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s where the small breaks had occurred, several attempts were made by Hood to reanimate his men and push on, but all in vain. This was called in line from left to right, viz., Palmer's, Howard's, and Hooker's. Hood had simply passed partially beyond Hardee's left and come up to makeoissance and attack, so that Hooker's men encountered only a part of Hood's and a part of Hardee's commands. Schofield breasted the remainder of Hood's divisions and the cavalry of Wheeler, which supported Hood's moving left flank. In view of these plain facts Sherman was incenseHood's moving left flank. In view of these plain facts Sherman was incensed that Hooker should have made such a fulsome report, and some words of Thomas increased his vexation-words that we find in a letter written bonfirmed by the surprisingly long defensive line which he occupied. Hood, at first, had the right, covering all the wagon approaches and traiat Resaca. The Army of the Tennessee, with Blair on the left, faced Hood. A short distance beyond, eastward, was Garrard's cavalry, trying t
Montgomery Blair (search for this): chapter 2.33
gan there, crossed the next highway (the Marietta and Lost Mountain road), and gradually drew back till his left was somewhere between Kolb's Farm and Zion's Church, that part of his force looking into the valley of Olley's Creek. On our side, Blair, with his Seventeenth Corps, had now come to us from the west. He brought enough men to compensate for Sherman's previous losses; so that, like Johnston, Sherman had about the same numbers as at Resaca. The Army of the Tennessee, with Blair on Blair on the left, faced Hood. A short distance beyond, eastward, was Garrard's cavalry, trying to keep back the Confederate cavalry of Wheeler. Thomas, with his three Union corps, touched the middle bend opposite Loring and part of Hardee. Hooker's corps made Thomas's right; then came, on the extreme right, the Twenty-third Corps and Stoneman's cavalry, under Schofield. The Union right, already by June 20th reached as far south as Olley's Creek. The whole infantry stretch of Sherman's front was
uarters camp half a mile farther to our right, about the same distance from Marietta. Van Duzer thus, by the wires keeping up his connection with Washington, united our commands. He used for us what was called the field line of telegraph wire, and connected his railroad line with Sherman, and Sherman with Thomas half a mile distant, and with Schofield, at least two miles in the same direction; also northward from Sherman two miles with McPherson. Here, then, like the arrangements of Von Moltke in the Franco-Prussian War, we have our commander in a central position on high ground, about one mile in our rear, connecting his spreading rays in fanshaped order with his army commanders; and they by signal stations and swift messengers with their corps commanders, the latter with division leaders, and so on to include brigades and regiments. Johnston did well to go up to the Kenesaw crest. Here he had in the battle similar but better advantages over Sherman than Meade had over Lee
Oliver Otis Howard (search for this): chapter 2.33
(upon his horse) he led in that terrible assault on the enemy's breastworks. We did not carry them, but part of his command reached the works. A sergeant bearing the colors was bayoneted as he was climbing over. Our beloved and trusted young general was close by, pressing forward his column, when the fatal wound was received. I never saw him after the fight began. I do not yet realize that he is goneone so full of rich promise, so noble, so true a friend, so patriotic a soldier. God grant that we may live like him, and, if called to die, have as good an earnest of enduring peace in heaven as had our lamented General C. G. Harker. I am, colonel, respectfully, your obedient servant, O. O. Howard, Major General. Colonel G. P. Buell, commanding fifth-eighth Indiana. General Daniel McCook, who fell about the same moment as Harker, was once Sherman's law partner, and brother of Major General A. McD. McCook, of the army. Sherman felt his loss as he would that of a brother.
Joseph Hooker (search for this): chapter 2.33
avy skirmish firing along the whole front. As Hooker went forward he first drove in the enemy's cav of Colonel Grose's brigade. In this manner Hooker was given the whole of Butterfield's division ut 9.20 P. M. He then wrote to Thomas, who was Hooker's army commander. After citing to Thomas two g I had no idea of his being attacked; and General Hooker must be mistaken about three entire corps ad been all the time in place, and close up to Hooker's right flank. When Sherman had passed fromto make his reconnoissance and attack, so that Hooker's men encountered only a part of Hood's and a my return to my headquarters this morning that Hooker reported he had the whole rebel army in his frhe ground to show where his lines had been. Hooker, thus called to account, made answer, apologetan, considering that the original statement of Hooker had reflected to his hurt upon an army commandhoped against hope that Schofield, followed by Hooker, might make a lodgment upon Johnston's weaken[29 more...]
