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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4. Search the whole document.

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John Lothrop Motley (search for this): chapter 3
obtain access to them except through senators and representatives. Sumner, as the files of letters received by him show, bore his full share of this burden. He and his colleague were the medium of communication between Governor Andrew and the government. The files of the governor's office at the State House contain many letters from Sumner on public business. Literary men as well as antislavery men, irrespective of the States they lived in, felt they had a special claim on Sumner. Motley was urgent with him for a mission, first at the Hague and then at Vienna. Fay hoped, though vainly, to be saved by him from the competition of place-seekers. Bayard Taylor, wishing to succeed Cameron at St. Petersburg, wrote from that capital, Aug. 18, 1862: Take my importunity in good part; there are so few senators who are scholars! It was a time when relatives were always at Washington on their way to look for wounded or sick soldiers, or to recover their bodies from fields and hospi
Joel Parker (search for this): chapter 3
w of the senator, and he came to be his cordial and confidential friend, so remaining to the end. He dispensed a liberal hospitality; and in his house at Washington, as well as at Boston and on the seashore, Sumner was always welcome to lodge or dine. The intimacy which he had enjoyed with the family of Mr. Adams, already Minister to England, was now transferred to Mr. Hooper's, at whose house he dined at least once or twice a week from 1861 to 1874. Later in these pages it will become necessary to refer to a near connection between the two friends. Two or three incidents in family and friendship may be noted here,—the death in March, 1862, of another of the Five of Clubs (Felton, of whose funeral Mr. Thies sent an account); the disability of George Sumner, stricken with paralysis, and after medical treatment in Northampton coming back to the old home in Hancock Street; a cordial letter from Agassiz in the autumn urging attendance at the dinners of the Saturday Club at Parker's
W. A. Hovey (search for this): chapter 3
who visited Washington to look after his interest in a pending bill, could, after he had shown the justice of his case and obtained the senator's promise of attention to it, go home with entire confidence that the promise would be kept with no further reminder, even though the matter might not in the course of business be reached for months. He carried earnestness and will into all he did, and succeeded where others of less heart and force failed. A manager of the sanitary commission W. A. Hovey, of Boston. relates how, arrested by red tape at the war department, he sought in his despair the senator, who overcame all obstacles in an hour, and saw delivered to the manager the needed pass for the relief steamer up the Potomac. It came about from his fidelity and the general confidence in his efficiency that the people of his State confided to him their interests in pending legislation, or in business with the departments, rather than to others who had passed their lives in profess
John W. Forney (search for this): chapter 3
ot denying to many of their contemporaries a certain measure of these noble qualities, their fullest development must be found in our time in two kindred characters,— John Bright and Charles Sumner. See estimates in W. H. Channing's Life, by O. B. Frothingham, p. 367; Pall Mall Gazette, Dec. 26, 1866; Harper's Weekly, March 24, 1866; New York Herald, Dec 28, 1871, containing an article, in the characteristic style of that journal, from a correspondent who mingles praise and dispraise. J. W. Forney wrote of Sumner (Anecdotes of public Men, vol. II. p. 262): We are all human; the best, like the worst, are controlled more or less by personal motives. But Sumner, I insist, was the supreme exception to this rule. I never knew any man less moved by selfish instincts. True, he had a lofty self-consciousness, or self-assertion; he liked to speak of his achievements, and he had the precision and the positiveness of a close reader and thinker. But he was not a self-seeker. He never int
ers not bound to him by personal relations. It was often given in his lifetime, and more freely when death had set the seal on his career. Not denying to many of their contemporaries a certain measure of these noble qualities, their fullest development must be found in our time in two kindred characters,— John Bright and Charles Sumner. See estimates in W. H. Channing's Life, by O. B. Frothingham, p. 367; Pall Mall Gazette, Dec. 26, 1866; Harper's Weekly, March 24, 1866; New York Herald, Dec 28, 1871, containing an article, in the characteristic style of that journal, from a correspondent who mingles praise and dispraise. J. W. Forney wrote of Sumner (Anecdotes of public Men, vol. II. p. 262): We are all human; the best, like the worst, are controlled more or less by personal motives. But Sumner, I insist, was the supreme exception to this rule. I never knew any man less moved by selfish instincts. True, he had a lofty self-consciousness, or self-assertion; he liked to speak
