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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). Search the whole document.

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George Bancroft (search for this): chapter 1.7
who fall within this chapter's limits is George Bancroft, who, during his lifetime, held a larger the cabinet, supreme court judges, and—Mr. George Bancroft. Bancroft was born in Massachusetts Bancroft was born in Massachusetts in 1800 and died in Washington in 1891. Having graduated from Harvard in 1817, he went to Gottingenorthampton, Massachusetts. As a schoolmaster Bancroft was a failure, and he retired from the schoola ready and effective writer. At this time Bancroft had begun to support the Democratic party. Hken a task like his. They were all didactic. Bancroft produced a work of a different character. ThI am heartily glad to have it nobly treated. Bancroft is less than a quarter of a century dead, andage has accepted other standards than his. Bancroft, our first historian who had studied in Germahistory. In the preface of his first volume, Bancroft wrote: The United States of America constitutto show us how little of an author he was. Bancroft and Sparks collected documents, and Sparks pu[1 more...]
George Washington (search for this): chapter 1.7
story of the Revolution. While preparing the edition of Washington he learned from President John Quincy Adams that in 1818tion was demanded by the politicians. The writings of Washington now occupied Sparks's time, but before they began to appn 1834 appeared Volume II of The life and writings of George Washington, and the rest of the twelve volumes followed regularldence of the American Revolution, a series of letters to Washington in four volumes. Sparks's letters are full of his grehan in the original]. You have done exactly what I think Washington would have desired you to do, if he were living. I canns put to his mettle to defend himself. It is known that Washington in his old age corrected many of his letters which he ha Sparks sought excuse in saying that this indicated that Washington wished all his letters revised, and that he had merely done what Washington himself would have done. Needless to say, this excuse did not satisfy the critics. The controversy pro
Jared Sparks (search for this): chapter 1.7
rse published his thin work, two other men, Jared Sparks and Peter Force, were planning much greaterd well the cause of historical research. Jared Sparks was born at Willington, Connecticut, in 178South <*> Unitarian minister in Baltimore gave Sparks a national <*> and probably stimulated his int $19,000 besides an annual salary of $2200. Sparks gave up the Review to devote himself to historns. The writings of Washington now occupied Sparks's time, but before they began to appear he bros of letters to Washington in four volumes. Sparks's letters are full of his greater plan, and hewo copies of certain letters, one published by Sparks and one by Reed. Sharp eyes soon discovered des. Then followed a long controversy in which Sparks was put to his mettle to defend himself. It iroduction of documents. It should be said for Sparks that many others of his time thought that an eow little of an author he was. Bancroft and Sparks collected documents, and Sparks published docu[13 more...]
Frank P. Blair (search for this): chapter 1.7
retary Van Buren that the work be continued through the period of the Continental Congress. Van Buren agreed, and Congress passed the necessary act, but at the last moment the new secretary of state, Edward Livingston, made the contract with Frank P. Blair. Livingston blandly admitted that Sparks should have had the appointment but said that Blair's selection was demanded by the politicians. The writings of Washington now occupied Sparks's time, but before they began to appear he brought oBlair's selection was demanded by the politicians. The writings of Washington now occupied Sparks's time, but before they began to appear he brought out The life of Gouverneur Morris (1832), in three volumes. In 1834 appeared Volume II of The life and writings of George Washington, and the rest of the twelve volumes followed regularly until the series was complete in 1837. The last to appear was the biography, the first volume in the set. The general verdict of the day was that it was a work worthy of the exalted subject. From 1836 to 1840 was published The works of Benjamin Franklin, in ten volumes, and between 1834 and 1838 came the fir
John P. Rives (search for this): chapter 1.7
appeared, and in 1840 the third volume. Such was the feeling that in 1843 the publishers had not been paid for the third volume and could not get $6000 of the amount due on the second. Under these circumstances a compromise was made. The publishers agreed that the series should not exceed twenty volumes at a maximum average cost of $20,400 each, and that the secretary of state should approve the materials offered for publication. About this time Clarke sold his interest in the series to Rives, the partner of F. P. Blair. For several years matters now proceeded satisfactorily. The fourth volume appeared in 1843, the fifth in 1844, and the sixth, completing the fourth series, in 1846. The first volume of the fifth series came in 1848, the second in 1851, and the third in 1853. Marcy was secretary of state in 1855, and when the material for the fourth volume was submitted, he refused to approve it in any part. To Force he said: I do not believe in your work, sir! It is of n
