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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). Search the whole document.

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's Life of Patrick Henry (1817) is much unlike Marshall's book. It was well written—Wirt had a polished style—but it was a hasty and inadequate picture of a most important life. A better but less readable biography was William Tudor's Life of James Otis (1823). Mrs. Mercy Otis Warren (1728-1814), See also Book I, Chap. IX, and Book II. Chap. II. a sister of James Otis, was the wife of James Warren of Boston. Her three-volume History of the American Revolution (1805), a loosely written bJames Otis, was the wife of James Warren of Boston. Her three-volume History of the American Revolution (1805), a loosely written book which contained many biographical sketches, was popular and for a long time furnished the average New Englander his knowledge of the Revolution. Five years earlier had appeared the most successful historical book of the day, Weems's Life of Washington. The author was a versatile man, who could be buffoon, fiddler, parson, or hawker of his book as occasion demanded. He had not known Washington, but he created the impression that he wrote from personal knowledge by announcing himself as for
Dexter Professor (search for this): chapter 1.7
muse of American history descended from her stump, and recounting her narrative in a key adapted to our own ears. An historian who did not liberate himself entirely from patriotic bias was John Gorham Palfrey (1798-1881). Although he falls slightly without the limits of time assigned to this chapter, he was by nature and purpose a member of what has been called the filio-pietistic group. Bred a Unitarian minister, and pastor for a time of Brattle Square Church, Boston, he served as Dexter Professor of Sacred Literature in Harvard University (1830-39). From 1836 to 1843 he was editor of The North American review. He held several political offices in his State, and was a member of Congress in 1847– 49. From 1861 to 1867 he was postmaster of Boston. He wrote many tracts, religious, political, and historical. Nevertheless, he kept true to his love for the history of New England. In 1858-64 he brought out in three volumes a History of New England during the Stuart Dynasty. It won
Mercy Otis Warren (search for this): chapter 1.7
ist opinions. It displeased the followers of Jefferson but had a wide circulation among those who did not agree with the great Republican leader. For posterity it has value chiefly as a solid source of information. Wirt's Life of Patrick Henry (1817) is much unlike Marshall's book. It was well written—Wirt had a polished style—but it was a hasty and inadequate picture of a most important life. A better but less readable biography was William Tudor's Life of James Otis (1823). Mrs. Mercy Otis Warren (1728-1814), See also Book I, Chap. IX, and Book II. Chap. II. a sister of James Otis, was the wife of James Warren of Boston. Her three-volume History of the American Revolution (1805), a loosely written book which contained many biographical sketches, was popular and for a long time furnished the average New Englander his knowledge of the Revolution. Five years earlier had appeared the most successful historical book of the day, Weems's Life of Washington. The author was a ve
Thomas Dunn English (search for this): chapter 1.7
full of taste and eloquence; full of life and power. You give us not wretched paste-board men; not a sort of chronological table, with the dates written out at length, after the manner of most historians;—but you give us real, individual, living, men and women, with their passions, interests, and peculiarities. Theodore Parker wrote: I think you are likely to make, what I long since told you I looked for from you, the most noble and splendid piece of historical composition, not only in English, but in any tongue. Emerson said of the History: It is noble matter, and I am heartily glad to have it nobly treated. Bancroft is less than a quarter of a century dead, and these beautiful laurels are already withered. A new age has accepted other standards than his. Bancroft, our first historian who had studied in Germany, was well known at home and abroad as a hard student and a man of great learning. The abundant foot-notes in the first volumes of his history show how freely he u
Jedidiah Morse (search for this): chapter 1.7
Society his own manuscripts. One of the friends of Belknap and Hazard—and a connection of Hazard's by marriage—was Jedidiah Morse (1761-1826), minister at Charlestown, Massachusetts. He was the author of the first American geography (1789), a booon (1824), a compilation which posterity does not esteem highly. But it served its day, and was for a time widely read. Morse was probably indebted to Hazard and Belknap for the impetus that set him to writing. The latter complained that it was only Morse who could make money out of what he wrote. When Morse published his thin work, two other men, Jared Sparks and Peter Force, were planning much greater enterprises. One was a New England man, a Harvard graduate, a minister of accepted sMorse published his thin work, two other men, Jared Sparks and Peter Force, were planning much greater enterprises. One was a New England man, a Harvard graduate, a minister of accepted standing, and a member of the most select literary circle of Boston. The other was a self-taught printer's boy who became publisher and editor, with a passion for collecting. Each served well the cause of historical research. Jared Sparks was bo
