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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1. Search the whole document.

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East Chickamauga Creek (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
d by intervals of nearly twenty miles; the extreme right of Rosecrans was forty miles from the left of his army, with almost impenetrable mountains between. While in this position, he was threatened by Bragg, but got his forces together at Chickamauga creek by the 19th of September, although with infinite difficulty. Here Bragg attacked, and after two days fighting, succeeded in piercing the national centre, and demolishing the right wing of the army. Rosecrans himself hurried to Chattanoogae out in company with Grant, Thomas, and other officers, to the hills on the north bank of the Tennessee, from which could be seen the camps of the enemy compassing Chattanooga, and the line of Missionary ridge, with its eastern terminus on Chickamauga creek, the point which Sherman was expected to take, and hold, and fortify. A mighty amphitheatre, where the actors were nearly ready to assume their parts, with distant mountains for spectators, while cloud-capped hills, and valleys shrouded in
Lookout Valley (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ival at Chattanooga Thomas's magnanimity Lookout valley Brown's ferry plan of operations to recover Lookout valley seizure of Brown's ferry March of Hooker from Bridgeport battle of Wauhatchie out mountain, then crosses the entrance to Lookout valley, and turns south and west towards Stevensoterrupt the communications of the enemy up Lookout valley, as well as give complete command of the Klley. As the rebels held the north end of Lookout valley with a brigade of troops, as well as the rzure of the range of hills at the mouth of Lookout valley, and covering the Brown's ferry road, was ould be secured to reenforce the troops in Lookout valley, than was afforded to the rebels by the nao seize the range of hills at the mouth of Lookout valley, covering the Kelly's ferry road. In thund the base of the mountain. The fate of Lookout valley was decided. The force which had starte but I will endeavor to make an advance up Lookout valley, and threaten the enemy from here, in fron[5 more...]
Kingston (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
h corps was returned to him by Grant, Burnside had taken the field, moving by three roads, upon Kingston and Knoxville. On the 2d of September, he seized Knoxville, a hundred and ten miles from Chattrmy is moving towards you. Again, on the 1st of November: Should the enemy break through below Kingston, move in force to Sparta and McMinnville, and hang on to him with all your force, and such as Ifar east as Bull's gap, and, south of that, he picketed the Tennessee river, from Washington to Kingston. His main force was stationed between Kingston and Knoxville, and all the country south of theKingston and Knoxville, and all the country south of the Holston was occupied. The command, said Burnside, is in good health and spirits; very short of clothing, and on quarter rations of every thing but meat and bread. By running the mills in our possesital importance that East Tennessee should be held. Take immediate steps to that end. Evacuate Kingston, if you think best. As I said in a previous dispatch, I think seven days more will enable us t
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
and the institution which was the origin and cause of the rebellion had never flourished among these beetling cliffs, nor in the rugged valleys that lay between. The masses all through East Tennessee and West Virginia, in the western part of North Carolina, and the northern portions of Georgia and Alabama, were never false to the Union. They were hunted by rebel mobs and proscribed by rebel authorities, were persecuted and driven to caves, imprisoned, starved, tortured, put to death, but remaisting as Nashville may be to the Louisville interests, it strikes me that its possession is of very secondary importance, in comparison with the immense results that would arise from the adherence to our cause of the masses in East Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, northern Georgia and Alabama—results that I feel assured would ere long follow from the movement alluded to. No positive movement, however, was made in this direction, until after the evacuation of Corinth, in May, 1862, w
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
noxville. On the 2d of September, he seized Knoxville, a hundred and ten miles from Chattanooga, w he telegraphed to Burnside, who was then at Knoxville: Have you tools for fortifying? Important pvegetables to Chattanooga, and ammunition to Knoxville, securing gunboats to protect Sherman, and dis military division reached from Natchez to Knoxville, more than a thousand miles, and included twach him, long before assistance could get to Knoxville from Grant's army; indeed, there was no way . . . . . If Burnside can hold the line from Knoxville to Clinton, as I have asked him, for six dayain force was stationed between Kingston and Knoxville, and all the country south of the Holston wa whereas, if we concentrate near this place (Knoxville), not only the present force of the enemy, b Longstreet between the Little Tennessee and Knoxville, he should not be allowed to escape with an ten P. M. yesterday. Troops had got back to Knoxville. Sherman's advance reached Lookout mountain[4 more...]
