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Stonewall Jackson (search for this): chapter 2.33
ng and part of Hardee. Hooker's corps made Thomas's right; then came, on the extreme right, the Twenty-third Corps and Stoneman's cavalry, under Schofield. The Union right, already by June 20th reached as far south as Olley's Creek. The whole infantry stretch of Sherman's front was at that time fully eight miles. There are four distinct combats which ought to come into this battle of Kenesaw: 1. The combat with Wheeler's cavalry near Brush Mountain. 2. The cavalry combat against Jackson. 3. The battle of Kolb's Farm on June 22d. 4. Our determined attacks and repulses at different points all along the Kenesaw line during June 27th. General Sherman's field orders notified us that he and his staff would be near Kenesaw Mountain on June 27th. I recall, in general, the character of the country near to Kenesaw, mostly wild, hilly, and rugged, and thickly covered with virgin trees, oak and chestnut, with here and there a clearing made for a small farm, or a bald openin
which will be selected by General Howard after a careful reconnoissance. He will support his attack by such disposition of his artillery as, in his judgment, is best calculated to insure success. II. Major General Palmer will, with his column on the right of General Howard's, cooperate with the latter by carrying the enemy's works immediately in his front. The batteries of General Baird's and Davis's divisions will remain as at present posted until the contemplated movement is made. General King's division will occupy its present position, but hold itself in readiness to follow up any advantage gained by the other troops. III. Major General Hooker will support General Palmer on the latter's right with as much of his force as he can draw from his lines, selecting positions for his artillery best calculated to enfilade the enemy's works to his left and on General Palmer's front. In supporting General Palmer's movement, General Hooker will watch carefully his own right flank, an
mn and confusing the regiments in rear. Still many men kept on, pulled the abatis apart1 sprang over or kept under the felled trees, and tried to mount the high parapet. Some were killed, some were seized and pulled over to become prisoners. This terrible trial lasted a little more than an hour, when Harker's brigade gave up the assault and fell back for better shelter, bringing their dead chief, General Harker, with them. Wagner's assault was equally brave-six regiments in column, Colonel Blake, with the Fortieth Indiana in the lead. The Confederates, at one time eagerly pursuing, sprang over their works and undertook to charge Wagner's repulsed brigade, but gained nothing. Palmer, commanding the Fourteenth Corps, selected Jeff. C. Davis's division. Davis chose what seemed to be the most vulnerable point in the enemy's breastworks. He designated McCook's and Mitchell's brigades, placing McCook on his right and Mitchell on his left, in the rear of my right division (Stan
s the case? There cannot be three corps in your front; Johnston has but three corps, and I know from full inspection that a full proportion is now, and has been all day, on his right and center. Sherman also sent for his adjutant general, Captain Dayton, and made inquiry as to whether or not those most important orders had been sent to Schofield and received by him. Dayton immediately brought him the envelope which had on it the receipt of Sherman's instructions, signed by Schofield himself.Dayton immediately brought him the envelope which had on it the receipt of Sherman's instructions, signed by Schofield himself. After that assurance, Sherman was more confident than ever that the Army of the Ohio had been all the time in place, and close up to Hooker's right flank. When Sherman had passed from his left to his right, he had found evidence to satisfy him that Confederate Loring held all the long breastworks of the Confederate right opposite McPherson; Hardee held the center and much of the left opposite Thomas's three corps, which were in line from left to right, viz., Palmer's, Howard's, and Hooke
first answered thus: Dispatch received. Schofield was ordered this morning to be on the Powderthose most important orders had been sent to Schofield and received by him. Dayton immediately broureceipt of Sherman's instructions, signed by Schofield himself. After that assurance, Sherman waf Hood's and a part of Hardee's commands. Schofield breasted the remainder of Hood's divisions ath its results in his mind, Sherman met both Schofield and Hooker near there on the field of battleoker's dispatch to Schofield. Sherman said: Schofield was very angry, and pretty sharp words passed between them, i.e., Schofield and Hooker. Schofield insisted that he had not only formed a stronan with Thomas half a mile distant, and with Schofield, at least two miles in the same direction; awhile McPherson made a feint on the left and Schofield a threatened attack on the right. Orders: a lodgment upon Johnston's weakened flank. Schofield's dispatch at 10 A. M. was encouraging: Colo[9 more...]
