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Charles A. Dana (search for this): chapter 11
raph letter from Seward, marked Private, and addressed to Charles A. Dana, Esq., editor of the Tribune. It runs as follows: Washington, January 27, 1859. My dear Dana, I am glad that you have explained the discordance in the reports of the debate in the Spanish Cortes. I will add a note of it to my speech in the pamphlet pubpicuous rival for the presidency, was selected to fill the high office of Secretary of State, it may be fairly assumed that he had not changed his attitude towards Dana, even though the latter was no longer connected with the Tribune. But this is not all. The hearty support which that journal had from the first given to a vigorcially the aggressive views which the managing editor was now generally known to entertain in reference to the methods and plans of carrying it on, had secured for Dana the approval and friendship of a far more powerful and important friend in the cabinet than even Seward. I refer, of course, to Stanton, the new Secretary of War,
Fordyce Barker (search for this): chapter 11
rentiated with distinctness from those of Greeley and the other New York editors. He was generally recognized as a more virile and vigorous writer than his chief, and a more consistent and patriotic one than most of his rivals. On September 30th of the same year, after a page of personal gossip, he wrote to his friend: I have sent you a copy of The Household Book of Poetry, . . . which also promises a fair pecuniary success. Lord, how the omitted poets growl over it!. .. [Fordyce] Barker is getting up in his practice, and must be a rich man very soon. When I see him trooping about with his two roan horses, I get vexed at you because you aren't a doctor, too. That was apparently what nature laid you out for, but you've been and stopped her. The next year, after wondering how he ever found time to write at all, he wrote a long letter about the Cyclopaedia, the book of poetry, and also about their common friends, Bayard Taylor, George William Curtis, Count Gurowski, Pike,
wife and babies; but keep on having as jolly a time as ever, even without the luxuries of other days. But we have got a good cook, and if you were only back in the second story front, there would indeed be reason to believe in a superintending Providence. It's stupid in you, too, to be there in Paris, when we could keep you so nicely at work on the Cyclopaedia, filling up the gaps as we advance with printing. But never mind — there will be a good time for us all somewhere. My love to Mrs. Cranch, and to you, my dear Huntington, the same steady old affection which never showed a sign of giving out. On April 6, 1858, in explanation of his delay in writing, he says: The fact is I am a pretty busy chap. We print about seventy-five pages a week of the Cyclopaedia, which I must prepare the copy for, and then do my part in the revision of the proofs. Then all the afternoon and evening serving the Tribune. However, we keep good spirits and good digestion, and for constitutio
William Henry Huntington (search for this): chapter 11
his most valued correspondents for a period of ten or twelve years was William Henry Huntington, a college friend and classmate, a gentleman of refined tastes in both in my possession, written by Dana, show that the affection which he felt for Huntington was fully shared by every member of his family. With here and there a sugges good time for us all somewhere. My love to Mrs. Cranch, and to you, my dear Huntington, the same steady old affection which never showed a sign of giving out. Oraphy of Gustave Dore. On August 6, 1861, Dana, in a letter to his friend Huntington, commented upon the defeat at Bull Run as an awful blow for which Scott was mn with the Tribune, as heretofore related. On April 11th he wrote again to Huntington. I quote in part as follows: To put my news butt-end first, let me say, Pike, and Parke Godwin, winding up with thanks for the little moral lecture Huntington, his correspondent, had given him on the Cyclopaedia, which he suggested was
Crittenden (search for this): chapter 11
rue, that to suffer the issue to go out as the Democrats had expected it to be made up would be disastrous to us in their part of the Union, What was done finally was in full consideration and agreement, and entirely satisfactory to all sides. When the subject comes up again we must meet it as we best can. We are anxious to draw out some Southern opposition, and this may be expected, if we do not too readily and selfishly appropriate the resistance to it to our own party uses. I expect Mr. Crittenden and Mr. Bell to oppose it, Mr. Hammond to vote against it, and some others, whom I will not name, to be relentless in their support. I see that the Post, usually so very right, calls for a more decided activity on our side. If you can do anything in the emergency to reconcile our friends to the system of defence we are making, you will do a great good. I think ridicule, not pure argument, the most safe and effective way of disposing of it. To talk of the danger of war from it is ju
Gustave Dore (search for this): chapter 11
ch I must prepare the copy for, and then do my part in the revision of the proofs. Then all the afternoon and evening serving the Tribune. However, we keep good spirits and good digestion, and for constitutional ride a horse for two hours daily. . .. The Household Poetry is not published yet, but there is hope for it within a few months. The Cyclopaedia sells pretty well, notwithstanding. Of volume I. five thousand have gone already, and the tide rises still.... Send on a biography of Gustave Dore. On August 6, 1861, Dana, in a letter to his friend Huntington, commented upon the defeat at Bull Run as an awful blow for which Scott was mainly responsible. It had sickened Greeley, and kept him from the office two weeks. It had been made the occasion of his extraordinary card placing the Tribune in leading-strings. It had produced a crisis in all kinds of business as well as in the affairs of the government. It brought the war home to every interest, private as well as public.
