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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4. Search the whole document.

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June 7th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 3
an hour since the session began. May 30, 1862. Works, vol. VII. pp. 110, 111. Near the end of the session he spoke forcibly against a final adjournment until the public business was completed, pointing out that Congress was by several weeks short of the limit which it was accustomed to reach when members were paid by the day instead of by the year. July 12 (Works, vol. VII. pp. 176-179). He had made similar remarks May 22 (Congressional Globe, p. 2225). The New York Evening Post, June 7, 1862, had an article of the same tenor. In declining an invitation to attend a public meeting in the city of New York, he said, A senator cannot leave his place more than a soldier. July 14, 1862. Works, vol. VII. pp. 180, 181. It has often occurred in the Senate,—and it occurred many times during this session, in which the duties of patriotism were most exacting,—that it was obliged to adjourn for want of a quorum, or for want of the attendance of a sufficient number to make its acti
May 5th, 1866 AD (search for this): chapter 3
setts really thought the Senate ought to adjourn; and three days later (Globe, pp. 733, 734) he referred to Sumner's chronic difficult about adjournments. Similar pressure from Sumner, with similar resistance from other senators who recalled his uniform position on the suspension of business, will be found in the record of later sessions (June 25, 1864, Globe, p. 3263; July 2, 1864, Works, vol. IX. pp. 55-63; July 26, 1866, Globe, pp. 4166, 4167; Dec. 14, 1868, Globe, p. 68; Dec. 15, 1869; May 5, 6, and 20, 1870, Globe, pp. 137, 3239, 3274, 3277, 3658; Feb 15, 1871, Globe, p. 1262). Thurman's tribute, April 27, 1874 (Globe, p. 3400), referred to Sumner's high estimate of the effect of full discussion. His persistence in opposing a limitation of the session, even under the oppressive heat of the summer, brought him sometimes into collision with senators who, though not laggards, took a less exacting view of official duty, or who thought, sometimes quite rightly, that enough had alre
May 16th, 1868 AD (search for this): chapter 3
hich the duties of patriotism were most exacting,—that it was obliged to adjourn for want of a quorum, or for want of the attendance of a sufficient number to make its action decisive. Sumner's vacant chair, while he was in health, was never an obstruction to public business. Again and again, at this and at other sessions, as the official record shows, he protested against an early adjournment in the afternoon, and urged that the Senate go on with its calendar. Henderson of Missouri (May 16, 1868, Congressional Globe, p. 2494) referred to Sumner's constant votes against adjournments until after five or six P. M., and against final adjournments even in July or August, saying. If the senator had his way, he would remain here forever and ever. Edmunds said in relation to his opposition, April 17. 1869 (Globe, p. 726), I never knew the day to come when my friend from Massachusetts really thought the Senate ought to adjourn; and three days later (Globe, pp. 733, 734) he referred to S
ation of his means to secure them, must possess the sympathy and respect of all good citizens; sixth, he is very amiable; and seventh, a man whose decorum of character and whose talents have done and are doing more than those of any other man in the Senate to arrest the gradual decline of that body in the estimation of the country, in itself a service which those who feel the important role the Senate ought to play in our constitutional system know how to appreciate. Mr. Bigelow added in 1886 the following memorandum to complete what he had said twenty-five years before:— Though a man of strong feeling, Mr. Sumner was distinguished for the marvellous control which he always exerted over his passions. In this respect he had an advantage over most of the conspicuous public men of his time. He never seemed to entertain—at least I never saw him exhibit—any resentment. When the names of his political assailants were mentioned in his presence, he took his revenge with a smile. <
March 31st, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 3
the effect of full discussion. His persistence in opposing a limitation of the session, even under the oppressive heat of the summer, brought him sometimes into collision with senators who, though not laggards, took a less exacting view of official duty, or who thought, sometimes quite rightly, that enough had already been done, and what remained would ripen for better action during the vacation. July 2, 1864 (Works, vol. IX. pp. 55-63; Globe, p. 3502). June 25, 1864 (Globe, p. 3263). March 31 and April 7 and 8, 1869 (Globe, pp. 384, 607, 609). Sumner's superlative fidelity may be thought finical, but it attests the seriousness with which he regarded all public duties. Sumner's presence in the Senate was always one of dignity, such as became the office and place. He never descended to frivolity; he did not, as is the habit of restless members, keep passing from seat to seat, indulging in small talk with one or another, but remained mostly in his own; Douglas's swagger up a
