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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4. Search the whole document.

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reakfast hour—the time when his intimate friends most sought him—recall the zest with which he opened and read letter after letter (now and then handing one to the visitor) from his miscellaneous correspondents,—Cobden, Bright, and the Duchess of Argyll; a dozen or twenty faithful friends who wrote of affairs in Massachusetts; old Abolitionists in all parts of the country, well known or obscure,—indeed, from thousands of all conditions who had thoughts and anxieties which they wished some one in of any public value. Bright and Cobden, almost our only two friends of eminence in England, reported to him drifts of opinion important to be known by our government, and gave sincere counsels as to what it was best for us to do. The Duchess of Argyll, reflecting the views of the duke, then in the Cabinet, did the same. These letters as soon as received were read to the President and his advisers, and were most useful in guiding their action. To these three correspondents he wrote often an
George Sumner (search for this): chapter 3
6: qualities and habits as a senator.—1862. Sumner was from the beginning of his career in the Sey unusual, by the way. and the same tribute is Sumner's due. No private errand and no listlessness kufficient number to make its action decisive. Sumner's vacant chair, while he was in health, was ne868, Congressional Globe, p. 2494) referred to Sumner's constant votes against adjournments until afpril 7 and 8, 1869 (Globe, pp. 384, 607, 609). Sumner's superlative fidelity may be thought finical,nor. It would have been well, I think, if Sumner had held some important executive or administrs encounter in trying to have his own way. Sumner had comprehensive intelligence, which always sc men would not have thought worth seeking. Sumner believed it to be the statesman's part to leadting serenely for the sober second thought. Sumner's sense of moral rectitude was supreme in the Thies sent an account); the disability of George Sumner, stricken with paralysis, and after medica[10 more...]
Saturday Seward (search for this): chapter 3
as a limitation to his sphere that he did not draw many statutes. General Butler's Book, p. 314; G. S. Boutwell in the Boston Globe, Sept. 28, 1890. This mechanical work falls largely to the solicitors of the departments, or to promoters of bills; The bankrupt bill, which has long engaged the attention of Congress, was drawn by an eminent judge,—John Lowell, of Boston. and Sumner did as much of it as most men holding his relation to general affairs,—as much, for instance, as Webster or Seward. Wilson probably did not, while chairman of the committee on military affairs during the Civil War, draw one of the bills reported by him,—all being supplied by the Secretary of War, whose proper business it is to adjust the details of the military system. The mass of senators and representatives at that time were accustomed to leave Washington immediately after the adjournment. The custom has been somewhat modified by the greater number of members who have become renters or proprieto<
Theodore S. Fay (search for this): chapter 3
he files of letters received by him show, bore his full share of this burden. He and his colleague were the medium of communication between Governor Andrew and the government. The files of the governor's office at the State House contain many letters from Sumner on public business. Literary men as well as antislavery men, irrespective of the States they lived in, felt they had a special claim on Sumner. Motley was urgent with him for a mission, first at the Hague and then at Vienna. Fay hoped, though vainly, to be saved by him from the competition of place-seekers. Bayard Taylor, wishing to succeed Cameron at St. Petersburg, wrote from that capital, Aug. 18, 1862: Take my importunity in good part; there are so few senators who are scholars! It was a time when relatives were always at Washington on their way to look for wounded or sick soldiers, or to recover their bodies from fields and hospitals. Sumner, however much it might invade his time, was always glad to serve t
Justin S. Morrill (search for this): chapter 3
idence of men, all united to put him in the front and to keep him there. His associates in the Senate, when his presence no longer imposed reserve, testified to the power of his personality. Eulogies in Congress, April 27, 1874. Congressional Globe, pp. 3399-3406, 3409-3419. On the day when they summed up his relations to the body in which he had long served, they recalled his manly beauty and manly strength, G. F. Hoar. his imposing presence on the outer circle of the Senate, J. S. Morrill. and the grand intonations of his far-sounding voice. 0. D. Conger. One said: He was a man of such mark in his mere exterior as to arrest at once the attention of a stranger and make him a chief among ten thousand. D. D. Pratt. Another said: You will remember his commanding presence, his stalwart frame (six feet and four inches in height), the vigor and grace of his motions, the charm of his manners, the polish of his rhetoric, the abundance of his learning, the fervor and impressi
