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w weeks later Colonel Lee was ordered, and came to Washington, reaching there three days before the inauguration of President Lincoln. At that time South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia and Louisiana, had already seceded from the U of April, under bombardment, the Federal Commander, Major Anderson, with its garrison, surrendered. On April 15th President Lincoln issued his proclamation for 75,000 men to make war against the seceded States, which he styled: Combinations too pons against the breasts of her Southern brethren, or make her own breast their shield. On April 17th Virginia answered Mr. Lincoln's proclamation with the Ordinance of Secession, and, like Pallas-Athene, the front fighter stepped with intrepid brow General Phil. Kearney fell at Ox Hill, he sent his sword and horse through the lines to his mourning widow—and that when Lincoln was struck down by an assassin's hand, he denounced the deed as a crime previously unknown to the country, and one that
Bedford Forrest (search for this): chapter 60
ke the fire of batteries without returning it, than to rise and charge to the cannon's mouth. It is harder to give the soft answer that turns away wrath than to retort a word with a blow. De Long, in the Frozen Arctic wastes, dying alone inch by inch of cold and starvation, yet intent on his work, and writing lines for the benefit of others, deserved, as well as the Marshal of France, who received it, the name of bravest of the brave. The artless little Alabama girl, who was guiding General Forrest along a dangerous path when the enemy fired a volley upon him, and who instinctly spread her skirts and cried: Get behind me! had a spirit as high as that which filled the bosom of Joan of Arc, or Charlotte Corday. The little Holland boy, who, seeing the water oozing through the dyke, and the town near by about to be deluged and destroyed, neither cried nor ran, but stopped, and all alone, stifled the opening gap with earth, in instant peril of being swept to death unhonored and unk
Francis Preston Blair (search for this): chapter 60
can have undergone more trying ordeal, or met it with higher spirit of heroic sacrifice. There was naught on earth that could swerve Robert E. Lee from the path where, to his clear comprehension, honor and duty lay. To the statesman, Mr. Francis Preston Blair, who brought him the tender of supreme command, he answered: Mr. Blair, I look upon secession as anarchy. If I owned the four millions of slaves in the South, I would sacrifice them all to the Union. But how can I draw my sword agaMr. Blair, I look upon secession as anarchy. If I owned the four millions of slaves in the South, I would sacrifice them all to the Union. But how can I draw my sword against Virginia? Draw his sword against Virginia? Perish the thought! Over all the voices that called him he heard the still small voice that ever whispers to the soul of the spot that gave it birth, and of her who gave it suck; and over every ambitious dream, there rose the face of the angel that guards the door of home. On the 20th of April, as soon as the news of Virginia's secession reached him, he resigned his commission in the army of the United States, and thus wrote to his sister
Thomas Hughes (search for this): chapter 60
um of life, so they reveal the inward nature of men and furnish keys to history. It is in the office, the street, the field, the workshop, and by the fireside, that men show what stuff they are made of, not less than in those eventful actions which write themselves in lightnings across the skies and mark the rise and fall of nations. Nay, more—the highest attributes of human nature are not disclosed in action, but in self-restraint and repose. Self-restraint, as has been truly said by Thomas Hughes, is the highest form of self-assertion. It is harder, as every soldier knows, to lie down and take the fire of batteries without returning it, than to rise and charge to the cannon's mouth. It is harder to give the soft answer that turns away wrath than to retort a word with a blow. De Long, in the Frozen Arctic wastes, dying alone inch by inch of cold and starvation, yet intent on his work, and writing lines for the benefit of others, deserved, as well as the Marshal of France, wh
J. A. Early (search for this): chapter 60
Remarks of General Early—oration of Major John W. Daniel, Ll.D., of Va.—description of the ceremonies, &c. The occasion of the unveiling of Valentine's superb figure of Lee, was one of extraordinary interest, and deserves a place in our records. General J. A. Early, First Vice-President of the Lee Memorial Association, presided on the occasion, called the vast assemblage to order, and called on the Rev. R. J. McBryde, of Lexington, who made an appropriate and fervent prayer. General Early then made the following Introductory remarks. Friends, Comrades and Fellow-Citizens, Ladies and Gentlemen: The sickness of General Joseph E. Johnston, the distinguished President of the Lee Memorial Association, which prevents his attendance here, has devolved on me, as First Vice-President, the unexpected duty of presiding on this occasion; and I am sure no one can regret the cause of this change in the programme more than I do. The great commander of the Army of Northe