Timothy Pitkin (search for this): chapter 1.7
1765. Accuracy of statement and a spiritless style are the chief characteristics of the work. Somewhat later came Timothy Pitkin's (1766-1847) Political and Civil history of the United States (2 vols., 1828). The author was a man of great industrn. Although it is marked by accuracy and a just sense of industrial development, its style is disjointed and difficult. Pitkin strove for fairness, but he saw the history of the country as a man of New England would see it. His own section bulked large in his treatment, and he did not get the point of view of the rest of the Union. Twenty-one years after Pitkin's book was published, New England found a still abler and more satisfying historian in Richard Hildreth (1807-65), who in 1849 gavenited States from the discovery of the American continent. At the time neither Hildreth nor Tucker had written, and only Pitkin, Holmes, and Trumbull had undertaken a task like his. They were all didactic. Bancroft produced a work of a different ch
A. H. L. Heeren (search for this): chapter 1.7
er of a century dead, and these beautiful laurels are already withered. A new age has accepted other standards than his. Bancroft, our first historian who had studied in Germany, was well known at home and abroad as a hard student and a man of great learning. The abundant foot-notes in the first volumes of his history show how freely he used the sources in foreign languages. His experience in Germany led him to admire German scholarship in all its phases. At Gottingen he studied under Heeren, who was stressing the unity of history. In the preface of his first volume, Bancroft wrote: The United States of America constitute an essential portion of a great political system, embracing all the political nations of the earth. He did not, however, try to work out this theory in his volume, but told, like others, the story of voyages, settlements, colonies, and the common struggle for freedom. His progress was leisurely. The second volume appeared three years after the first, the
Benning Wentworth (search for this): chapter 1.7
possible to present the history of a people in a collection of documents. It was his failure to satisfy the general reader with such a collection that caused Hazard's publication to remain unsold, and to be a source of discouragement to its compiler. Hazard influenced the work of Belknap, who, as a minister in Dover, New Hampshire, from 1767 to 1778, early became interested in the history of the colony and began to collect documents relating to it. In this task he was aided by Governor Benning Wentworth. Though Belknap had doubts about the propriety of a minister's dabbling in history, the inclination was too strong to be resisted; and receiving encouragement from his friends, he proceeded as he had begun. In 1784 he published the first volume of his History of New Hampshire. Financially it was as great a failure as Hazard's Collections. It was many years before he sold enough copies to pay the printer, but, unlike Hazard, Belknap was not discouraged. Having resigned his pari
William Henry Drayton (search for this): chapter 1.7
me of them wrote well and displayed great industry. The stream was wider than formerly, but it was not so deep. Of those who wrote about the Revolution, in one phase or another, the best were the Rev. William Gordon, Dr. David Ramsay, William Henry Drayton, General William Moultrie, John Marshall, and William Wirt. Less scholarly but more widely influential were Mrs. Mercy Warren and Parson Weems. Gordon, who was born in England, preached at Roxbury, Massachusetts, from 1770 to 1786. Hnd History of the American Revolution (1789) were well received by an uncritical generation. It remained for a later age to discover that the second of these books, long accepted as an original work, was largely drawn from The annual register. Drayton and Moultrie were prominent South Carolinians, one a political and the other a military defender of the Whig cause. Each wrote an excellent account of what he had seen in his own state. Marshall See also Book II, Chap. XV. and Wirt See
Benjamin Franklin (search for this): chapter 1.7
upied Sparks's time, but before they began to appear he brought out The life of Gouverneur Morris (1832), in three volumes. In 1834 appeared Volume II of The life and writings of George Washington, and the rest of the twelve volumes followed regularly until the series was complete in 1837. The last to appear was the biography, the first volume in the set. The general verdict of the day was that it was a work worthy of the exalted subject. From 1836 to 1840 was published The works of Benjamin Franklin, in ten volumes, and between 1834 and 1838 came the first series, and between 1844 and 1847 the second series, of The Library of American biography, in all twenty-five volumes. In 1853 he issued The correspondence of the American Revolution, a series of letters to Washington in four volumes. Sparks's letters are full of his greater plan, and he recurred to the idea again and again until he was an old man, but he did not carry out his purpose. In fact, Sparks suffered an eclipse ab
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