McMinnville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
can support each other. It is better that you should be forced from the eastern end of the valley than from the west. Thomas is in no condition to move from his present position. On the 31st, three days before the movement was suggested to Longstreet, Grant informed Burnside: It is reported, on the authority of a Union man, that a large force of Bragg's army is moving towards you. Again, on the 1st of November: Should the enemy break through below Kingston, move in force to Sparta and McMinnville, and hang on to him with all your force, and such as I can send you from Bridgeport and Stevenson, until he is beaten and turned back. On the 5th, Longstreet's movement having actually begun the day before, Grant said to Burnside: I will endeavor, from here, to bring the enemy back from your right flank as soon as possible. Should you discover him leaving, you should annoy him all you can with your cavalry, and in fact with all the troops you can bring to bear. Sherman's advance will b
Gulf of Mexico (search for this): chapter 12
was an immense bastion at the centre of Grant's line, flanked on one side by the Tennessee valley, and on the other by the mountains of northern Georgia and Alabama. In its front, but a hundred and fifty miles south, lay Atlanta, at the junction of as many important railroads as Chattanooga; and, covered by Atlanta, were Selma, with its arsenals, Montgomery, with its great stores of cotton, Macon, Mobile, and all the rich central valley that extends from the Cumberland mountains to the Gulf of Mexico. On the 23d of September, immediately after the defeat of Rosecrans, Halleck detached the Eleventh and Twelfth corps from the Army of the Potomac, and sent them by rail, under command of Major-General Hooker, to protect Rosecrans's railroad line of communication between Bridgeport and Nashville. These troops, however, were not ordered further than Bridgeport, as their presence at Chattanooga would only have increased the embarrassment of those who could not themselves be fully suppli
Murfreesboro (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
els of course brought back to Bragg the troops that they were no longer able to use in front of Grant. The fact of these movements was shown conclusively at the time, by the reports of prisoners, as well as by scouts and spies from the various national armies. They were good strategists. Having fewer forces and resources than the govern. ment, they earlier learned to husband and concentrate the means which were at their command. On the 24th of June, Rosecrans finally started from Murfreesboro, with about seventy thousand effective men; Rosecrans's strength when he started for Chickamauga was probably seventy thousand men; but he was obliged to leave garrisons at the various towns he took, as well as to guard the railroads as he advanced. This speedily reduced his moving column. Bragg was still in his front with an inferior force, and retreated before him. Rosecrans crossed the Tennessee at Stevenson, and marched south among the mountains, threatening to isolate Bragg, who
Chattanooga Valley (United States) (search for this): chapter 12
an open road to Chattanooga, when his forces should arrive in Lookout valley. As the rebels held the north end of Lookout valley with a brigade of troops, as well as the road leading around the foot of the mountain from their main camp in Chattanooga valley, they would have had but little difficulty in concentrating a sufficient force to defeat Hooker and drive him back. To prevent this, the seizure of the range of hills at the mouth of Lookout valley, and covering the Brown's ferry road, wasif a battle became inevitable. Positions were taken, from which the troops could not have been driven except by vastly superior forces; and artillery was placed to command the roads leading, around Lookout mountain, to the enemy's camps in Chattanooga valley. On the morning of the 26th, Hooker crossed the Tennessee, by the pontoon bridge at Bridgeport, with the greater part of the Eleventh corps, under Major-General Howard, and a portion of the Twelfth corps, under Brigadier-General Geary.
Athens, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
East Tennessee, and cooperate in the strategy which should direct the Army of the Cumberland, Sherman was marching across the continent, four hundred miles, from the Mississippi valley. He started from Vicksburg on the 27th of September, and arrived at Memphis on the 2d of October. It was then his duty to conduct the Fifteenth army corps, and such other troops as could be spared from Hurlbut's command, to the support of Rosecrans, marching by way of Corinth, Tuscumbia, and Decatur, to Athens, Alabama. During this long and tedious march, he was to look to Rosecrans for no supplies, and was, therefore, obliged to repair the railroad from Memphis east, as he advanced: so Halleck had ordered. But, when Grant assumed command of the military division, he at once ordered supplies from St. Louis to meet Sherman at Eastport, on the Tennessee. These were sent up the river on transports, Grant requesting Admiral Porter to convoy the steamers which conveyed them. During all these campaign
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