hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Charles Sumner 2,831 1 Browse Search
George Sumner 784 0 Browse Search
Saturday Seward 476 0 Browse Search
Hamilton Fish 446 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 360 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 342 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant 328 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 308 0 Browse Search
H. C. Sumner 288 0 Browse Search
Dominican Republic (Dominican Republic) 216 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4. Search the whole document.

Found 241 total hits in 123 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...
Edward Dicey (search for this): chapter 3
ttention of a stranger and make him a chief among ten thousand. D. D. Pratt. Another said: You will remember his commanding presence, his stalwart frame (six feet and four inches in height), the vigor and grace of his motions, the charm of his manners, the polish of his rhetoric, the abundance of his learning, the fervor and impressiveness of his oratory. He was every inch a senator, and upheld with zeal and fidelity the dignity, privileges, and authority of the Senate. E. R. Hoar. Edward Dicey, who visited the United States at this period, described the senator as that great, sturdy, English-looking figure, with the broad, massive forehead, over which the rich mass of nut-brown hair, streaked here and there with a line of gray, hangs loosely; with the deep blue eyes, and the strangely winning smile,—half bright, half full of sadness. He is a man whom you would notice amongst other men, and whom not knowing you would turn round and look at as he passed by you. Sitting in his pl
George B. Upton (search for this): chapter 3
ty and the general confidence in his efficiency that the people of his State confided to him their interests in pending legislation, or in business with the departments, rather than to others who had passed their lives in professional, industrial, or commercial pursuits. The Congressional Globe's Index for the session (1860-1862) will show how much more Sumner attended to the details of the internal tax bill than his colleague, who had been a manufacturer, but was lacking in method. George B. Upton, a leading Boston merchant for a long period, familiar with public men, a friend of Webster, and long regarding Sumner as a mere enthusiast, thus gave his testimony in a letter, Jan. 28, 1869: I neglected to say a single word in relation to your re-election to the Senate. Whatever differences of opinion have heretofore existed, or may now exist, I desire to put this simple testimony in writing, that of all the gentlemen who have formerly represented Massachusetts, or who now have that
George F. Edmunds (search for this): chapter 3
ublic business. Again and again, at this and at other sessions, as the official record shows, he protested against an early adjournment in the afternoon, and urged that the Senate go on with its calendar. Henderson of Missouri (May 16, 1868, Congressional Globe, p. 2494) referred to Sumner's constant votes against adjournments until after five or six P. M., and against final adjournments even in July or August, saying. If the senator had his way, he would remain here forever and ever. Edmunds said in relation to his opposition, April 17. 1869 (Globe, p. 726), I never knew the day to come when my friend from Massachusetts really thought the Senate ought to adjourn; and three days later (Globe, pp. 733, 734) he referred to Sumner's chronic difficult about adjournments. Similar pressure from Sumner, with similar resistance from other senators who recalled his uniform position on the suspension of business, will be found in the record of later sessions (June 25, 1864, Globe, p. 326
Hannibal Hamlin (search for this): chapter 3
nd every mail at this time, and indeed during his entire service in Congress, brought him a large number of letters from this class, in which they stated, often at great length, their hopes and fears, and their interest in the various measures concerning slavery. Wendell Phillips delivered a lecture in Washington in March, 1862, probably his first visit to the capital. He had an interview with Mr. Lincoln, and was introduced by Sumner on the floor of the Senate, where he was greeted by Mr. Hamlin, the Vice-Presidentdent, who left the chair to take his hand. Sumner's rooms while he was in the Senate were more sought than those of any member of either house. Among the visitors were writers for public journals, friends from Massachusetts, politicians from all parts of the country, survivors of the old antislavery guard, and distinguished foreigners. They often came late in the evening and staved long; and his only way of dismissing them was, when he was on familiar terms with hi
D. D. Pratt (search for this): chapter 3
D. Conger. One said: He was a man of such mark in his mere exterior as to arrest at once the attention of a stranger and make him a chief among ten thousand. D. D. Pratt. Another said: You will remember his commanding presence, his stalwart frame (six feet and four inches in height), the vigor and grace of his motions, the charmas when obliged to stay in his seat. Sumner's uniform observance of rules and courtesies in the Senate was referred to in tributes in Congress, April 27, 1874, by Pratt of Indiana in the Senate (Congressional Globe, p. 3403), and by E. R. Hoar in the House (Globe, p. 3410). He was accustomed to make protests against scandalous conerous supporters of every progressive measure; and yet nobody ever charged that he or any of his friends had any connection with the legislation he advocated. Senator Pratt said, April 27. 1874: No lobbyist ever approached him with doubtful prepositions. No one could count upon his vote unless the measure was one which commanded
