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Edwin M. Stanton (search for this): chapter 11
erfect organization and correct strategy. So far as can be ascertained, they had no differences as to the wisdom of removing Simon Cameron, or of appointing Edwin M. Stanton (January 13, 1862) as Secretary of War. They concurred in predicting that his successor would organize victory. Finally, if they did not join in recommendimined, was now certain. The battle of Bull Run, the retirement of the superannuated lieutenant-general, the resignation of Simon Cameron, the appointment of Edwin M. Stanton as Secretary of War, and the assignment of General McClellan to the command of the army had all followed rapidly. Dana's acquaintance with the leading men irying it on, had secured for Dana the approval and friendship of a far more powerful and important friend in the cabinet than even Seward. I refer, of course, to Stanton, the new Secretary of War, and in order to remove all doubt as to the personal and official relations between them, I shall in the next chapter quote freely from
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 11
erary activities political campaign of 1860 Lincoln's Cooper Union speech Lincoln elected presidLincoln elected president signs of secession Bombardment of Fort Sumter the Union cannot be dissolved forward to RBates. No one in the East had yet thought of Lincoln. His first serious mention in the Tribune oc audience. It is a matter of history that Lincoln was nominated for the presidency on May 19, 1, was written by Dana. It was followed after Lincoln's election by another, which was evidently Grpower. After Fort Sumter was fired on, and Lincoln's call for troops had been sent out, the cry e of Antietam (September 17, 1862), when President Lincoln, in recognition of a growing demand fromknown that it was not favorably considered by Lincoln till he became convinced that he could properay in reply to your wish that I may go into Mr. Lincoln's cabinet, except to thank you for the impld Republicans in Congress, and afterwards, as Lincoln's most conspicuous rival for the presidency,
esident signs of secession Bombardment of Fort Sumter the Union cannot be dissolved forward to Richmond tribune's change of policy Emancipation Proclamation Dana dismissed from the tribune But neither the hatred of slavery nor the love of freedom, engrossing as they were, could absorb or afford occupation for all Dana's energy and activity. It must have been early in 1848-as he was in Europe during the last half of that year — that he translated and published a small volume of German Stories and Legends for children, under the title of The Black Ant. Rudolph Garrigue, Astor House, New York, 1848-Tauchnitz, same. It included in its contents The Inkstand, The curious Cockerel, The Christ-child, The Princess Unca, Nut Cracker and sugar Dolly, and twelve others. The last of these was the longest. The little volume received wide circulation, and became most popular with American children, but was noticeable rather from the fact that it was one of the earliest, if not the
nd still justly holds its place as the best volume of the kind published in the English language. It is to be observed, however, that the compiler's modesty was too great to permit him to include even one of his own poems within its ample limits. The success which crowned this work from the start soon led to another and far more ambitious undertaking. Dana's indefatigable industry and wide range of reading had stored his mind with an extraordinary variety and amount of learning. Like Diderot, who compiled the first encyclopaedia worthy of the name, he was undoubtedly at that time among the very few men of his country qualified for a work of that character, and this his publishers were not slow to recognize. The time seemed to be favorable, and accordingly his proposal that he and his old associate, George Ripley, should undertake the preparation of The American Cyclopaedia was accepted. It was a work of considerable magnitude, requiring not only much capital, but the co-opera
Oliver Johnson (search for this): chapter 11
f Forward to Richmond, which Greeley formally repudiated immediately after the battle of Bull Run, the real reason was that Dana was too aggressive, too positive, too self-confident, and too active to travel longer in harmony with Greeley. Their divergent natures, not less than their divergent opinions about the war, had brought them to the parting of the ways. It was doubtless better for both that they should separate, and this view of it was set forth later in a personal letter which Oliver Johnson, one of the board of managers, wrote to Dana on May 27, 1865. In this letter he says: Well, I have been reminded of this little story a hundred times in the last three years, in reflecting upon the part I took in terminating your connection with the Tribune. If I had felt then as I did not long afterwards, I should not have done it. In other words, if I had known then what I know now as to Mr. Greeley's state of mind in relation to the war, I would sooner have let him go off, as h
