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California (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ushes, 902 combs, 21 needle-books, 1,189 pairs of socks, 213 cans condensed milk, 79 cans coffee, 259 lbs. farina, 166 lbs. corn starch, 130 maizena, 67 1/2 gelatine, 59 tea, 262 castile soap, 264 dried apple, 39 arrowroot, 25 sugar, 66 cans of jellies, and preserves of different kinds; oat meal, rice, 68 gallons old New-England rum, 10 gallons Jamaica rum, 10 bottles Jamaica rum, 64 bottles whiskey, 75 bottles brandy, 10 bottles Madeira wine, 23 bottles sherry, 20 bottles port, 32 bottles California, 4 bottles Isabella, 3 bottles blackberry, 3 bottles blueberry, 9 bottles elderberry, 4 bottles gin, 10 bottles cherry-brandy, 10 bottles tamarinds, 22 bottles cider, 211 bottles cologne, 83 bottles lemon syrup, 62 bottles raspberry, 12 bottles ginger, 10 bottles bay rum, 6 bottles lavender water, 10 bottles pickles, 12 sets knives and forks, 11 waiters, 5 coffee pots, 75 plates and saucers, 15 pitchers, 2 salts, 3 sieves, 8 sugar bowls, 25 tin mugs, 150 spoons, 615 fans, 16 holders, 124 h
Sherborn (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
d of their good works; one of them, Miss Emily Ruggles, furnished a representative recruit for three years service. Sherborn Incorporated May 27, 1674. Population in 1860, 1,129; in 1865, 1,049. Valuation in 1860, $873,154; in 1865, $869,539.ty-five dollars to each of the fourteen men required to fill the quota of the town, who should enlist and be credited to Sherborn. August 5th, The bounty was increased to one hundred and seventy-five dollars to each three-years volunteer. A commitlso one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each citizen who had paid commutation money, or had procured a substitute. Sherborn furnished one hundred and eight men for the war, which was a surplus of sixteen over and above all demands. Three were in 1862, $1,021.24; in 1863, $1,515.70; in 1864, $1,336.94; in 1865, $800.00. Total amount, $4,792.22. The ladies of Sherborn were very active in their labors for the comfort of the soldiers. Shirley Incorporated Jan. 5, 1753. Population i
Burlington (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
e town during the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and which was repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $191.36; in 1862, $1,093.32; in 1863, $1,996.96; in 1864, $4,606.40; in 1865, $3,935.06. Total amount $11.823.10. Burlington Incorporated Feb. 28, 1799. Population in 1860, 606; in 1865, 594. Valuation in 1860, $328,461; in 1865, $408,136. The selectmen in 1861 were Nathan Blanchard, William Winn, John Wood; in 1862, 1863, and 1864, Nathan Blanchard, William er was authorized to borrow such sums of money as may be required to pay bounties. 1865. June 9th, Voted, to reimburse the money raised by subscription during the past year, though not till after being assessed and paid into the treasury. Burlington furnished eighty-two men for the war, which was a surplus of four over and above all demands. None were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town for war purposes, exclusive of State aid, was ten t
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
h volunteer for nine months service who shall enlist and be credited to the town within ten days. Another meeting was held on the 29th of August, in regard to the same matter. September 29th, The selectmen were directed to enlist five more volunteers. It was also— Resolved, That whereas we have learned that Ralph A. Jones, one of our volunteers has fallen in battle, and that others are known to be wounded; therefore— Resolved, That Rev. Calvin H. Topliffe be requested to proceed to Maryland and recover, if possible, the body of said Ralph A. Jones, or of any others who have since died; and further, to attend to the wants of the wounded men suffering in any of the hospitals; that in case of the death of any volunteer forming part of the town's quota, whose family is entitled to State aid, the same shall be continued by the town. November 4th, Rev. Calvin H. Topliffe was appointed to bring home the bodies of any volunteers who have fallen, or may fall in battle, if practica
Essex County (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
Chapter 10: Middlesex County. Freetown, Bristol County, Mass.This county is the most populous in the Commonwealth, and next to Suffolk the most wealthy. It has a grand historic renown: within its limits are Lexington, Concord, and Bunker Hill. It is bounded north by New Hampshire, north-east by the county of Essex, south-east by Charles River, Boston Harbor, and Norfolk County, and west by the county of Worcester. Its rivers are the Merrimac, Charles, Mystic, Sudbury, Concord, and Nashua. Nearly every town is now intersected with a railroad. It contains fifty-four cities and towns. Since the war the town of Hudson, formed of parts of Marlborough and Stow, and the town of Everett, formed of a part of Maiden, have been incorporated as separate and distinct towns; the former, March 19, 1866, and the latter, March 9, 1870. Their war records form a part of that of the towns from which they were set off, and therefore do not appear distinct and separate in this volume. In old