grossing as they were, could absorb or afford occupation for all Dana's energy and activity. It must have been early in 1848-as he was in Europe during the last half of that year — that he translated and published a small volume of German Stories and Legends for children, under the title of The Black Ant. Rudolph Garrigue, Astor House, New York, 1848-Tauchnitz, same. It included in its contents The Inkstand, The curious Cockerel, The Christ-child, The Princess Unca, Nut Cracker and sugar Dolly, and twelve others. The last of these was the longest. The little volume received wide circulation, and became most popular with American children, but was noticeable rather from the fact that it was one of the earliest, if not the actual forerunner, of a host which have since appeared both in Europe and America for the sepcial delectation of children. Four years later, in 1852, he edited and prepared for the press a work illustrated with steel engravings, known as Meyer's Universum,
Charles Anderson (search for this): chapter 11
coerce them into subjection. On December 12th it said: We mean to be loyal to the Union, but we will hire nobody, bribe nobody, pay nobody, cajole nobody to remain in it. And now a firmer note is heard: The South Carolina secessionists openly proclaim their intention of treading the stars and stripes under foot. The only security the President can have that Fort Moultrie will not be violently seized upon is the presence of a force sufficient to protect it. After Major Anderson had transferred his little garrison from Fort Moultrie to Fort Sumter, there follows, December 28, 1860, a word of warning as hard as adamant: Let us entreat all who meditate treason to pause ere it is too late, and avoid at once the traitor's crime and his doom. On January 17, 1861: Stand firm! No compromise; no surrender of principle! No cowardly reversal of the great verdict of the sixth of November. Let us have the question of questions settled now and for all time
Southerner Toombs (search for this): chapter 11
m I will not name, to be relentless in their support. I see that the Post, usually so very right, calls for a more decided activity on our side. If you can do anything in the emergency to reconcile our friends to the system of defence we are making, you will do a great good. I think ridicule, not pure argument, the most safe and effective way of disposing of it. To talk of the danger of war from it is just what the movers want us to do. The most effective, the only effective point of Mr. Toombs's reply to me was that when he perverted a remark of mine into a deprecation of war with France and England. It would be killed in an hour if we of the opposition could avow ourselves in favor of such a war. Faithfully yours, William H. Seward. In view of the fact that Seward remained to the date of the inauguration the acknowledged leader of the Free-soilers and Republicans in Congress, and afterwards, as Lincoln's most conspicuous rival for the presidency, was selected to fill
Rothschild (search for this): chapter 11
s now in my possession, written by Dana, show that the affection which he felt for Huntington was fully shared by every member of his family. With here and there a suggestion about business matters or an allusion to the restrictions imposed upon his freedom of action by the Tribune executive committee, these letters abound in friendly gossip about their common acquaintances, the hard times, and the bank suspensions of 1857. On November 24th of that year he enclosed a bill of exchange on Rothschild, and expressed the hope that the house would not stop before paying it. He adds: We are over the agony here, and have passed into a sort of coma or stupor so far as money affairs are concerned. There is nothing doing but gambling in stocks, for which the stock of money which has no industrial or commercial employment affords facilities. For my part I live in the stagnation. Last year I had eight thousand dollars income. Now I have my salary of forty dollars a week, and no great h
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