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Charles Dana (search for this): chapter 11
est Point, the criticism did but little harm to Dana or the book. It must be confessed, however, thto another and far more ambitious undertaking. Dana's indefatigable industry and wide range of readpartnership between Seward, Weed, and himself. Dana naturally favored his political aspirations, anertain as any unproven thing can be that it was Dana's brain which conceived it and Dana's hand thatDana's hand that wrote it. About the middle of May, 1861, the Tribune began to discuss the feasibility of a movemgreement, much less of a positive rupture, till Dana received notice at his desk that his services wd it upon. It is worthy of note, however, that Dana accepted his dismissal, unexpected as it certaiJohnson, one of the board of managers, wrote to Dana on May 27, 1865. In this letter he says: no light on public affairs. The fact is that Dana was for the most part of his life far too busy shot directed against the flag at Fort Sumter, Dana came out for war to the death. The Tribune als[34 more...]
d that wrote it. About the middle of May, 1861, the Tribune began to discuss the feasibility of a movement on Richmond; by the first of June it had begun to cry, Onward, and by the end of that month its columns bristled with: The Nation's war-cry-Forward to Richmond! Forward to Richmond! The Rebel Congress must not be allowed to meet there on July 20th! By that date the place must be held by the National army! And this was kept up with but little variation till the defeat of McDowell's army at Bull Run put a violent end to it. It was for years supposed that Dana himself wrote the article, Forward to Richmond, but Dana said, in later years, that it was written by a regular contributor, Fitz-Henry Warren, of Iowa. There is not the slightest doubt, however, that Dana was directly responsible for its publication, and for its constant reiteration in the columns of the Tribune. It is also certain that when disaster overtook the national army, Greeley made haste to declare
D. Appleton (search for this): chapter 11
wn as The Household Book of Poetry, which he intended should contain whatever was most truly beautiful and admirable among the minor poems of the English language. The work was first given to the world in 1857, through the publishing house of D. Appleton & Company, of New York, and so satisfactory was the collection, and so admirable was the typography, paper, and binding, that it soon found its way into many homes throughout the land. Notwithstanding the liberal and catholic taste with whichramental, not a matter of habit, but of character. He felt that they were radical and irreconcilable, and recognizing Greeley's prior, though far from controlling interest, Greeley at that time owned only three-twentieths of the Tribune. See Appleton, Cyclopaedia of Biography, vol. II., p. 737. chose rather to submit than to resist. No one who knew the men can read this narrative or the Tribune for the period under consideration without reaching the conclusion that while Dana may have be
Annabel Lee (search for this): chapter 11
ratic writer's poems in his first edition, that fact was regarded as conclusive evidence of a sectional bias even in literature. Inasmuch, however, as Poe was born in Boston, and received much of his fragmentary education at West Point, the criticism did but little harm to Dana or the book. It must be confessed, however, that a sharp review in one of the magazines had the merit of calling Dana's attention anew to the whole list of American poets, which resulted in the selection of Poe's Annabel Lee, The Bells, and The Raven, as well as many others from both native and foreign authors, for the next and subsequent editions of the work. The Household Book has been frequently imitated under one name or another. It was thoroughly revised by Dana in 1884, has gone through many editions, and still justly holds its place as the best volume of the kind published in the English language. It is to be observed, however, that the compiler's modesty was too great to permit him to include even
Thurlow Weed (search for this): chapter 11
vision clearer, and his capacity for work greater. There is reason to believe that Dana stood with Greeley in resenting the treatment of the latter by Seward and Weed. It is now known that Greeley, notwithstanding his modesty, his personal peculiarities, and his long and faithful support of his friends as the great men of the E be senator, governor, or a cabinet minister. He might even have accepted a diplomatic mission, and yet this fact seems never to have occurred to either Seward or Weed. Greeley finally became frank enough to avow it, in a pathetic letter which dissolved forever the political partnership between Seward, Weed, and himself. Dana nWeed, and himself. Dana naturally favored his political aspirations, and did what he could to make him governor and senator. He also stood with him in his indifference, if not in his opposition, to the nomination of Seward for the presidency. The Tribune was of course in favor of whomsoever it believed could be elected, and yet it is certain that it did
Parke Godwin (search for this): chapter 11