Bedford, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
44.93; in 1863, $3,301.58; in 1864, $3,843.32; in 1865, $2,000.00. Total amount, $11,853.89. Bedford Incorporated Sept. 23, 1729. Population in 1860, 843; in 1865, 820. Valuation in 1860, $47gnation was expressed. A citizens' meeting was immediately held, in which several gentlemen of Bedford made speeches which expressed strongly the patriotic feelings of the people, and twenty-two hun, was adopted. 1862. March 31st, The free use of the town hall was tendered to the ladies of Bedford in which to hold the meetings of the Ladies' Soldiers-Aid Society. August 11th, A bounty of one. Several acts of the Legislature amendatory of the State-aid law were adopted by the town. Bedford furnished ninety-five men for the war, which was a surplus of four over and above all demands. 863, $1,318.45; in 1864, $1,055.37; in 1865, $519.73. Total amount, $3,924.78. The ladies of Bedford did a large amount of good work for the soldiers, knitting socks, making garments, and otherwis
Sudbury, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
est by the county of Worcester. Its rivers are the Merrimac, Charles, Mystic, Sudbury, Concord, and Nashua. Nearly every town is now intersected with a railroad. ould cry out, put it up again. The fair netted over eight hundred dollars. Sudbury Incorporated Sept. 4, 1639. Population in 1860, 1,691; in 1865, 1,703. Vampany B, of the Second Battalion Massachusetts Volunteer Militia,—belonging to Sudbury, would be called into active service, it was voted to furnish a new uniform anvide at the expense of the town for any sick or wounded volunteer belonging to Sudbury. August 19th, The bounty to volunteers for nine months service was fixed at oive dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist and be credited to the quota of Sudbury, in anticipation of any subsequent call of the President for more men. This amount of bounty was continued to be paid until the close of the war. Sudbury furnished one hundred and sixty-eight men for the war, which was a surplus of eleven o
Nashua (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
Chapter 10: Middlesex County. Freetown, Bristol County, Mass.This county is the most populous in the Commonwealth, and next to Suffolk the most wealthy. It has a grand historic renown: within its limits are Lexington, Concord, and Bunker Hill. It is bounded north by New Hampshire, north-east by the county of Essex, south-east by Charles River, Boston Harbor, and Norfolk County, and west by the county of Worcester. Its rivers are the Merrimac, Charles, Mystic, Sudbury, Concord, and Nashua. Nearly every town is now intersected with a railroad. It contains fifty-four cities and towns. Since the war the town of Hudson, formed of parts of Marlborough and Stow, and the town of Everett, formed of a part of Maiden, have been incorporated as separate and distinct towns; the former, March 19, 1866, and the latter, March 9, 1870. Their war records form a part of that of the towns from which they were set off, and therefore do not appear distinct and separate in this volume. In old t
Stowe, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
expended by the town during the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $2,956.91; in 1862, $7,314.82; in 1863, $6,800.00; in 1864, $10,800.00; in 1865, $8,600. Total amount, $36,111.73. Stow Incorporated May 16, 1683. Population in 1860, 1,641; in 1865, 1,537. Valuation in 1860, $713,320; in 1865, $764,274. The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were H. W. Nelson, F. W. Warren, A. Rice; in 1863, William H. Brown, Truman Walcott, Jonat61 was Thomas H. Bent; in 1862 and 1863, William H. Brown; in 1864, R. W. Derby; in 1865, Peter Fletcher. 1861. A legal town-meeting was held April 27th, at which it was voted to appropriate one thousand dollars to uniform and equip citizens of Stow who volunteer in the military service, and to support their families while absent on duty. Twenty-eight young men immediately volunteered. Cloth was purchased, and the ladies from day to day met at the town hall and made nearly one hundred garme
Medford (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
$3,179.37; in 1862, $9,147.30; in 1863, $9,941.78; in 1864, $14,400.00; in 1865, $8,700.00. Total amount, $45,368.45. Medford Incorporated Sept. 28, 1630. Population in 1860, 4,842; in 1865, 4,860. Valuation in 1860, $4,978.071; in 1865, $5,nds and fellow citizens to do their duty as patriots and soldiers; therefore be it— Resolved, By us, the citizens of Medford, that we will, to our utmost ability, assist in the preparation and outfit of those who have generously volunteered theinteer Militia, which left for Washington on the 21st of April, under command of Colonel Samuel C. Lawrence (who lived in Medford), for three months service. This regiment was in the first battle of Bull Run, and behaved bravely, when the Colonel wain their judgment is necessary for the support of families of volunteers, without regard to what the State may allow. Medford furnished five hundred and fifty-seven men for the war, which was a surplus of sixty-one men over and above all demands.
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