John D. Burk (search for this): chapter 1.7
798-1803). The books were well written and have maintained their credit. Here should be mentioned Henry M. Brackenridge's (1786-1871) History of the Western Insurrection (1817), a fair-minded narrative of the Whisky Insurrection, which was very popular and ran through several editions. Three Southern books which may here be spoken of are hardly up to the standard of the state histories. Dr. Ramsay's History of South Carolina (2 vols., 1809) was not equal to his work on the Revolution. John D. Burk (d. 1808) wrote a less valuable work in his History of Virginia (3 vols., 1804-05). After his death the book was continued in a fourth volume. He was an ardent Republican who rhapsodized on liberty. Dr. Hugh Williamson (1735-1819), who wrote a History of North Carolina (2 vols., 1812), was a Pennsylvanian by birth, clergyman and physician by education, merchant and politician by necessity. He lived a while in Edenton, North Carolina, was elected a member of the Continental Congress,
Ebenezer Hazard (search for this): chapter 1.7
ith the struggle for national existence. Ebenezer Hazard, in 1779, described the situation as follg history made appeal. It is not strange that Hazard had few people to encourage him. Our post-Ry of that kind was due to the interest of Ebenezer Hazard (1744-1817) and Jeremy Belknap. Born thet forward in the two decades after the war. Hazard first of the two began to collect documents. as not realized, and there is no evidence that Hazard used the money voted. Dismissed from the offiinuation. Judged by what he published merely, Hazard had only a moderate influence on history in theral reader with such a collection that caused Hazard's publication to remain unsold, and to be a source of discouragement to its compiler. Hazard influenced the work of Belknap, who, as a ministerire. Financially it was as great a failure as Hazard's Collections. It was many years before he soends of Belknap and Hazard—and a connection of Hazard's by marriage—was Jedidiah Morse (1761-1826), [3 more...]<
William Bradford (search for this): chapter 1.7
w England in four handy volumes. So far as the mere statement of facts goes, it is safe to say that Palfrey has given us a complete and sufficient history of colonial New England. He has not been careless or slothful. But to Palfrey all that New Englanders did and thought was good. He did not question the spirit of Puritanism, and he did not find its narrowness unpleasant; he accepted it as a thing of course. He was the last of the complacent defenders of the old regime in the land of Bradford and Winthrop. Before he had retired from the scene Charles Francis Adams's severe blows were beginning to tell. Over against these books from the North we must place a Southern history, the existence of which was due to the belief that the South had not received fair consideration at the hands of men who knew little about its life and natural environment. Such a book was George Tucker's (1775-1861) History of the United States (4 vols., 1856-58), which carried the story of the national
John Marshall (search for this): chapter 1.7
wrote about the Revolution, in one phase or another, the best were the Rev. William Gordon, Dr. David Ramsay, William Henry Drayton, General William Moultrie, John Marshall, and William Wirt. Less scholarly but more widely influential were Mrs. Mercy Warren and Parson Weems. Gordon, who was born in England, preached at Roxburyt South Carolinians, one a political and the other a military defender of the Whig cause. Each wrote an excellent account of what he had seen in his own state. Marshall See also Book II, Chap. XV. and Wirt See also Book II, Chaps. I and III. were Virginia lawyers who thought it their duty to portray the lives of two greaagree with the great Republican leader. For posterity it has value chiefly as a solid source of information. Wirt's Life of Patrick Henry (1817) is much unlike Marshall's book. It was well written—Wirt had a polished style—but it was a hasty and inadequate picture of a most important life. A better but less readable biography
Jeremy Belknap (search for this): chapter 1.7
nterest of Ebenezer Hazard (1744-1817) and Jeremy Belknap. Born the same year, they both graduated ts compiler. Hazard influenced the work of Belknap, who, as a minister in Dover, New Hampshire, opies to pay the printer, but, unlike Hazard, Belknap was not discouraged. Having resigned his pare author's best style. For the same magazine Belknap also wrote a series of satirical letters dealters (1792), enlarged in an edition of 1796. Belknap died suddenly, in the midst of literary schem preserving historical memorials. Probably Belknap's greatest service was his efforts in foundinin 1791, in accordance with plans prepared by Belknap. The membership was limited to thirty corressh historical materials. As long as he lived Belknap was a most active member, visiting nearby towhis own manuscripts. One of the friends of Belknap and Hazard—and a connection of Hazard's by mad. Morse was probably indebted to Hazard and Belknap for the impetus that set him to writing. The[3 more...]
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