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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2. Search the whole document.

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Minnesota (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
r hundred thousand votes. No election of course was held in the ten Southern states in the possession of the enemy, and the vote of Tennessee was not counted, although given for Lincoln; but of the remaining twenty-five states, all but three,—New Jersey, Delaware, and Kentucky,—cast their votes for the Union. Fourteen states had authorized their soldiers in the field to vote. Those of New York sent their ballots home sealed, to be cast by their friends; the votes of the soldiers from Minnesota and of most of those from Vermont were not received by the canvassers in time to be counted; but the soldiers from the eleven remaining states gave a majority for Lincoln, of eighty-five thousand four hundred and sixty-one; Beyond all question, this majority would have been doubled, had all the soldiers been allowed to vote; but the marvel is that any man in arms against the rebellion could have opposed the re-election of Abraham Lincoln. a proportion of more than three to one. The s
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
s attempts to depreciate the currency and lower the financial credit of the country. There was at this time imminent danger of disturbance and outbreak at more than one point in the North. Many Northern cities were infested with rebel spies and refugees, as well as sympathizers; a positive conspiracy against the government was detected at the West, the ramifications of which extended into several states north of the Ohio; still another plot was discovered to release the rebel prisoners at Chicago, and burn the town; incendiarism was attempted at New York, and riot and insurrection were openly threatened on the day of the election, in the city where they had already occurred. See Appendix for documentary proof of these statements, from the files of the War Department. The gloom and apprehension which existed were wide-spread and profound, and were fully warranted. But though depressed and alarmed, the government and its friends were not dismayed. They were determined that in e
Mexico, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
have occurred to any experienced strategist. Supplies had already been ordered from Washington to the neighborhood of Savannah, but clothing for sixty thousand men as well as rations for thirty days, and forage for fifteen thousand horses for the same time, were now collected near Mobile bay, to await the possibility of Sherman's appearance there. At the same time, A. J. Smith had been ordered with ten thousand men, from Missouri to Tennessee. Transports on the Atlantic and in the Gulf of Mexico, steamers on the Missouri and the Mississippi, railways east and west of the Alleghanies—all were busy conveying forces and stores for the same object; the troops of Rosecrans, and Canby, and Foster, were all in motion, and their operations were all planned, to support the operations of Thomas and Sherman. Grant himself remained at City Point, closely watching every contingency, and holding Lee fast so that he could neither reinforce Hood nor intercept Sherman. On the 15th of November, h
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
my whole army united for the grand move into Georgia. On the 14th of October, when Sherman was re willing I should undertake to march across Georgia.—Sherman's Memoirs, Vol. II., page 156. Sherto the south-west, drawing me as a decoy from Georgia, which is his chief object. If he ventures nff. Davis's cherished plan of making me leave Georgia by manoeuvring. Thus far I have confined my ten days. If I were to let go Atlanta and North Georgia, and make for Hood, he would, as he did heg siege. I will destroy all the railroads of Georgia, and do as much substantial damage as is possplishing more, and before Thomas started from Georgia, the rebel cavalry had set out to return. Evomptly notified Thomas of the new campaign in Georgia. On the 1st of October, when he first proposrth corps, under Stanley, now on its way from Georgia, could arrive. On the 30th, the Twenty-thires, the most important of which now came from Georgia, since Sheridan had laid waste the Valley. [5 more...]