om the strength of the enemy's lines, and the numerous obstacles which they had accumulated in front of their works, our want of success is in a great degree to be attributed to the thickets and undergrowth, which effectually broke up the formation of our columns and deprived that formation of the momentum which was expected of it. Besides the enemy's musketry, our troops were exposed to a heavy fire of case shot.... The loss of the division in the assault was 654 killed and wounded. Colonel Opdycke, with the One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Ohio, led Harker's charge. Harker went into the action mounted, and so was a conspicuous mark. At the bugle call the column was started. The mass paid no attention to the enemy's scattered outwatchers, but rushed at once for the hostile skirmish line, protected by deep detached rifle pits. The skirmish fire made but little impression. But here came the tug of battle --musketry before them, hot in their faces, direct and cross firingl On they w
G. P. Buell (search for this): chapter 2.33
(upon his horse) he led in that terrible assault on the enemy's breastworks. We did not carry them, but part of his command reached the works. A sergeant bearing the colors was bayoneted as he was climbing over. Our beloved and trusted young general was close by, pressing forward his column, when the fatal wound was received. I never saw him after the fight began. I do not yet realize that he is goneone so full of rich promise, so noble, so true a friend, so patriotic a soldier. God grant that we may live like him, and, if called to die, have as good an earnest of enduring peace in heaven as had our lamented General C. G. Harker. I am, colonel, respectfully, your obedient servant, O. O. Howard, Major General. Colonel G. P. Buell, commanding fifth-eighth Indiana. General Daniel McCook, who fell about the same moment as Harker, was once Sherman's law partner, and brother of Major General A. McD. McCook, of the army. Sherman felt his loss as he would that of a brother.
Joe Johnston (search for this): chapter 2.33
about three entire corps being in his front. Johnston's army has only three corps, and I know there? There cannot be three corps in your front; Johnston has but three corps, and I know from full inss, mostly covered with trees. From its crest Johnston and his officers could see our movements, whiuntain and the river, could be plainly seen. Johnston could not have found a stronger defensive pos my eye, Kenesaw there, at the middle bend of Johnston's long line, was more difficult than any porthave been six miles. The reports show that Johnston had just before the battle of Kenesaw receiveow easily discovered, but standing so much as Johnston did on the defensive behind the prepared work for Sherman's previous losses; so that, like Johnston, Sherman had about the same numbers as at Resd so on to include brigades and regiments. Johnston did well to go up to the Kenesaw crest. Herellowed by Hooker, might make a lodgment upon Johnston's weakened flank. Schofield's dispatch at 10[1 more...]
Charles Henry Howard (search for this): chapter 2.33
ly suffering intensely. He looked me in the face, and in a low voice said: General Howard, I shall die from this wound 1 Oh, no, McDonald, you will not die A wouny was massing against them. I know there was some force in front of Palmer and Howard, for I was there. Still, it is very natural the enemy should meet Hooker at te Thomas's three corps, which were in line from left to right, viz., Palmer's, Howard's, and Hooker's. Hood had simply passed partially beyond Hardee's left and comeppose us with as much of his force as he could spare, I ordered one division of Howard's to be relieved by Palmer and placed in reserve behind Hooker. Hooker's posrong one, and before I left him he certainly had his troops as well together as Howard has had for the last three days, and Howard has repulsed every attack the enemyHoward has repulsed every attack the enemy has made on him in very handsome style .... The enemy cannot possibly send an overwhelming force against Hooker without exposing his weakness to McPherson. Taking
l Howard will assault the enemy's intrenchments at some point near the left of Stanley's and Davis's divisions, which will be selected by General Howard after a careful reconnoissance. He will support his attack by such disposition of his artillery as, in his judgment, is best calculated to insure success. II. Major General Palmer will, with his column on the right of General Howard's, cooperate with the latter by carrying the enemy's works immediately in his front. The batteries of General Baird's and Davis's divisions will remain as at present posted until the contemplated movement is made. General King's division will occupy its present position, but hold itself in readiness to follow up any advantage gained by the other troops. III. Major General Hooker will support General Palmer on the latter's right with as much of his force as he can draw from his lines, selecting positions for his artillery best calculated to enfilade the enemy's works to his left and on General Palm
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