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Josiah G. Abbott (search for this): chapter 3
ne or another, but remained mostly in his own; Douglas's swagger up and down the aisles is still remembered. Wilson was never so unhappy as when obliged to stay in his seat. Sumner's uniform observance of rules and courtesies in the Senate was referred to in tributes in Congress, April 27, 1874, by Pratt of Indiana in the Senate (Congressional Globe, p. 3403), and by E. R. Hoar in the House (Globe, p. 3410). He was accustomed to make protests against scandalous conduct in the Senate,—as Abbott's threat of a duel with a senator, and the drunkenness of Senator Saulsbury and Vice-President Johnson. he listened with respect to what his associates said in debate; Thurman said of him in his tribute, April 27, 1874 (Congressional Globe, p. 3400), He spoke often and elaborately himself; and he was the best, and perhaps the most courteous, listener among us to the speeches of others. his manners were uniformly decorous, as opponents in the worst of times admitted; and the stranger in th
D. Conger (search for this): chapter 3
His associates in the Senate, when his presence no longer imposed reserve, testified to the power of his personality. Eulogies in Congress, April 27, 1874. Congressional Globe, pp. 3399-3406, 3409-3419. On the day when they summed up his relations to the body in which he had long served, they recalled his manly beauty and manly strength, G. F. Hoar. his imposing presence on the outer circle of the Senate, J. S. Morrill. and the grand intonations of his far-sounding voice. 0. D. Conger. One said: He was a man of such mark in his mere exterior as to arrest at once the attention of a stranger and make him a chief among ten thousand. D. D. Pratt. Another said: You will remember his commanding presence, his stalwart frame (six feet and four inches in height), the vigor and grace of his motions, the charm of his manners, the polish of his rhetoric, the abundance of his learning, the fervor and impressiveness of his oratory. He was every inch a senator, and upheld with zea
Allen G. Thurman (search for this): chapter 3
Sumner's uniform observance of rules and courtesies in the Senate was referred to in tributes in Congress, April 27, 1874, by Pratt of Indiana in the Senate (Congressional Globe, p. 3403), and by E. R. Hoar in the House (Globe, p. 3410). He was accustomed to make protests against scandalous conduct in the Senate,—as Abbott's threat of a duel with a senator, and the drunkenness of Senator Saulsbury and Vice-President Johnson. he listened with respect to what his associates said in debate; Thurman said of him in his tribute, April 27, 1874 (Congressional Globe, p. 3400), He spoke often and elaborately himself; and he was the best, and perhaps the most courteous, listener among us to the speeches of others. his manners were uniformly decorous, as opponents in the worst of times admitted; and the stranger in the gallery looking down on the scene recognized in him the impersonation and ideal of a leader in what has been regarded, in view of its constitution and functions, as a parliamen
William S. Thayer (search for this): chapter 3
War on foreign opinion, and pleaded that the secret service fund should be used to instruct foreign journals. He was likewise in communication with a large proportion of the legations and consulates of the United States, from which came statements of their needs and the aspect of our Civil War as it was regarded at their posts, and advice as to modes of enlisting foreign opinion in our favor. Among correspondents of this class at this time were John Bigelow, Henry Adams, J. E. Harvey, W. S. Thayer, Seth Webb, Jr., J. S. Pike, B. Taylor, J. R. Giddings, T. Corwin. Carl Schurz. II. J. Perry, C. D. Cleveland, and B. R. Wood. No one outside of the state department had at command equal sources of information of this kind. He was the one senator to whom advanced antislavery men looked for the expression and promotion of their views; and every mail at this time, and indeed during his entire service in Congress, brought him a large number of letters from this class, in which they stat
George F. Hoar (search for this): chapter 3
non flecti. Person, fame, suffering, accomplishments, character, the confidence of men, all united to put him in the front and to keep him there. His associates in the Senate, when his presence no longer imposed reserve, testified to the power of his personality. Eulogies in Congress, April 27, 1874. Congressional Globe, pp. 3399-3406, 3409-3419. On the day when they summed up his relations to the body in which he had long served, they recalled his manly beauty and manly strength, G. F. Hoar. his imposing presence on the outer circle of the Senate, J. S. Morrill. and the grand intonations of his far-sounding voice. 0. D. Conger. One said: He was a man of such mark in his mere exterior as to arrest at once the attention of a stranger and make him a chief among ten thousand. D. D. Pratt. Another said: You will remember his commanding presence, his stalwart frame (six feet and four inches in height), the vigor and grace of his motions, the charm of his manners, the polis