Salmon P. Chase (search for this): chapter 3
would turn round and look at as he passed by you. Sitting in his place in the Senate, leaning backwards in his chair, with his head stooping slightly over that great broad chest, and his hands resting upon his crossed legs, he looks in dress and attitude and air the very model of an English country gentleman. A child would ask him the time in the streets, and a woman would come to him unbidden for protection. (Federal States, vol. i. pp. 236-237 ) Mrs. Janet Chase Hoyt, daughter of Chief-Justice Chase, incorporates the above description into one of her own, adding further details of Sumner's manner in the society of friends. New York Tribune, April 5, 1891. Edward Everett, in a eulogy, likened the fidelity of John Quincy Adams to his seat in the House of Representatives, to that of a marble column of the Capitol to its pedestal; Senator Casserly referred, March 31, 1871, to Sumner as the senator whom I do not see in his seat, which is very unusual, by the way. and the same t
B. R. Wood (search for this): chapter 3
communication with a large proportion of the legations and consulates of the United States, from which came statements of their needs and the aspect of our Civil War as it was regarded at their posts, and advice as to modes of enlisting foreign opinion in our favor. Among correspondents of this class at this time were John Bigelow, Henry Adams, J. E. Harvey, W. S. Thayer, Seth Webb, Jr., J. S. Pike, B. Taylor, J. R. Giddings, T. Corwin. Carl Schurz. II. J. Perry, C. D. Cleveland, and B. R. Wood. No one outside of the state department had at command equal sources of information of this kind. He was the one senator to whom advanced antislavery men looked for the expression and promotion of their views; and every mail at this time, and indeed during his entire service in Congress, brought him a large number of letters from this class, in which they stated, often at great length, their hopes and fears, and their interest in the various measures concerning slavery. Wendell Phill
Charles Sumner (search for this): chapter 3
n two kindred characters,— John Bright and Charles Sumner. See estimates in W. H. Channing's Lifes praise and dispraise. J. W. Forney wrote of Sumner (Anecdotes of public Men, vol. II. p. 262): Wen to Washington on business, and have asked Mr. Sumner's aid,—it would be difficult, if not impossi have ever sent to Congress. The period of Sumner's chairmanship of the committee on foreign re an eminent judge,—John Lowell, of Boston. and Sumner did as much of it as most men holding his relaon among those who were as free as himself. Sumner's style was deliberate. He sometimes introducafter his return from this country to France. Sumner's intimate communication with foreigners, at all think of the senator from Massachusetts. Sumner's admirers often named their children for him.s, who as a class had not looked with favor on Sumner. Daily intercourse, as was often the case, chton, as well as at Boston and on the seashore, Sumner was always welcome to lodge or dine. The in[13 more...
Wendell Phillips (search for this): chapter 3
B. R. Wood. No one outside of the state department had at command equal sources of information of this kind. He was the one senator to whom advanced antislavery men looked for the expression and promotion of their views; and every mail at this time, and indeed during his entire service in Congress, brought him a large number of letters from this class, in which they stated, often at great length, their hopes and fears, and their interest in the various measures concerning slavery. Wendell Phillips delivered a lecture in Washington in March, 1862, probably his first visit to the capital. He had an interview with Mr. Lincoln, and was introduced by Sumner on the floor of the Senate, where he was greeted by Mr. Hamlin, the Vice-Presidentdent, who left the chair to take his hand. Sumner's rooms while he was in the Senate were more sought than those of any member of either house. Among the visitors were writers for public journals, friends from Massachusetts, politicians from all
Francis Lieber (search for this): chapter 3
istory and philosophy. Among American statesmen, those whom he most resembled in this respect are Jefferson, Edward Livingston, and John Quincy Adams. He never valued his own opinion so highly that he was not ready to sit at the feet of the masters of science. He was always prone to test public questions, not by apparent and transient exigencies, but by principles permanent and fundamental. It was for this reason that during the Civil War and reconstruction period he consulted so often Dr. Lieber, a publicist, living apart from political management, whose knowledge and counsels other public men would not have thought worth seeking. Sumner believed it to be the statesman's part to lead the people, and not merely to follow them. He recognized, indeed, that measures and policies, in order to prevail, must have the support of public opinion; but he did not in advance study the drifts and currents of that opinion. He trusted the instincts of the people, and believed that what was
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...