time in place, and close up to Hooker's right flank. When Sherman had passed from his left to his right, he had found evidence to satisfy him that Confederate Loring held all the long breastworks of the Confederate right opposite McPherson; Hardee held the center and much of the left opposite Thomas's three corps, which were e right, covering all the wagon approaches and trails from Ackworth and the north, and the wagon and railroads that ran between Brush Mountain and the Kenesaw. Loring, the Confederate commander who now replaced Polk, for his custody and defense had all the Kenesaw front, including the southern sloping crest and the ground pass, eastward, was Garrard's cavalry, trying to keep back the Confederate cavalry of Wheeler. Thomas, with his three Union corps, touched the middle bend opposite Loring and part of Hardee. Hooker's corps made Thomas's right; then came, on the extreme right, the Twenty-third Corps and Stoneman's cavalry, under Schofield. The Uni
Frank T. Sherman (search for this): chapter 2.33
ould be made. On that date, as he often did, Sherman rode from end to end of our line, in order thing left flank. In view of these plain facts Sherman was incensed that Hooker should have made sucthat we find in a letter written by Thomas to Sherman himself, about ten o'clock the same night, fo Hooker to an account for his exaggerations. Sherman's determination to do so was increased when h. The handsome village of Marietta, known to Sherman in his youth, lying eastward between the mounest. He brought enough men to compensate for Sherman's previous losses; so that, like Johnston, Sh Secretary of War at 9.30 P. M. on June 24th: Sherman moved to a point in field three miles west ofconnected his railroad line with Sherman, and Sherman with Thomas half a mile distant, and with Schre Confederate loss was 522 against 2,500 for Sherman. It is a wonder our loss was not greater. ell about the same moment as Harker, was once Sherman's law partner, and brother of Major General A[28 more...]
of the One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Illinois succeeded him in command, but fell immediately after. He was a brave and skillful officer. The death of these two noble leaders was at the time a great misfortune to the troops, and will ever be to the army and country a great loss. General Davis's losses were 770. Sherman still hoped against hope that Schofield, followed by Hooker, might make a lodgment upon Johnston's weakened flank. Schofield's dispatch at 10 A. M. was encouraging: Colonel Reilly has carried a position on the Sandtown road and driven the enemy back. Cox will push forward as much as possible. Hascall is using his artillery freely and pressing strongly, but finds the enemy too strong to give hope of getting his works. But at last Cox's dispatch, received at 4.30 P. M., showed that nothing more could be done. Cox and Stoneman, routing a Confederate detachment and driving it back, seizing and holding an important Confederate outwork, had done good service for f
in road), and gradually drew back till his left was somewhere between Kolb's Farm and Zion's Church, that part of his force looking into the valley of Olley's Creek. On our side, Blair, with his Seventeenth Corps, had now come to us from the west. He brought enough men to compensate for Sherman's previous losses; so that, like Johnston, Sherman had about the same numbers as at Resaca. The Army of the Tennessee, with Blair on the left, faced Hood. A short distance beyond, eastward, was Garrard's cavalry, trying to keep back the Confederate cavalry of Wheeler. Thomas, with his three Union corps, touched the middle bend opposite Loring and part of Hardee. Hooker's corps made Thomas's right; then came, on the extreme right, the Twenty-third Corps and Stoneman's cavalry, under Schofield. The Union right, already by June 20th reached as far south as Olley's Creek. The whole infantry stretch of Sherman's front was at that time fully eight miles. There are four distinct combats
h (upon his horse) he led in that terrible assault on the enemy's breastworks. We did not carry them, but part of his command reached the works. A sergeant bearing the colors was bayoneted as he was climbing over. Our beloved and trusted young general was close by, pressing forward his column, when the fatal wound was received. I never saw him after the fight began. I do not yet realize that he is goneone so full of rich promise, so noble, so true a friend, so patriotic a soldier. God grant that we may live like him, and, if called to die, have as good an earnest of enduring peace in heaven as had our lamented General C. G. Harker. I am, colonel, respectfully, your obedient servant, O. O. Howard, Major General. Colonel G. P. Buell, commanding fifth-eighth Indiana. General Daniel McCook, who fell about the same moment as Harker, was once Sherman's law partner, and brother of Major General A. McD. McCook, of the army. Sherman felt his loss as he would that of a brother.
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