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Winona (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ch sounds like an echo from Balaklava, says that after giving the order to retreat the brigade retired, about 300 in number, in passably good order, to their original position; and that Lieutenant Hester informed him that a reputable Federal officer told him (Hester) that dead Mississippians were found higher up the hill, after the battle, than soldiers of any other command. Rietti Annals, p. 149.Dr. B. F. Ward, than whom no man stands higher for character and intelligence, now living at Winona, in a letter dated January 15, 1889, says, that he remained for three weeks. on the battlefield of Gettysburg under an order from Gen. Harry Heth, in charge of the wounded of his division, and that the fire of Cemetery Hill having been concentrated on Heth's division, he saw no reason why North Carolinians, Mississippians, Tennesseeans, Alabamians, should not participate in whatever honors were won on that day, for, says he, all soldiers know that the number killed is the one and only test o
Meridian (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
y. On the 12th there was a heavy cannonade from the Federal batteries, and a feeble assault was made on Breckinridge's line, which was vigorously repulsed, the Federals losing about 500 men, including 200 captured, and the colors of three Illinois regiments. The bombardment was kept up during the following days, the Federals meanwhile extending their lines to Pearl river north and south of the town, and destroying the railroad. On the night of the 16th Johnston withdrew his army toward Meridian, where he subsequently made his headquarters. His loss during the siege was 71 killed, 504 wounded, 25 missing. The Federal loss, 130 killed, 762 wounded, and 231 missing. According to Sherman's account he captured the heavy guns and 400 prisoners. He immediately set to work destroying the town and ravaging the surrounding country, in order to make the place untenable by Confederate forces. On the 18th he reported to Grant: We have made fine progress to-day in the work of destruction.
Murfreesboro (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
this memorable field. Without a single exception, so far as my knowledge at this time extends, they have borne themselves gallantly and added fresh laurels to those so nobly won upon the former fields of Shiloh, Munfordville, Perryville and Murfreesboro. The brigade numbered 156 officers and 1,709 enlisted men on the morning of the 20th. The loss was 558, of whom 80 were killed, 454 wounded and 24 missing. Among the killed was Maj. John C. Thompson, of the Forty-fourth, a noble patriot, who had commanded his regiment with gallantry at Murfreesboro. On the night of the 20th, Col. J. H. Sharp took command of the brigade, General Anderson having been called to command Hindman's division. Humphreys' brigade took part in the assault upon Thomas' right, and captured during the day over 400 prisoners, five stand of colors, and 1,200 small arms. On the 22d a detachment of thirty men from the Eighteenth captured 9 officers and 120 men on the mountain near Rossville. Walthall's brigad
Rossville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
urth, a noble patriot, who had commanded his regiment with gallantry at Murfreesboro. On the night of the 20th, Col. J. H. Sharp took command of the brigade, General Anderson having been called to command Hindman's division. Humphreys' brigade took part in the assault upon Thomas' right, and captured during the day over 400 prisoners, five stand of colors, and 1,200 small arms. On the 22d a detachment of thirty men from the Eighteenth captured 9 officers and 120 men on the mountain near Rossville. Walthall's brigade on Sunday moved first toward the left and came under a severe fire, in which Colonel Reynolds was killed and Major Johnson was wounded. Toward evening the brigade was sent to the extreme right of the Confederate line, and advanced with skirmishing across the Chattanooga road, between Thomas and that city. Here the brigade suffered severely from the enfilading fire of three batteries, and was compelled to withdraw. Col. J. I. Scales was captured here, and Lieutenan
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
rt C. Wood; the Fourth, Maj. T. R. Stockdale, and Capt. Calvit Roberts' battery. The Fourth was subsequently transferred from Starke to Adams. General Chalmers' division was made up of three brigades. That commanded by Col. W. F. Slemons contained, in addition to an Arkansas and a Tennessee regiment, Col. John McQuirk's Third regiment State troops; the Fifth regiment, Col. James Z. George, and Capt. J. M. McLendon's battery. Col. Robert McCulloch's brigade held, in addition to his own Missouri regiment, the First Partisans, Lieut.-Col. L. B. Hovis; Eighteenth battalion, Lieut.-Col. A. H. Chalmers; and the Buckner battery, Lieut. H. C. Holt. The brigade of Col. Robert C. Richardson embraced for a time the Twelfth Mississippi, Col. W. M. Inge. A brigade under Col. L. S. Ross was also for a time under Jackson, and then included Colonel Pinson's regiment. Ferguson's brigade, operating in northeast Mississippi, included the Twelfth cavalry, Col. W. M. Inge, and later was assigned t