Bayard Taylor (search for this): chapter 3
War as it was regarded at their posts, and advice as to modes of enlisting foreign opinion in our favor. Among correspondents of this class at this time were John Bigelow, Henry Adams, J. E. Harvey, W. S. Thayer, Seth Webb, Jr., J. S. Pike, B. Taylor, J. R. Giddings, T. Corwin. Carl Schurz. II. J. Perry, C. D. Cleveland, and B. R. Wood. No one outside of the state department had at command equal sources of information of this kind. He was the one senator to whom advanced antislavery metive of the States they lived in, felt they had a special claim on Sumner. Motley was urgent with him for a mission, first at the Hague and then at Vienna. Fay hoped, though vainly, to be saved by him from the competition of place-seekers. Bayard Taylor, wishing to succeed Cameron at St. Petersburg, wrote from that capital, Aug. 18, 1862: Take my importunity in good part; there are so few senators who are scholars! It was a time when relatives were always at Washington on their way to loo
Samuel Hooper (search for this): chapter 3
late M. V. B. such as he wished to be associated with. Somebody in the play says in anger to his son: I'll unget you! Don't do this. Simply unname him. Samuel Hooper entered, in December, 1861, the House as a member from a Boston district, and continued a member during the rest of the senator's life. He was a wealthy merchnd sympathies hitherto had been those of the capitalists, who as a class had not looked with favor on Sumner. Daily intercourse, as was often the case, changed Mr. Hooper's view of the senator, and he came to be his cordial and confidential friend, so remaining to the end. He dispensed a liberal hospitality; and in his house at mner was always welcome to lodge or dine. The intimacy which he had enjoyed with the family of Mr. Adams, already Minister to England, was now transferred to Mr. Hooper's, at whose house he dined at least once or twice a week from 1861 to 1874. Later in these pages it will become necessary to refer to a near connection between
Arthur B. Fuller (search for this): chapter 3
holars! It was a time when relatives were always at Washington on their way to look for wounded or sick soldiers, or to recover their bodies from fields and hospitals. Sumner, however much it might invade his time, was always glad to serve them by procuring passes or otherwise. When any of his friends met with bereavements, his habit was to send a letter of solace. The files of his correspondence contain many replies from those whose griefs he sought to assuage. The brother of Rev. Arthur B. Fuller, killed at Fredericksburg, whose widow's petition for a pension he promoted, wrote to him: As often as my brother's widow receives her pension for herself and little ones, she will think of the senator from Massachusetts. Sumner's admirers often named their children for him. His replies to them, when they announced this kind of recognition, were of uniform tenor, and one written in 1865 may be given as a specimen:— Don't make a mistake. Never name a child after a living man
James S. Pike (search for this): chapter 3
pleaded that the secret service fund should be used to instruct foreign journals. He was likewise in communication with a large proportion of the legations and consulates of the United States, from which came statements of their needs and the aspect of our Civil War as it was regarded at their posts, and advice as to modes of enlisting foreign opinion in our favor. Among correspondents of this class at this time were John Bigelow, Henry Adams, J. E. Harvey, W. S. Thayer, Seth Webb, Jr., J. S. Pike, B. Taylor, J. R. Giddings, T. Corwin. Carl Schurz. II. J. Perry, C. D. Cleveland, and B. R. Wood. No one outside of the state department had at command equal sources of information of this kind. He was the one senator to whom advanced antislavery men looked for the expression and promotion of their views; and every mail at this time, and indeed during his entire service in Congress, brought him a large number of letters from this class, in which they stated, often at great length, th
Samuel G. Howe (search for this): chapter 3
, and yet give so much time to miscellaneous visitors, was something of a mystery. It was, however, his midnight vigils which brought up the arrears. The newspaper men were generally very friendly to him. He held tightly the secrets of the Senate notwithstanding he had no respect for the system of closed doors; but as far as consistent with a senator's oath, he talked freely and instructively to all who came to him. After he had a house of his own, which was not till 1867, he explained to Dr. Howe a contre-temps by which a well-known scholar whom he had wished to see had been refused admission, and added:— I am impatient and nervous, weary, fatigued, and unhappy, beginning the day weary and ending it weary. From the time I take my seat at the breakfast table interruptions begin; and such is the succession of visitors that during this vacation I have been detained daily at the table where I breakfasted till three o'clock P. M., without an opportunity of putting pen to paper or
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