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Daniel McCook (search for this): chapter 2.33
vis chose what seemed to be the most vulnerable point in the enemy's breastworks. He designated McCook's and Mitchell's brigades, placing McCook on his right and Mitchell on his left, in the rear of McCook on his right and Mitchell on his left, in the rear of my right division (Stanley's). Morgan's brigade he held in reserve. His front line was about 600 yards from the point of attack. There the ground was uneven and rocky, covered with the usual trees on be held and the troops intrenched where they were. This he ordered to be done. . . . Colonel Daniel McCook, long the admired and gallant commander of his brigade, fell with a severe wound, of whi O. O. Howard, Major General. Colonel G. P. Buell, commanding fifth-eighth Indiana. General Daniel McCook, who fell about the same moment as Harker, was once Sherman's law partner, and brother oniel McCook, who fell about the same moment as Harker, was once Sherman's law partner, and brother of Major General A. McD. McCook, of the army. Sherman felt his loss as he would that of a brother.
to relieve his left division (Butterfield's), so that it might be sent off for a reinforcement to his right. This request I complied with at once, using every regiment of mine not then in line. These replacing troops were five regiments of Colonel Grose's brigade. In this manner Hooker was given the whole of Butterfield's division for a reserve, or for resting any troops that had been long engaged; so his left flank was thoroughly secured. Just as soon as the Union troops all along theructions from headquarters, Army of the Cumberland, an attack will be made upon the enemy tomorrow at 8 A. M. by this corps (the Fourth) in conjunction with the Fourteenth Corps. The points of attack are selected near the present position of Colonel Grose's brigade. II. General Newton will lead the assault, being prepared to cover his own left. III. Major General Stanley will retain one of his brigades in position extending from General Palmer's left to the ravine, and will be prepared,
George G. Meade (search for this): chapter 2.33
gements of Von Moltke in the Franco-Prussian War, we have our commander in a central position on high ground, about one mile in our rear, connecting his spreading rays in fanshaped order with his army commanders; and they by signal stations and swift messengers with their corps commanders, the latter with division leaders, and so on to include brigades and regiments. Johnston did well to go up to the Kenesaw crest. Here he had in the battle similar but better advantages over Sherman than Meade had over Lee from the famous Cemetery Hill. Sherman's plan was, as ordered, for Thomas to make a heavy assault at the center with his army while McPherson made a feint on the left and Schofield a threatened attack on the right. Orders: I. The corps of Major General Howard will assault the enemy's intrenchments at some point near the left of Stanley's and Davis's divisions, which will be selected by General Howard after a careful reconnoissance. He will support his attack by such disp
George H. Thomas (search for this): chapter 2.33
rstand the position of his army. He ordered Thomas to advance his right corps, which was Hooker's was Hooker's army commander. After citing to Thomas two dispatches, he telegraphed as follows: held the center and much of the left opposite Thomas's three corps, which were in line from left ttion-words that we find in a letter written by Thomas to Sherman himself, about ten o'clock the sameep back the Confederate cavalry of Wheeler. Thomas, with his three Union corps, touched the middloring and part of Hardee. Hooker's corps made Thomas's right; then came, on the extreme right, the nt in field three miles west of Marietta, and Thomas to a new headquarters camp half a mile farthers railroad line with Sherman, and Sherman with Thomas half a mile distant, and with Schofield, at ley Hill. Sherman's plan was, as ordered, for Thomas to make a heavy assault at the center with hisnd and the enemy's works, I reported to Major General Thomas, and recommended that the position be h[6 more...]