ign journals. He was likewise in communication with a large proportion of the legations and consulates of the United States, from which came statements of their needs and the aspect of our Civil War as it was regarded at their posts, and advice as to modes of enlisting foreign opinion in our favor. Among correspondents of this class at this time were John Bigelow, Henry Adams, J. E. Harvey, W. S. Thayer, Seth Webb, Jr., J. S. Pike, B. Taylor, J. R. Giddings, T. Corwin. Carl Schurz. II. J. Perry, C. D. Cleveland, and B. R. Wood. No one outside of the state department had at command equal sources of information of this kind. He was the one senator to whom advanced antislavery men looked for the expression and promotion of their views; and every mail at this time, and indeed during his entire service in Congress, brought him a large number of letters from this class, in which they stated, often at great length, their hopes and fears, and their interest in the various measures conc
Andrew Johnson (search for this): chapter 3
till remembered. Wilson was never so unhappy as when obliged to stay in his seat. Sumner's uniform observance of rules and courtesies in the Senate was referred to in tributes in Congress, April 27, 1874, by Pratt of Indiana in the Senate (Congressional Globe, p. 3403), and by E. R. Hoar in the House (Globe, p. 3410). He was accustomed to make protests against scandalous conduct in the Senate,—as Abbott's threat of a duel with a senator, and the drunkenness of Senator Saulsbury and Vice-President Johnson. he listened with respect to what his associates said in debate; Thurman said of him in his tribute, April 27, 1874 (Congressional Globe, p. 3400), He spoke often and elaborately himself; and he was the best, and perhaps the most courteous, listener among us to the speeches of others. his manners were uniformly decorous, as opponents in the worst of times admitted; and the stranger in the gallery looking down on the scene recognized in him the impersonation and ideal of a leader i
Joshua R. Giddings (search for this): chapter 3
ervice fund should be used to instruct foreign journals. He was likewise in communication with a large proportion of the legations and consulates of the United States, from which came statements of their needs and the aspect of our Civil War as it was regarded at their posts, and advice as to modes of enlisting foreign opinion in our favor. Among correspondents of this class at this time were John Bigelow, Henry Adams, J. E. Harvey, W. S. Thayer, Seth Webb, Jr., J. S. Pike, B. Taylor, J. R. Giddings, T. Corwin. Carl Schurz. II. J. Perry, C. D. Cleveland, and B. R. Wood. No one outside of the state department had at command equal sources of information of this kind. He was the one senator to whom advanced antislavery men looked for the expression and promotion of their views; and every mail at this time, and indeed during his entire service in Congress, brought him a large number of letters from this class, in which they stated, often at great length, their hopes and fears, and
Richard Cobden (search for this): chapter 3
and then handing one to the visitor) from his miscellaneous correspondents,—Cobden, Bright, and the Duchess of Argyll; a dozen or twenty faithful friends who wrote of affairs in Massachusetts; old Abolitionists in all parts of the country, well known or obscure,—indeed, from thousands of all conditions who had thoughts and anxieties which they wished some one in Washington to share. He was the only public man in Washington who had a European correspondence of any public value. Bright and Cobden, almost our only two friends of eminence in England, reported to him drifts of opinion important to be known by our government, and gave sincere counsels as to what it was best for us to do. The Duchess of Argyll, reflecting the views of the duke, then in the Cabinet, did the same. These letters as soon as received were read to the President and his advisers, and were most useful in guiding their action. To these three correspondents he wrote often and most earnestly,—maintaining, spite o<
C. D. Cleveland (search for this): chapter 3
He was likewise in communication with a large proportion of the legations and consulates of the United States, from which came statements of their needs and the aspect of our Civil War as it was regarded at their posts, and advice as to modes of enlisting foreign opinion in our favor. Among correspondents of this class at this time were John Bigelow, Henry Adams, J. E. Harvey, W. S. Thayer, Seth Webb, Jr., J. S. Pike, B. Taylor, J. R. Giddings, T. Corwin. Carl Schurz. II. J. Perry, C. D. Cleveland, and B. R. Wood. No one outside of the state department had at command equal sources of information of this kind. He was the one senator to whom advanced antislavery men looked for the expression and promotion of their views; and every mail at this time, and indeed during his entire service in Congress, brought him a large number of letters from this class, in which they stated, often at great length, their hopes and fears, and their interest in the various measures concerning slaver
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