July 12th (search for this): chapter 3
six months after the session began), he remarked that he had not been absent from his seat three minutes since it was taken up, or half an hour since the session began. May 30, 1862. Works, vol. VII. pp. 110, 111. Near the end of the session he spoke forcibly against a final adjournment until the public business was completed, pointing out that Congress was by several weeks short of the limit which it was accustomed to reach when members were paid by the day instead of by the year. July 12 (Works, vol. VII. pp. 176-179). He had made similar remarks May 22 (Congressional Globe, p. 2225). The New York Evening Post, June 7, 1862, had an article of the same tenor. In declining an invitation to attend a public meeting in the city of New York, he said, A senator cannot leave his place more than a soldier. July 14, 1862. Works, vol. VII. pp. 180, 181. It has often occurred in the Senate,—and it occurred many times during this session, in which the duties of patriotism were
April 27th, 1874 AD (search for this): chapter 3
longer imposed reserve, testified to the power of his personality. Eulogies in Congress, April 27, 1874. Congressional Globe, pp. 3399-3406, 3409-3419. On the day when they summed up his relation0, Globe, pp. 137, 3239, 3274, 3277, 3658; Feb 15, 1871, Globe, p. 1262). Thurman's tribute, April 27, 1874 (Globe, p. 3400), referred to Sumner's high estimate of the effect of full discussion. His rm observance of rules and courtesies in the Senate was referred to in tributes in Congress, April 27, 1874, by Pratt of Indiana in the Senate (Congressional Globe, p. 3403), and by E. R. Hoar in the d with respect to what his associates said in debate; Thurman said of him in his tribute, April 27, 1874 (Congressional Globe, p. 3400), He spoke often and elaborately himself; and he was the best,ny of his friends had any connection with the legislation he advocated. Senator Pratt said, April 27. 1874: No lobbyist ever approached him with doubtful prepositions. No one could count upon his vo
May 30th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 3
ich is very unusual, by the way. and the same tribute is Sumner's due. No private errand and no listlessness kept him from his public duty; and he attended with severe punctuality the sessions of his committee and of the Senate. When the Internal Tax bill, which had consumed many days of discussion, was pending (nearly six months after the session began), he remarked that he had not been absent from his seat three minutes since it was taken up, or half an hour since the session began. May 30, 1862. Works, vol. VII. pp. 110, 111. Near the end of the session he spoke forcibly against a final adjournment until the public business was completed, pointing out that Congress was by several weeks short of the limit which it was accustomed to reach when members were paid by the day instead of by the year. July 12 (Works, vol. VII. pp. 176-179). He had made similar remarks May 22 (Congressional Globe, p. 2225). The New York Evening Post, June 7, 1862, had an article of the same tenor.
March 31st, 1871 AD (search for this): chapter 3
him unbidden for protection. (Federal States, vol. i. pp. 236-237 ) Mrs. Janet Chase Hoyt, daughter of Chief-Justice Chase, incorporates the above description into one of her own, adding further details of Sumner's manner in the society of friends. New York Tribune, April 5, 1891. Edward Everett, in a eulogy, likened the fidelity of John Quincy Adams to his seat in the House of Representatives, to that of a marble column of the Capitol to its pedestal; Senator Casserly referred, March 31, 1871, to Sumner as the senator whom I do not see in his seat, which is very unusual, by the way. and the same tribute is Sumner's due. No private errand and no listlessness kept him from his public duty; and he attended with severe punctuality the sessions of his committee and of the Senate. When the Internal Tax bill, which had consumed many days of discussion, was pending (nearly six months after the session began), he remarked that he had not been absent from his seat three minutes since
July 2nd, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 3
icult about adjournments. Similar pressure from Sumner, with similar resistance from other senators who recalled his uniform position on the suspension of business, will be found in the record of later sessions (June 25, 1864, Globe, p. 3263; July 2, 1864, Works, vol. IX. pp. 55-63; July 26, 1866, Globe, pp. 4166, 4167; Dec. 14, 1868, Globe, p. 68; Dec. 15, 1869; May 5, 6, and 20, 1870, Globe, pp. 137, 3239, 3274, 3277, 3658; Feb 15, 1871, Globe, p. 1262). Thurman's tribute, April 27, 1874 (Glo collision with senators who, though not laggards, took a less exacting view of official duty, or who thought, sometimes quite rightly, that enough had already been done, and what remained would ripen for better action during the vacation. July 2, 1864 (Works, vol. IX. pp. 55-63; Globe, p. 3502). June 25, 1864 (Globe, p. 3263). March 31 and April 7 and 8, 1869 (Globe, pp. 384, 607, 609). Sumner's superlative fidelity may be thought finical, but it attests the seriousness with which he regar
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