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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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arlottesville. Crook sent his cavalry under Averell against Wytheville and Saltville, while he led his infantry towards Dublin and New River bridge. Averell was defeated and driven back from Wytheville by Jno. Morgan; but Crook's larger force met with more success. Sigel having begun his movement up the Valley, General Lee had ordered Breckinridge with the mass of his forces, to go to meet him. This left an entirely inadequate force to oppose Crook, who defeated it, under W. E. Jones and Jenkins, at Cloyd's Mountain, and subsequently pushed on to Dublin and New River bridge. After burning the bridge and doing some slight damage to the railroad, Crook promptly returned to Meadow Bluff, where he re-united with Averell. Meantime Breckinridge had reached Staunton, and was moving rapidly down the Valley to meet Sigel, who was advancing. Learning on the 14th May that Sigel was near New Market, Breckinridge left his camp at Lacy Springs, nine miles south of that town, after midnight,
Wade Hampton (search for this): chapter 42
king as vigorous steps as his resources permitted, to checkmate this movement in his rear. As soon as the defeat of Jones was known, Breckinridge was sent back to Rockfish Gap to unite with Vaughan (who had succeeded Jones) in opposing Hunter. Hampton, at the same time, was sent to drive back Sheridan's cavalry, which had been sent forward to meet Hunter at Charlottesville and coperate with him in the attempt on Lynchburg. A few days later, General Early, with the Second corps, was detached and ordered in the same direction to ensure the defeat of Hunter. Hampton performed his work admirably, barred Sheridan's progress at Louisa Courthouse, and forced him to return, baffled, from a fruitless expedition. Breckinridge transferred his troops to Lynchburg to hold it as long as he might against Hunter. It was the 13th June that Early left General Lee's lines at Richmond, and on this day Hunter threw forward his advance from Lexington to Buchanan. Early made a rapid march, reaching
incipal bodies being one of about 10,000 under Crook, in Southwest Virginia, and another of 8,500 usly with the advance of Grant on the Rapidan. Crook was to break the Virginia and Tennessee Railroy, and threaten Staunton and Charlottesville. Crook sent his cavalry under Averell against Wythevi and doing some slight damage to the railroad, Crook promptly returned to Meadow Bluff, where he reharlottesville, and Lynchburg. Hunter ordered Crook to march on Staunton from the west, and moved lled. Hunter next day entered Staunton, where Crook joined him with 10,000 men. The Federal army nwere now withdrawn, and Hunter's forces, under Crook, were left to hold the Valley. Early quickly more held the Potomac. Mr. Pond does not give Crook's strength in this fight, but as the returns fepartment of West Virginia, it is certain that Crook outnumbered Early, who, according to Mr. Pond,to the hard blows which demolished Wallace and Crook; to the splendid game of bluff, which for six [5 more...]
864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. A Review, by Colonel Wm. Allan. This is one of the most interesting of the Scribner series and is valuable because of the clearness with which it is written, and of the amount of research it shows in bringing together information from widely scattered sources, concerning an exciting and important campaign. As history, too, it is far better than General Doubleday's Gettysburg, though it is far behind the best numbers of the series. Mr. Rope's Army under Pope, and General Palfrey's Antietam, for instance. It is mainly a narrative of the Federal operations in the Valley in 1864, only describing and discussing the Confederate side, so far as is necessary to the comprehension of the achievements of the Union armies. While, too, Mr. Pond's language is temperate, and he aims at fairness, his bias is very evident, and often converts his pages into a defence of, or panegyric upon the Federal commanders. He is not careful to state t
Frederick Grant (search for this): chapter 42
t was not less than that which forbade it. General Grant, when he learned of Sigel's defeat, had hiforward from West Virginia to Harper's Ferry. Grant sent up the other two divisions of the Sixth c holding the defences until the troops sent by Grant could arrive. Early's forces after their severe and had caused two corps to be detached by Grant to oppose him. A much larger force than his ow This act of Hunter's was not in obedience to Grant's instructions, but rather in contravention ofand at his own request, made upon finding that Grant had determined practicably to supersede him. Tnd of all the forces gathered to crush Early. Grant had come up himself to see the situation. He out of the Valley. The large detachments that Grant had made to Sheridan enabled Lee to order Kersgor and skill with which they were handled. Grant now informed Sheridan that his own progress at the mountains and move on Charlottesville, as Grant desired. He therefore retired down the Valley[14 more...]