Ringgold, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
Chapter 10: Operations in Mississippi July to December, 1863 siege of Jackson minor operations in the State service of Mississippians outside the State battle of Chickamauga Knoxville Chancellorsville Missionary Ridge Ringgold Gettysburg. The return of the army which General Johnston had collected at Jackson for June 25th shows the following organization: Division of Maj.-Gen. John C. Breckinridge—brigades of D. W. Adams, Helm and Stovall, aggregate present, 6,884. brigade and Swett's artillery battalion shared the creditable work where Cleburne, fighting all day, bloodily repulsed the enemy. Swett's battery was hotly engaged the whole day and lost some noble officers and men. But on Taylor's Ridge, near Ringgold, where Cleburne made his famous stand, saving the army and winning the thanks of Congress, Lowrey's Thirty-second and Forty-fifth Mississippi, under Col. A. B. Hardcastle, and the Fifteenth battalion sharpshooters, under Capt. Daniel Coleman, we
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
n strong force before his works. Johnston expected an immediate assault and posted his forces on the intrenched line: Loring on the right, then Walker, French and Breckinridge to the left, while the cavalry under Jackson observed the fords of Pearl river above and below the town. Sherman, instead of attacking at once, began intrenching and constructing batteries, finding hills from which he could throw a cross fire of shot and shell into all parts of the town. There was spirited skirmishing line, which was vigorously repulsed, the Federals losing about 500 men, including 200 captured, and the colors of three Illinois regiments. The bombardment was kept up during the following days, the Federals meanwhile extending their lines to Pearl river north and south of the town, and destroying the railroad. On the night of the 16th Johnston withdrew his army toward Meridian, where he subsequently made his headquarters. His loss during the siege was 71 killed, 504 wounded, 25 missing. The
Sandy Springs (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
amous McMinnville raid. On October 14th, General McPherson, commanding at Vicksburg, started on an expedition toward Canton with 6,500 infantry and Winslow's cavalry brigade. His advance was gallantly checked by Cosby's brigade under Col. Wirt Adams, and Logan's brigade, on Bogue Chitto creek, and the expedition turned back considerably short of its destination. On October 26th, Gen. Samuel F. Ferguson, with a small command, attacked and routed the First Alabama (U. S.) cavalry, near Bay Springs. Gen. Leonidas L. Polk was assigned to the command of the army of the Mississippi, October 23d, General Johnston retaining his position at the head of the department. Early in November, when Grant, now in supreme command of the United States forces between the Mississippi and the Alleghanies, was making a desperate effort to hurry Sherman to the relief of Chattanooga, besieged by Bragg, Chalmers was ordered by Johnston to harass the rear of Sherman's corps and destroy the railroad beh
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
combated by the cavalry brigades of Generals Whitfield and Cosby. In August, Maj.-Gen. S. D. Lee had been given command of all the cavalry in Mississippi, including the brigades of Jackson, Cosby, Chalmers, and Richardson. Early in October General Chalmers was ordered to take his own and Richardson's brigades and make a raid on the Memphis & Charleston railroad, to divert attention from another movement contemplated by Lee. After some minor operations he fought a considerable action near Salem, on October 8th, in which the commands of McQuirk and Major Chalmers, and McCulloch's Missouri cavalry, bore the brunt of battle. The enemy retired, and Chalmers, being now reinforced by Richardson's brigade, skirmished with the Federal cavalry toward La Grange. Early on the 11th he attacked Collierville, Tenn., which General Sherman had just entered with his staff and a battalion, increasing the garrison, previously composed of 240 men of the Sixty-sixth Indiana, to 480. Sherman took com
Clinton (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
Division of Maj.-Gen. W. W. Loring —brigades of John Adams, Buford, and Featherston, aggregate present, 7,427. Division of Maj.-Gen. W. H. T. Walker—brigades of Ector, Gist, Gregg and Wilson, aggregate present, 9,571. Cavalry division, Brig.-Gen. W. H. Jackson—brigades of Cosby and Whitfield, aggregate present, 4,373. Camp of direction, 247; reserve artillery, 294. Grand aggregate present was reported at 36,315; effective total, 28,154. Breckinridge's division was ordered forward to Clinton from Jackson, June 30th, and on the evening of July 1st Johnston's army encamped between Brownsville and the Yazoo river. Col. Wirt Adams, reconnoitering near Edwards, reported that the Federal line was weakest south of the railroad, and that the Federal army was suffering greatly from disease, and quite discouraged by its heavy losses. Many citizens, he said, express the confident belief that the climate alone will cause them to raise the siege if our garrison could hold out three weeks.<
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