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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1. Search the whole document.

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Decatur (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ival great anxiety about Burnside road from Nashville to Decatur opened supplies ordered to Burnside by Cumberland river t of Rosecrans, marching by way of Corinth, Tuscumbia, and Decatur, to Athens, Alabama. During this long and tedious march, ad already given orders to open the road from Nashville to Decatur, and soothed the fears of his chief by informing him: A poion of Sherman's command will remain on the Nashville and Decatur road, till that is finished. With two roads from Nashvillnd, on the 4th, Grant declared: The road from Nashville to Decatur will have to be put in running order. Sherman was orderediven directions for putting the railroad from Nashville to Decatur in running order. That road is now only guarded to Columbd take place, and said to Burnside: With the Nashville and Decatur road built, and full possession of the river, you can be s is of vast importance that the railroad from Nashville to Decatur should be opened as soon as possible. Make contracts with
Whiteside, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ngly: Burnside certainly can detain Longstreet in the Tennessee valley, until we can make such moves, here, as will entirely free him from present dangers. I have asked him if he could hold the Knoxville and Clinton line for one week; if so, we can make moves here, that will save all danger in East Tennessee. Sherman is now at Bridgeport. He will commence moving to-morrow or next day. Sherman is now at Bridgeport. He will commence moving tomorrow or next day, throwing one brigade from Whiteside into Trenton, thus threatening the enemy's left flank. The remainder of his force will pass over by Kelly's ferry evading view from Lookout, and march up to the mouth of Chickamauga. Pontoons are made and making, to throw across at that point, over which it is intended that Sherman's force, and one division of Thomas's, shall pass. This force will attack Missionary ridge, with the left flank of Thomas supporting, from here. In the mean time, Hooker will attack Lookout, and carry it if
Newsome Springs (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
rsville, Mississippi, a heavy attack was made on the body of troops with which Sherman himself was moving. This, however, was repulsed; a bridge was built over Bear creek, and at Tuscumbia, whither Sherman sent Blair's division in advance, still another rebel force was dispersed. Skirmishing continued all along the route, but, athem to strengthen divisions already at the front. On the 24th, the day after he arrived at Chattanooga, Grant telegraphed to Sherman: Drop every thing east of Bear creek, and move with your entire force towards Stevenson, until you receive further orders. The enemy are evidently moving a large force towards Cleveland, and may lied: I have sent orders to Sherman to move east towards Stevenson, leaving every thing unguarded, except by the cavalry of the Army of the Cumberland, east of Bear creek. The possibility of the enemy's breaking through our lines east of this, and present inability to follow him from here, if he should, is the cause of this.
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ssionary ridge, and, when that is carried, to threaten or attack the enemy's line of communications between Cleveland and Dalton. This movement will be made by Monday morning. I expect Sherman will reach Huntsville to-day. Cleveland and Dalton are Dalton are on the railroad between Tennessee and Georgia. As early as the 26th of October, three days after his arrival at the front, Grant had foreseen the chance of such a movement as the enemy had now undertaken, and telegraphed to Burnside: Do you hear gainst it; and, when that is carried, to threaten and even attack, if possible, the enemy's line of communication between Dalton and Cleveland. Rations should be ready to issue a sufficiency to last four days, the moment Missionary ridge is in our pdered an immediate move from here to carry Missionary ridge, and to threaten or attack the railroad between Cleveland and Dalton. This must have the effect to draw the enemy back from your western front. But Thomas announced that he had not horse
Moccasin Point (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
erry. A bend in the Tennessee, just below Chattanooga, shapes the northern shore into a singular peninsula, called Moccasin point, from its resemblance to an Indian moccasin. This point runs out immediately under Lookout mountain; and, at its narrowest part, about three miles below the mouth of Lookout creek, Brown's ferry is situated. Moccasin point was still in the hands of the national army, but the opposite bank, from Chattanooga creek to Kelly's ferry, was occupied by the rebels. A shmportance. By the use of pontoon bridges at Chattanooga and Brown's ferry, and of the north bank of the river across Moccasin point, a shorter line could be secured to reenforce the troops in Lookout valley, than was afforded to the rebels by the nawounded. The remainder of the troops and the material for a bridge were moved, by the north bank of the river, across Moccasin point to Brown's ferry, without attracting the attention of the enemy; and, before day dawned, the whole force was ferried
Missionary Ridge, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
e southern limit of the field is known as Missionary ridge, called so by the Indians, who allowed that some of the houses were left outside. Missionary ridge, immediately south and east of ChattanoogGrant's command, to assault the rebels on Missionary ridge. On the 28th, Grant said: If the rebels although this force started promptly from Missionary ridge, on the 4th of November, it was unable toy to be, an attack on the northern end of Missionary ridge, with all the force you can bring to bearsufficiency to last four days, the moment Missionary ridge is in our possession; rations to be carriered an immediate move from here to carry Missionary ridge, and to threaten or attack the railroad bas's, shall pass. This force will attack Missionary ridge, with the left flank of Thomas supportingy compassing Chattanooga, and the line of Missionary ridge, with its eastern terminus on Chickamaugathe river to attack their right flank and Missionary ridge. A battle or a falling back of the enemy[3 more...]