. [Fordyce] Barker is getting up in his practice, and must be a rich man very soon. When I see him trooping about with his two roan horses, I get vexed at you because you aren't a doctor, too. That was apparently what nature laid you out for, but you've been and stopped her. The next year, after wondering how he ever found time to write at all, he wrote a long letter about the Cyclopaedia, the book of poetry, and also about their common friends, Bayard Taylor, George William Curtis, Count Gurowski, Pike, and Parke Godwin, winding up with thanks for the little moral lecture Huntington, his correspondent, had given him on the Cyclopaedia, which he suggested was not needed, because he probably knew its faults and the difficulties attending its composition and publication better than any one else. With the first shot directed against the flag at Fort Sumter, Dana came out for war to the death. The Tribune also buckled on its armor and warned traitors of their doom. The administra
S. P. Chase (search for this): chapter 11
rt the candidate of the party, whoever he might be, they were willing that it should be Seward only in case it became reasonably certain that any Republican would be beaten. And yet its three candidates, in the order of preference, were Seward, Chase, and Bates. No one in the East had yet thought of Lincoln. His first serious mention in the Tribune occurred in the announcement of his forthcoming speech at Cooper Union. This indorsed him: As emphatically a man of the people, a champios of the country was both intimate and extensive. He corresponded upon occasions with many of them, especially when he wished to assure himself in regard to matters of party policy and management. Among the most important men of the day was Senator Chase, of Ohio, who had been a Free-soiler from the start, and was regarded by many as the best man in the country for president. As one of the defeated candidates for the nomination, his name was necessarily in the list of eligibles for an import
Emancipation Proclamation (search for this): chapter 11
terary activities political campaign of 1860 Lincoln's Cooper Union speech Lincoln elected president signs of secession Bombardment of Fort Sumter the Union cannot be dissolved forward to Richmond tribune's change of policy Emancipation Proclamation Dana dismissed from the tribune But neither the hatred of slavery nor the love of freedom, engrossing as they were, could absorb or afford occupation for all Dana's energy and activity. It must have been early in 1848-as he was in States. And this idea was reiterated at intervals till shortly after the battle of Antietam (September 17, 1862), when President Lincoln, in recognition of a growing demand from the people, issued, September 22d, his ever-memorable Emancipation Proclamation, which took effect January 1, 1863, and finally put an end forever to slavery in the United States. Who first formulated this demand it would be impossible to ascertain at this late day, though it is known that it was not favorably con
Bayard Taylor (search for this): chapter 11
ow the omitted poets growl over it!. .. [Fordyce] Barker is getting up in his practice, and must be a rich man very soon. When I see him trooping about with his two roan horses, I get vexed at you because you aren't a doctor, too. That was apparently what nature laid you out for, but you've been and stopped her. The next year, after wondering how he ever found time to write at all, he wrote a long letter about the Cyclopaedia, the book of poetry, and also about their common friends, Bayard Taylor, George William Curtis, Count Gurowski, Pike, and Parke Godwin, winding up with thanks for the little moral lecture Huntington, his correspondent, had given him on the Cyclopaedia, which he suggested was not needed, because he probably knew its faults and the difficulties attending its composition and publication better than any one else. With the first shot directed against the flag at Fort Sumter, Dana came out for war to the death. The Tribune also buckled on its armor and warned
Simon Cameron (search for this): chapter 11
t--that it was a question of leaders, rather than of theories — of relative readiness and resources, rather than of perfect organization and correct strategy. So far as can be ascertained, they had no differences as to the wisdom of removing Simon Cameron, or of appointing Edwin M. Stanton (January 13, 1862) as Secretary of War. They concurred in predicting that his successor would organize victory. Finally, if they did not join in recommending the removal of McClellan from the command of alstom-houses, and other property in the seceding States. The loyal people had sprung to arms, and war, bloody and determined, was now certain. The battle of Bull Run, the retirement of the superannuated lieutenant-general, the resignation of Simon Cameron, the appointment of Edwin M. Stanton as Secretary of War, and the assignment of General McClellan to the command of the army had all followed rapidly. Dana's acquaintance with the leading men in all sections of the country was both intimate
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