn hi
Unitarian (search for this): chapter 9
he proceedings, it would have been wretchedly out of place. As it was, my speech fitted in almost as well as if it had been impromptu, although a sharp eye might easily have discovered that I was speaking memoriter. Rynders interrupted me again and again, exclaiming that I lied, that I was personal; but he ended with applauding me! No greater contrast to what was to follow could possibly be imagined than the genial manner, firm tones, and self-possession, the refined discourse, of this Unitarian clergyman, who was felt to have turned the current of the meeting. There uprose, as per agreement, one Professor Grant, a seedylooking personage, having one hand tied round with a dirty cotton cloth. Mr. Garrison recognized him as a former pressman in the Liberator office. His thesis was that the blacks were not men, but belonged to the monkey tribe. His speech proved dull and tiresome, and was made sport of by his own set, whom Mr. Garrison had to call to order. There were now loud
is region he became familiar with all forms of violence, including the institution of slavery. After many personal hazards and vicissitudes, he returned to New York city, where he proved to be admirably qualified for local political leadership in connection with Tammany Hall. A sportinghouse which he opened became a Democratic rendezvous and the headquarters of the Empire Club, an organization of roughs and desperadoes who acknowledged his captaincy. His campaigning in behalf of Polk and Dallas in 1844 secured him the friendly patronage of the successful candidate for Vice-President, and he took office as Weigher in the Custom-house of the metropolis. He found time, while thus employed, to engineer the Astor Place riot on behalf of the actor Forrest against his English rival Macready, on May Io, 1849, and the year 1850 opened with his trial for this atrocity and his successful defense by John Van Buren. On February 16 he and his Club broke up an anti-Wilmot-Proviso meeting in New
Samuel May (search for this): chapter 9
t us. Rynders found himself in the midst of Francis and Edmund Jackson, of Wendell Phillips, of Edmund Quincy, of Charles F. Hovey, of William H. Furness, of Samuel May, Jr., of Sydney Howard Gay, of Isaac T. Hopper, of Henry C. Wright, of Abby Kelley Foster, of Frederick Douglass, of Mr. Garrison--against whom his menaces were spas you confined yourself to your subject, I did not interfere; but I will not permit you or any other man to misrepresent the President. Mr. Garrison, as the Rev. Samuel May testifies, calmly replied that he had simply quoted some recent words of General Taylor, and appealed to the audience if he had said aught in disrespect of 's formal offer of the floor to Rynders as soon as Mr. Garrison had finished his remarks; with an invitation meanwhile to take a seat on the platform. This, says Mr. May, he scoutingly refused; but, seeing the manifest fairness of the president's offer, drew back a little, and stood, with folded arms, waiting for Mr. Garrison to
Isaiah Rynders (search for this): chapter 9
rk Herald's account of the meeting: Captain Rynders (who occupied a position in the backgrountes just as well as in Massachusetts. Captain Rynders--Are you aware that the slaves in the Souioters to use any physical force against us. Rynders found himself in the midst of Francis and Edmou ought not to interrupt us, he continued to Rynders — in the quietest manner conceivable, as Dr. savages with music. But it was of no avail. Rynders drowned their fine voices with noise and shoues. After some parleying, it appeared that Rynders had a spokesman who preferred to speak after sing the audience with laughter. After this, Rynders, finding how he was played with, took care to hold his peace; but someone of Rynders' company in the gallery undertook to interrupt the speaker. It's of no use, said Mr. Douglass, I've Captain Rynders here to back me. We were born here, he down on the floor to see some friends there. Rynders came by. I could not help saying to him: How [20 more...]
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