Kingston (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
n in Georgia. On the 1st of October, when he first proposed to ignore Hood and turn to the sea, he disclosed the idea to his principal subordinate. Then came the interruption occasioned by the rebel movement to the north; but on the 9th, Sherman reverted to the scheme in which Thomas was to play so important a part. I want to destroy all the road below Chattanooga, including Atlanta, and make for the sea-coast. In that event I would order back to Chattanooga everything the other side of Kingston. Thomas, however, disliked the project. On the 17th, he said, I hope you will adopt Grant's idea of turning Wilson loose, When Sherman originally proposed to move to the sea, leaving Hood in his rear, Grant, it will be remembered, at once declared that Hood should be first destroyed. It was then that he said: With Wilson turned loose with all your cavalry, you will find the rebels put much more on the defensive than hitherto. This is the only mention of Wilson's name in Grant's desp
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ame destination, and Wilson was sent back to Nashville with all dismounted detachments, and orderede to defend the railroad from Chattanooga to Nashville, and still have an army with which he could nstructed General Thomas to hold defensively Nashville, Chattanooga, and Decatur, all strongly fortf the strategy which enveloped a continent. Nashville, the capital of the state, is situated on the other extends south-westerly, to Decatur. Nashville is thus at the apex of a triangle, and was bmbia, Pulaski, and Athens. By either route, Nashville is about one hundred and fifty miles from thah, empties at last into the Ohio. Between Nashville and the Memphis and Charleston road the onlyld not hold, cut both the railroads south of Nashville, and seized some scattered stores. He had ntern terminus of a short railroad connecting Nashville with the Tennessee. This point was one of Toyed. At this juncture Schofield arrived at Nashville with the advance of the Twenty-third corps, [9 more...]
Burlington (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
st some of the ardor which characterized the assaults before Atlanta. If his strategy was still bold, his tactics were certainly tamer. He lingered around Florence when every hour's delay was of incalculable advantage to his adversary, and for twenty days, at this crisis of his fortune, he neither followed Sherman nor assaulted Schofield. On the 17th of November, as there were no indications of an immediate movement in any quarter of the field, Grant travelled from City Point to Burlington, New Jersey, where his children were at school. He took with him a single aide-de-camp, and a telegraph operator, that he might retain communication with the armies. On the 19th, a rumor came from Richmond that Early had been recalled from the Valley by Lee, and Grant sent word at once to City Point: Should such a thing occur, telegraph me, and I will get back as fast as steam can carry me. If it is true that Early is going back, it behooves General Meade to be well on his guard, and Butler t
Delaware (Delaware, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
rdingly ordered to report to Dix, and the force in New York was temporarily increased by five thousand men. The election took place on the 8th of November, and resulted in the success of Lincoln, who received a majority of more than four hundred thousand votes. No election of course was held in the ten Southern states in the possession of the enemy, and the vote of Tennessee was not counted, although given for Lincoln; but of the remaining twenty-five states, all but three,—New Jersey, Delaware, and Kentucky,—cast their votes for the Union. Fourteen states had authorized their soldiers in the field to vote. Those of New York sent their ballots home sealed, to be cast by their friends; the votes of the soldiers from Minnesota and of most of those from Vermont were not received by the canvassers in time to be counted; but the soldiers from the eleven remaining states gave a majority for Lincoln, of eighty-five thousand four hundred and sixty-one; Beyond all question, this maj
Ohio (United States) (search for this): chapter 4
at can start at once. On the 29th, becoming still more anxious, he sent his chief of staff, General Rawlins, as bearer of special orders to Rosecrans. In his instructions to Rawlins he said: .. Now that Price is retreating from Missouri, it is believed that the whole force sent to that state from other departments can be spared at once. . . If it is found that the enemy under Hood or Beauregard have actually attempted an invasion of Tennessee, or those under Forrest are approaching the Ohio river, you will send them directly to Major-General Thomas, to confront and frustrate such a movement. . . General Sherman will be instructed that no force, except that already south of the Tennessee and such as General Canby can send, will be used between the Tennessee river and the Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico. If he goes south, he must take care of himself, without the support of a pursuing column. Then, as if with a premonition of what was about to occur, and to answer objection in adv
Opelika (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
t knew what point would be the terminus of his march; and in this last despatch to the general-in-chief, Sherman said: If I start before I hear further from you, or before further developments turn my course, you may take it for granted that I have moved via Griffin to Barnesville; that I break up the road between Columbus and Macon good, and then, if I feign on Columbus, will move via Macon and Millen to Savannah; or if I feign on Macon, you may take it for granted I have shot off towards Opelika, Montgomery, and Mobile bay or Pensacola. He concluded: I will not attempt to send couriers back, but trust to the Richmond papers to keep you well advised. . . I will see that the road is broken completely between the Etowa and the Chattahoochee, and that Atlanta itself is utterly destroyed. On the 7th, he said: By the 10th, the election will be over, the troops all paid, and all our surplus property will be back to Chattanooga. On that day or the following, if affairs should remain
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