W. S. Robinson (search for this): chapter 3
r in the Senate or House of Representatives, it has not been my good fortune to know one who has been as prompt and kindly attentive to the applications of his constituents as yourself. One great secret of his power, as was remarked by a shrewd critic of public men, was his intense personality, his great and overmastering qualities, which brought him at times into collision with other senators, but which nevertheless made him one of the powers and estates of the country. Warrington's (W. S. Robinson) Pen Portraits, pp. 517-520. This writer said: It would be difficult to name a man,—and this is the universal testimony of those who have been to Washington on business, and have asked Mr. Sumner's aid,—it would be difficult, if not impossible, to find a man so industrious, methodical, thorough, energetic, and successful in attending to pure matters of business. This is the simple fact, and no exaggeration whatever. His great practical talent excels that of almost every man we have eve
E. Rockwood Hoar (search for this): chapter 3
rm of his manners, the polish of his rhetoric, the abundance of his learning, the fervor and impressiveness of his oratory. He was every inch a senator, and upheld with zeal and fidelity the dignity, privileges, and authority of the Senate. E. R. Hoar. Edward Dicey, who visited the United States at this period, described the senator as that great, sturdy, English-looking figure, with the broad, massive forehead, over which the rich mass of nut-brown hair, streaked here and there with a line so unhappy as when obliged to stay in his seat. Sumner's uniform observance of rules and courtesies in the Senate was referred to in tributes in Congress, April 27, 1874, by Pratt of Indiana in the Senate (Congressional Globe, p. 3403), and by E. R. Hoar in the House (Globe, p. 3410). He was accustomed to make protests against scandalous conduct in the Senate,—as Abbott's threat of a duel with a senator, and the drunkenness of Senator Saulsbury and Vice-President Johnson. he listened with respe
Cornelius C. Felton (search for this): chapter 3
w of the senator, and he came to be his cordial and confidential friend, so remaining to the end. He dispensed a liberal hospitality; and in his house at Washington, as well as at Boston and on the seashore, Sumner was always welcome to lodge or dine. The intimacy which he had enjoyed with the family of Mr. Adams, already Minister to England, was now transferred to Mr. Hooper's, at whose house he dined at least once or twice a week from 1861 to 1874. Later in these pages it will become necessary to refer to a near connection between the two friends. Two or three incidents in family and friendship may be noted here,—the death in March, 1862, of another of the Five of Clubs (Felton, of whose funeral Mr. Thies sent an account); the disability of George Sumner, stricken with paralysis, and after medical treatment in Northampton coming back to the old home in Hancock Street; a cordial letter from Agassiz in the autumn urging attendance at the dinners of the Saturday Club at Parker's
Henry Wilson (search for this): chapter 3
escended to frivolity; he did not, as is the habit of restless members, keep passing from seat to seat, indulging in small talk with one or another, but remained mostly in his own; Douglas's swagger up and down the aisles is still remembered. Wilson was never so unhappy as when obliged to stay in his seat. Sumner's uniform observance of rules and courtesies in the Senate was referred to in tributes in Congress, April 27, 1874, by Pratt of Indiana in the Senate (Congressional Globe, p. 3403)ankrupt bill, which has long engaged the attention of Congress, was drawn by an eminent judge,—John Lowell, of Boston. and Sumner did as much of it as most men holding his relation to general affairs,—as much, for instance, as Webster or Seward. Wilson probably did not, while chairman of the committee on military affairs during the Civil War, draw one of the bills reported by him,—all being supplied by the Secretary of War, whose proper business it is to adjust the details of the military syste<
John Bigelow (search for this): chapter 3
personation and ideal of a leader in what has been regarded, in view of its constitution and functions, as a parliamentary body second to none in the world. John Bigelow, already referred to, a writer and public man distinguished for critical observation of men and affairs, wrote in his journal on shipboard, in February, 1861, on of the country, in itself a service which those who feel the important role the Senate ought to play in our constitutional system know how to appreciate. Mr. Bigelow added in 1886 the following memorandum to complete what he had said twenty-five years before:— Though a man of strong feeling, Mr. Sumner was distinguishear as it was regarded at their posts, and advice as to modes of enlisting foreign opinion in our favor. Among correspondents of this class at this time were John Bigelow, Henry Adams, J. E. Harvey, W. S. Thayer, Seth Webb, Jr., J. S. Pike, B. Taylor, J. R. Giddings, T. Corwin. Carl Schurz. II. J. Perry, C. D. Cleveland, and B
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