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Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
r operations in the State service of Mississippians outside the State battle of Chickamauga Knoxville Chancellorsville Missionary Ridge Ringgold Gettysburg. The return of the army which Gen Capt. J. W. White and eight others killed, and 84 wounded. In the arduous campaign against Knoxville, Humphreys' Mississippi brigade shared not only the sufferings of the Confederate troops in thn largely by the sacrifice of their blood. In the assault at daylight, November 29th, upon Fort Sanders at Knoxville, Humphreys' brigade and Bryan's Georgians were selected as the storming party. Knoxville, Humphreys' brigade and Bryan's Georgians were selected as the storming party. The Eighteenth and Twenty-first being on picket duty, the Thirteenth and Seventeenth led the assault, followed by three of Bryan's regiments, advancing in columns of regiments. The men forced their mas M. Griffin; Twenty-first, Col. B. G. Humphreys. This is the brigade whose gallant work at Knoxville has already been mentioned. The other in R. H. Anderson's division, and commanded by Brig.-Ge
Stanford, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
same month the Fourth cavalry shared in the brilliant capture of the Federal force at Brentwood, by Forrest's command. At the organization of Bragg's army preceding the battle of Chickamauga, the Fifth Mississippi, Lieut.-Col. W. L. Sykes, and the Eighth, Col. John C. Wilkinson, formed part of the brigade of John K. Jackson, Cheatham's division, Polk's corps. The artillery of this division, under command of Maj. Melancthon Smith, included Smith's battery, under Lieut. W. B. Turner, and Stanford's battery, Capt. Thomas J. Stanford. The Thirty-second and Forty-fifth Mississippi, under Col. M. P. Lowrey, and the Fifteenth battalion sharpshooters, Maj. A. T. Hawkins, were part of Wood's brigade, Cleburne's division, D. H. Hill's corps. In Breckinridge's division Mississippi was represented by the headquarters escort, the cavalry company of Capt. H. L. Foules. In W. H. T. Walker's reserve corps was Capt. M. Pound's battalion of sharpshooters, with Ector's brigade. Walthall's briga
Balaklava (Ukraine) (search for this): chapter 10
Hester, both distinguished Mississippians, fell severely wounded, and Capt. J. R. Prince, of Noxubee county, after trying in vain to find a superior officer, and learning that strong reinforcements were moving up from the Federal rear, gave the order for retreat. Lieutenants Baker and Hester were left on the field and were taken prisoners and carried to the Union rear, where there was disorder and confusion at this point. Captain Prince, in a recent letter which sounds like an echo from Balaklava, says that after giving the order to retreat the brigade retired, about 300 in number, in passably good order, to their original position; and that Lieutenant Hester informed him that a reputable Federal officer told him (Hester) that dead Mississippians were found higher up the hill, after the battle, than soldiers of any other command. Rietti Annals, p. 149.Dr. B. F. Ward, than whom no man stands higher for character and intelligence, now living at Winona, in a letter dated January 1
Enterprise (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
hich confirmed his fame as one of the greatest generals of the age. At the close of 1863 the Federal troops in Mississippi were stationed as follows: 4,000 under Gen. J. D. Stevenson at Corinth; about 16,000 at and near Vicksburg, 2,500 cavalry at Hebron, and 150 at Natchez, under General McPherson. At Memphis and La Grange, Tenn., were about 20,000 of Hurlbut's corps. On the Confederate side, in the latter part of 1863, there were still about 2,500 men present in the parole camp at Enterprise, under command of General Forney. General Loring's division, with headquarters at Canton, contained the brigades of Buford, Featherston and John Adams. Featherston's brigade, entirely Mississippian, was made up of the Third regiment, Col. T. A. Mellon; Twenty-second, Lieut.--Col. H. J. Reid; Thirty-first, Lieut.-Col. M. D. L. Stephens; Thirty-third, Col. D. W. Hurst; First battalion sharpshooters, Maj. James M. Stigler. Adams' brigade included the Sixth regiment, Col. Robert Lowry; Fourt
Jacinto (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ders that they should pay for supplies, and that it is now to the interest of the government that plundering and pillaging should cease. Winslow continued north to Memphis, fighting at the Coldwater with some of Chalmers' force, and Phillips returned to Tennessee, reporting a large amount of destruction in spite of Winslow's interference. After this no affairs of importance occurred in Mississippi for a considerable period. There was a skirmish at Holly Springs, September 7th; one near Jacinto on the same day; and an expedition from the Big Black near Vicksburg to Yazoo City was spiritedly combated by the cavalry brigades of Generals Whitfield and Cosby. In August, Maj.-Gen. S. D. Lee had been given command of all the cavalry in Mississippi, including the brigades of Jackson, Cosby, Chalmers, and Richardson. Early in October General Chalmers was ordered to take his own and Richardson's brigades and make a raid on the Memphis & Charleston railroad, to divert attention from ano