ting up in his practice, and must be a rich man very soon. When I see him trooping about with his two roan horses, I get vexed at you because you aren't a doctor, too. That was apparently what nature laid you out for, but you've been and stopped her. The next year, after wondering how he ever found time to write at all, he wrote a long letter about the Cyclopaedia, the book of poetry, and also about their common friends, Bayard Taylor, George William Curtis, Count Gurowski, Pike, and Parke Godwin, winding up with thanks for the little moral lecture Huntington, his correspondent, had given him on the Cyclopaedia, which he suggested was not needed, because he probably knew its faults and the difficulties attending its composition and publication better than any one else. With the first shot directed against the flag at Fort Sumter, Dana came out for war to the death. The Tribune also buckled on its armor and warned traitors of their doom. The administration had already begun to
Herman J. Meyer (search for this): chapter 11
t the actual forerunner, of a host which have since appeared both in Europe and America for the sepcial delectation of children. Four years later, in 1852, he edited and prepared for the press a work illustrated with steel engravings, known as Meyer's Universum, Herman J. Meyer, 164 William Street, New York, 1852. or views of the most remarkable places and objects of all countries. It had already met with considerable success in Europe, and especially in Germany, and it was thought thatHerman J. Meyer, 164 William Street, New York, 1852. or views of the most remarkable places and objects of all countries. It had already met with considerable success in Europe, and especially in Germany, and it was thought that it would be well received in this country. The work was not without merit. The text was clear and interesting, while the engravings were exceedingly well done for the period. The last article of the volume was an historical sketch of the General Post-office at Washington, written by Dana himself. It gave a succinct account of the origin and growth of the postal service in the United States, and called attention to the fact that: This vast machine, when wielded by an unscrupulous and
Dred Scott (search for this): chapter 11
wever, we keep good spirits and good digestion, and for constitutional ride a horse for two hours daily. . .. The Household Poetry is not published yet, but there is hope for it within a few months. The Cyclopaedia sells pretty well, notwithstanding. Of volume I. five thousand have gone already, and the tide rises still.... Send on a biography of Gustave Dore. On August 6, 1861, Dana, in a letter to his friend Huntington, commented upon the defeat at Bull Run as an awful blow for which Scott was mainly responsible. It had sickened Greeley, and kept him from the office two weeks. It had been made the occasion of his extraordinary card placing the Tribune in leading-strings. It had produced a crisis in all kinds of business as well as in the affairs of the government. It brought the war home to every interest, private as well as public. It cut down the income of the Tribune, and curtailed the sale of books. Ruin seemed to be staring every one in the face, editors and writers
Fitz-Henry Warren (search for this): chapter 11
with: The Nation's war-cry-Forward to Richmond! Forward to Richmond! The Rebel Congress must not be allowed to meet there on July 20th! By that date the place must be held by the National army! And this was kept up with but little variation till the defeat of McDowell's army at Bull Run put a violent end to it. It was for years supposed that Dana himself wrote the article, Forward to Richmond, but Dana said, in later years, that it was written by a regular contributor, Fitz-Henry Warren, of Iowa. There is not the slightest doubt, however, that Dana was directly responsible for its publication, and for its constant reiteration in the columns of the Tribune. It is also certain that when disaster overtook the national army, Greeley made haste to declare, in a letter dated July 23d, filling an entire column of the Tribune, over his own signature: I wish to be distinctly understood as not seeking to be relieved from any responsibility for urging the advance of the
s the Democrats had expected it to be made up would be disastrous to us in their part of the Union, What was done finally was in full consideration and agreement, and entirely satisfactory to all sides. When the subject comes up again we must meet it as we best can. We are anxious to draw out some Southern opposition, and this may be expected, if we do not too readily and selfishly appropriate the resistance to it to our own party uses. I expect Mr. Crittenden and Mr. Bell to oppose it, Mr. Hammond to vote against it, and some others, whom I will not name, to be relentless in their support. I see that the Post, usually so very right, calls for a more decided activity on our side. If you can do anything in the emergency to reconcile our friends to the system of defence we are making, you will do a great good. I think ridicule, not pure argument, the most safe and effective way of disposing of it. To talk of the danger of war from it is just what the movers want us to do. The mo
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