J. C. Duzer (search for this): chapter 2.33
al Sherman's field orders notified us that he and his staff would be near Kenesaw Mountain on June 27th. I recall, in general, the character of the country near to Kenesaw, mostly wild, hilly, and rugged, and thickly covered with virgin trees, oak and chestnut, with here and there a clearing made for a small farm, or a bald opening that seemed to have come of itself, though I but dimly remember Sherman's temporary headquarters, which were fixed on Signal Hill for a few days only. Mr. J. C. Van Duzer (a superintendent of telegraph lines) telegraphed to the Assistant Secretary of War at 9.30 P. M. on June 24th: Sherman moved to a point in field three miles west of Marietta, and Thomas to a new headquarters camp half a mile farther to our right, about the same distance from Marietta. Van Duzer thus, by the wires keeping up his connection with Washington, united our commands. He used for us what was called the field line of telegraph wire, and connected his railroad line with Sh
C. G. Harker (search for this): chapter 2.33
d in the night fight in Lookout Valley, and as Harker's men did at Muddy Creek, deployed lines werecame so galling that the advance was stopped. Harker made a second advance, when he received the woavy, particularly in valuable officers. General Harker's brigade, says Newton, advanced through td and Twenty-fifth Ohio, led Harker's charge. Harker went into the action mounted, and so was a con trial lasted a little more than an hour, when Harker's brigade gave up the assault and fell back fo. Among our greatest losses was that of General Harker, who was in characteristics much like McPhJuly 15, 1864. My Dear Colonel: I knew General Harker as a cadet while I was on duty as instructe department. On taking command of this corps Harker was still a colonel, and as I was a comparativ. The only complaint I ever heard was that if Harker got started against the enemy he could not be niel McCook, who fell about the same moment as Harker, was once Sherman's law partner, and brother o[4 more...]
to secure a lodgment. As soon as it became evident that the enemy's intrenchments could not be carried by assault, the command was directed to resume its former position. Our losses were very heavy, particularly in valuable officers. General Harker's brigade, says Newton, advanced through the dense undergrowth, through the slashing and abatis made by the enemy, in the face of their fire, to the foot of the works, but (the men); were unable to got in, and fell back a short distance. General Wagner's brigade passed through similar obstacles, and (his men) were compelled to stop their advance a short distance from the enemy's works. .. . Apart from the strength of the enemy's lines, and the numerous obstacles which they had accumulated in front of their works, our want of success is in a great degree to be attributed to the thickets and undergrowth, which effectually broke up the formation of our columns and deprived that formation of the momentum which was expected of it. Besides t
J. C. Van Duzer (search for this): chapter 2.33
small farm, or a bald opening that seemed to have come of itself, though I but dimly remember Sherman's temporary headquarters, which were fixed on Signal Hill for a few days only. Mr. J. C. Van Duzer (a superintendent of telegraph lines) telegraphed to the Assistant Secretary of War at 9.30 P. M. on June 24th: Sherman moved to a point in field three miles west of Marietta, and Thomas to a new headquarters camp half a mile farther to our right, about the same distance from Marietta. Van Duzer thus, by the wires keeping up his connection with Washington, united our commands. He used for us what was called the field line of telegraph wire, and connected his railroad line with Sherman, and Sherman with Thomas half a mile distant, and with Schofield, at least two miles in the same direction; also northward from Sherman two miles with McPherson. Here, then, like the arrangements of Von Moltke in the Franco-Prussian War, we have our commander in a central position on high ground,
A. S. Williams (search for this): chapter 2.33
ns of his line-something that might have led to disaster-and that the dispatch came near causing him to do the same as Thomas, administered in his own blunt manner a caustic reprimand. Sherman, as I think, was unaware of his own severity. He justified himself in this phrase: I reproved him more gently than the occasion warranted. The result of this reproof was that from that date to July 27th following, Hooker felt aggrieved. On that day he was relieved, at his own request, by General A. S. Williams. This battle of Kolb's Farm was wholly on the Kenesaw line extended southward. Sherman, on account of guerrilla and cavalry attacks far in his rear, upon his own line of railroad, was greatly distressed concerning his communications. They were not secure enough, he declared, to permit him to break away from his base of supplies. The Kenesaw Mountain-sometimes called the Kenesaws, probably on account of an apparent cross break in the range giving apparently two mountains --is
Robert E. Lee (search for this): chapter 2.33
Moltke in the Franco-Prussian War, we have our commander in a central position on high ground, about one mile in our rear, connecting his spreading rays in fanshaped order with his army commanders; and they by signal stations and swift messengers with their corps commanders, the latter with division leaders, and so on to include brigades and regiments. Johnston did well to go up to the Kenesaw crest. Here he had in the battle similar but better advantages over Sherman than Meade had over Lee from the famous Cemetery Hill. Sherman's plan was, as ordered, for Thomas to make a heavy assault at the center with his army while McPherson made a feint on the left and Schofield a threatened attack on the right. Orders: I. The corps of Major General Howard will assault the enemy's intrenchments at some point near the left of Stanley's and Davis's divisions, which will be selected by General Howard after a careful reconnoissance. He will support his attack by such disposition of his
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