John C. Breckinridge (search for this): chapter 42
er Sigel, in person, near Martinsburg. General Breckinridge commanded all the Confederate forces inment up the Valley, General Lee had ordered Breckinridge with the mass of his forces, to go to meet here he re-united with Averell. Meantime Breckinridge had reached Staunton, and was moving rapidlhe 14th May that Sigel was near New Market, Breckinridge left his camp at Lacy Springs, nine miles sigel's column numbered 8,500. Mr. Pond puts Breckinridge's numbers at from 4,600 to 5,000. Colonel Stoddard Johnston says that Breckinridge had 3,100 muskets in his infantry, and if so, his force was he learns that Sigel is disposed of, orders Breckinridge to Hanover Junction, and leaves the defencet. The result proved that the withdrawal of Breckinridge was unfortunate, but the necessity which pr As soon as the defeat of Jones was known, Breckinridge was sent back to Rockfish Gap to unite withurn, baffled, from a fruitless expedition. Breckinridge transferred his troops to Lynchburg to hold[1 more...]
J. Longstreet (search for this): chapter 42
dvance, and again Sheridan fell back, this time to Halltown. At last he had reached a position he deemed himself strong enough to hold against Early's 21,000 men. Early finding it impossible to get at the Federal army in its last position, moved on the 25th towards the Potomac, and ran against and severely defeated Sheridan's cavalry. Once more it seemed as if the North was to be invaded. Sheridan telegraphed that Early had marched with the intention of crossing the Potomac; that two of Longstreet's divisions were with him; that his own army might have to cross to the north side; that he hardly thought they would attempt to go to Washington. He hurried troops to hold the South Mountain gaps, near Boonsboro. But Early did not cross; he had already gone to the utmost verge of prudence in the presence of a foe, whose strength was between two and three times as great as his own, and he therefore fell back next day to Bunker Hill and Stephenson's. Mr. Pond attempts a defence of thes
W. Ellis Jones (search for this): chapter 42
eral Lee had ordered Breckinridge with the mass of his forces, to go to meet him. This left an entirely inadequate force to oppose Crook, who defeated it, under W. E. Jones and Jenkins, at Cloyd's Mountain, and subsequently pushed on to Dublin and New River bridge. After burning the bridge and doing some slight damage to the railry Grant's overwhelming numbers, as soon as he learns that Sigel is disposed of, orders Breckinridge to Hanover Junction, and leaves the defence of the Valley to W. E. Jones, with some 5,000 or 6,000 men scraped together from every part of it. The result proved that the withdrawal of Breckinridge was unfortunate, but the necessity wm the west, and moved towards the same point himself from the lower Shenandoah Valley. On June 5th Hunter, at the head of his column of 8,500 men, came up with W. E. Jones at Piedmont, some ten or twelve miles in advance of Staunton. Jones's mixed and not well-organized force of about 5,500 men was completely defeated, and Jones
fered heavily but followed up, and on September 22, at Fisher's Hill, inflicted another defeat upon the Confederates. Here, he, under cover of the forest, outflanked Early's left and stampeded it. This quickly led to the abandonment of his whole line, and the loss of eleven guns. Though Early's loss here was nothing like so heavy as at Winchester, the injury done to the morale of the army was much greater. In both battles the Confederates lost valuable officers. At Winchester fell Rodes, Godwin, and Patton, at Fisher's Hill fell A. S. Pendleton, the Assistant Adjutant General of the army—a costly offering upon their country's altar. Sheridan now marched forward with little opposition. Early fell back before him to Brown's Gap, while the Federals pushed on to Staunton and Waynesboroa. Kershaw's infantry and Rosser's cavalry were sent to Early's aid, and in a short time he was ready for fight again. The Confederate cavalry was so active that Sheridan found it difficult to prote
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): chapter 42
were now withdrawn, and Hunter's forces, under Crook, were left to hold the Valley. Early quickly discovered this, and promptly advancing from Strasburg, on July 24th, fell upon Crook, on the battlefield of Kernstown, where Shields had repulsed Jackson in 1862. Early's victory was thorough, Crook's forces being routed with heavy loss, and in two days Early once more held the Potomac. Mr. Pond does not give Crook's strength in this fight, but as the returns for August show some 22,000 men in part of his campaign. As time goes on, however, and the truth becomes more clearly seen, history will do justice to the vigor which drove Hunter almost in panic out of the Valley, to the audacity and celerity—only comparable with that of Stonewall Jackson—which carried 15,000 men, in less than three weeks, from Salem to the suburbs of Washington and spread consternation in the North; to the skill which extricated his army in safety from the multitude of foes which quickly gathered about it;
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