Jasper, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ere is but one road, and that circuitous and bad. The route was from Chattanooga to Anderson, from Anderson back again to Jasper, and from Jasper to Bridgeport. Thence the railroad was open to Nashville. To supply an army of forty thousand men by sJasper to Bridgeport. Thence the railroad was open to Nashville. To supply an army of forty thousand men by such a route, for any length of time, was an impossibility; and there seemed no other possible mode. Bragg's line now extended from the river above the town to the river again below, so that Chattanooga was practically invested. Securely seated onl lame and suffering, was carried in the arms of soldiers, over the spots unsafe or impossible to cross on horseback. At Jasper, there was a halt, and, from there, he telegraphed to Burnside, by way of Louisville and Lexington: Every effort should bh corps, in the Army of the Cumberland, was moved to a position opposite Chattanooga. From there, he was to march by the Jasper road, the only practicable route north of the Tennessee, to a point on the north bank, opposite Whitesides; then, to cros
Little Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ga. And over all these preparations, and all these armies, the spirit of one man was dominant. On the 14th of November, Halleck telegraphed Advices received from East Tennessee indicate that Burnside intends to abandon the defence of Little Tennessee river, and fall back before Longstreet, towards Cumberland gap and the upper valley. Longstreet is said to be near the Little Tennessee, with from twenty to forty thousand men; Burnside has about thirty thousand in all, and can hold his positiou the necessity of holding on to East Tennessee, in strong enough terms. Hold on to Knoxville, and that portion of the valley which you will necessarily possess, holding to that point. Should Longstreet move his whole force across the Little Tennessee river, an effort should be made to cut his pontoons on the stream, even if it sacrificed half the cavalry of the Ohio army. By holding on, and placing Longstreet between the Little Tennessee and Knoxville, he should not be allowed to escape wit
Maysville, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
nd direct him to secure transportation, and send one hundred thousand rations to-morrow morning. He watched over Sherman carefully, not only providing supplies to meet him along the route, and sending him ferry-boats with which to cross the Tennessee, and requesting Admiral Porter to order up gunboats to protect the crossing, but even studying and directing the routes by which he wished Sherman to march. On the 10th, he instructed that commander: I learn that, by the way of Newmarket and Maysville, you will avoid the heavy mountains, and find abundance of forage. If a part of your command is now at Winchester and a part back, that portion behind had better be turned on the Newmarket route. It was important indeed to him that Sherman should arrive in good condition, and as speedily as possible. He could not move Thomas, the wheels of whose cannon were heavy and held him fast; Burnside could not be relieved until Sherman came up; and the completion of the design which Grant had e
Cherokee, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
h by the Tennessee, begirt on every side with rugged peaks, and guarded on the west by a grim and almost perpendicular height, that rises directly from the water's edge more than two thousand feet. This point was once the boundary and the barrier of the Indian country. The southern limit of the field is known as Missionary ridge, called so by the Indians, who allowed the missionaries to pass no further; a gorge in the mountains, opening south, is still named Rossville gap, after the famous Cherokee chief, John Ross; while the lofty crest that looks out over the rugged valley was called Chattanooga—the Eagle's Nest. The whole region was a mighty bulwark, covering one of the most important avenues for access to the South, between the Mississippi and the Atlantic coast. Away, at the centre of the continent, these precipitous heights, this lonely valley, and this tortuous stream seemed the very spot where the eagles might build their nests, and the aborigines pitch their camps, secure
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