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ol. M. B Harris, Maj. S. B. Thomas; Sixteenth, Col. Samuel E. Baker; Nineteenth, Col. N. H. Harris; and the Forty-eighth, Col. J. M. Jayne. When the force at Fredericksburg was depleted by Jackson's flank movement, Barksdale's brigade was given a front of three miles to hold on Sunday morning, including Marye's hill, where was pobed guns, even after his vast hordes had swept over and around the walls. The brigade lost, in killed and wounded, 226. While Barksdale was left to defend Fredericksburg, Posey's brigade was fighting brilliantly at Chancellorsville. Posey and Mahone had been stationed at United States ford, and were among the first to confronremainder of Posey's brigade fell back to Chancellorsville and thence, after withdrawing the guard at the ford, to a point midway between Chancellorsville and Fredericksburg, where they intrenched. This was the extreme right of Lee's army up to Jackson's flank movement. Thence, on May 1st, Posey's men marched on the plank road,
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
, aide-de-camp on the staff of the President, had been promoted to brigadier-general in September, 1862, and assigned to the command of a Mississippi brigade, composed of the Second, Eleventh and Forty-second infantry, and this command, after serving on the Richmond and Blackwater lines, was ordered to Goldsboro, North Carolina, in December. It served under Longstreet in the Suffolk campaign, and in May was transferred to Heth's division of A. P. Hill's corps, and went to the front in Northern Virginia early in June. The Second was now commanded by Col. John M. Stone; Eleventh by Col. F. M. Green; Forty-second by Col. H. R. Miller. The Fifty-fifth North Carolina made the fourth regiment of the brigade. On the 1st of July, 1863, after Pettigrew's brigade of the same division had discovered the enemy at Gettysburg, the Eleventh was detailed as guard for the wagon train, and the other regiments of the brigade joined in the bloody but successful attack upon Reynolds' corps. General
Brentwood, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
sissippi soldiers in the battles of 1863 of the army of Tennessee, and the career of those who served in the army of Northern Virginia. In the cavalry operations in Tennessee early in 1863, the First and Twenty-eighth Mississippi cavalry regiments and the Fourth, Col. James Gordon, took a prominent part in Van Dorn's defeat and capture of Coburn's brigade at Thompson's Station, March 5th. Later in the same month the Fourth cavalry shared in the brilliant capture of the Federal force at Brentwood, by Forrest's command. At the organization of Bragg's army preceding the battle of Chickamauga, the Fifth Mississippi, Lieut.-Col. W. L. Sykes, and the Eighth, Col. John C. Wilkinson, formed part of the brigade of John K. Jackson, Cheatham's division, Polk's corps. The artillery of this division, under command of Maj. Melancthon Smith, included Smith's battery, under Lieut. W. B. Turner, and Stanford's battery, Capt. Thomas J. Stanford. The Thirty-second and Forty-fifth Mississippi, u
Perryville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
and a little further on the Forty-first captured a battery of five guns. Several stand of colors were also taken and many prisoners. In this report, Anderson testified to his high appreciation of the valor, courage and skill displayed by the officers and troops on this memorable field. Without a single exception, so far as my knowledge at this time extends, they have borne themselves gallantly and added fresh laurels to those so nobly won upon the former fields of Shiloh, Munfordville, Perryville and Murfreesboro. The brigade numbered 156 officers and 1,709 enlisted men on the morning of the 20th. The loss was 558, of whom 80 were killed, 454 wounded and 24 missing. Among the killed was Maj. John C. Thompson, of the Forty-fourth, a noble patriot, who had commanded his regiment with gallantry at Murfreesboro. On the night of the 20th, Col. J. H. Sharp took command of the brigade, General Anderson having been called to command Hindman's division. Humphreys' brigade took part in t
Woodville (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
own was there, with the few boats that he had improvised, and a small garrison in the fortifications. He repulsed the gunboats at first, and blew up the Federal ironclad De Kalb, with thirteen guns, by a torpedo explosion, but was forced to burn his own flotilla and evacuate the position. At Natchez on the same day, Brigadier-General Ransom landed and occupied the town, whence he made expeditions to destroy military property at Liberty, and a cotton factory and railroad transportation at Woodville. But this field of destruction was soon restricted by the approach of J. L. Logan's cavalry in Mississippi and Harrison's cavalry on the west bank of the river. During the siege of Vicksburg there had been various raids and reconnoissances in northern Mississippi from the Federal posts in Tennessee and at Corinth. General Chalmers was also active in the northeast, embarrassing the enemy's transportation on the river. Col. Wirt Adams engaged Federal gunboats with his artillery at Live
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