Charles A. Davidson (search for this): chapter 60
zed by the appointment of General John C. Breckinridge, of Kentucky, who had been the last Secretary of War of the Confederate States, as President, and of fifteen VicePresi-dents, as also a Treasurer—the nineteen persons named in the act of incorporation, by the terms of the act itself, constituting the Executive Committee. The chairman of that committee was General William N. Pendleton, the distinguished Chief of Artillery of the Army of Northern Virginia, and the secretary was Captain Charles A. Davidson, a gallant officer of the First Virginia Battalion. The act of incorporation does not specify the place at which the proposed monument should be erected, nor the nature of it; but, after the passage of the act changing the name of Washington College to that of Washington and Lee University, it was determined by the Executive Committee, with the sanction of the authorities of the University, that the monument should consist of a mausoleum, attached to the University chapel, whic
Robert E. Scott (search for this): chapter 60
rican officer, he felt it his duty to decline. And so deep was the impression made of his genius and his valor, that General Scott, Commander-in-Chief of the army in which he served, had declared that he was the best soldier he ever saw in the fiel much to found the Union was 10th to assent to its dissolution, and still guided by the wise counsels of such men as Robert E. Scott, Robert Y. Conrad, Jubal A. Early, John B. Baldwin, Samuel McDowell Moore, and A. H. H. Stuart, she persisted in effe of his chamber window, and its guns bear on the portals of his home. A messenger comes from its President and from General Scott, Commander-in-Chief of its army, to tender him supreme command of its forces. Did he accept, and did he succeed, therd. Lee devotes his sword to his native State. Bidding an affectionate adieu to his old friend and commander, General Scott, who mourned his loss, but nobly expressed his confidence in his motives, he repaired to Richmond. Governor John Let
nd McDowell, Letcher, and Kemper, of Virginia; eleven United States Senators—amongst them Parker, of Virginia, Breckinridge, of Kentucky, H. S. Foote, of Mississippi, and William C. Preston, of South Carolina; more than a score of congressmen, twoscore and more of Judges—amongst them Trimble, of the United States Supreme Court; Coalter, Allen, Anderson, and Burks, of the Court of Appeals of Virginia; twelve or more college presidents, and amongst them Moses Hoge and Archibald Alexander, of Hampden-Sidney, James Priestly, of Cumberland College, Tennessee, and G. A. Baxter and Henry Ruffner (who presided here), and Socrates Maupin, of the University of Virginia. These are but a few of those who here garnered the learning that shed so gracious a light in the after-time on them, their country, and their Alma Mater. And could I pause to speak of those who became valiant leaders of men in battle I could name many a noble soldier whose eye greets mine to-day; and, alas! I should recall t
er 13th, and is repulsed with terrible slaughter. 1863—Chancellorsville. With the dawn of spring in 1863, a replenished army with a fresh commander, Fighting Joe Hooker, renews the onset by way of Chancellorsville, and finds Lee with two divisions of Longstreet's corps absent in Southeast Virginia. But slender as are his numbers, Lee is ever aggressive; and while Hooker with the finest army on the planet, as he styled it, is confronting Lee near Chancellorsville, and Early is holding Sedgwick at bay at Fredericksburg, Jackson, who, under Lee's directions, has stealthily marched around him, comes thundering in his rear, and alas! for Fighting Joe, he can only illustrate his pugnacious soubriquet by the consoling reflection that He who fights and runs away Will live to fight another day, for Chancellorsville shines high on the list of Confederate victories, and indeed was one of the grandest victories that ever blazoned the annals of war. The fall of Stonewall Jackson.
John Janney (search for this): chapter 60
votes his sword to his native State. Bidding an affectionate adieu to his old friend and commander, General Scott, who mourned his loss, but nobly expressed his confidence in his motives, he repaired to Richmond. Governor John Letcher immediately appointed him to the command-in-chief of the Virginia forces, and the Convention unanimously confirmed the nomination. Memorable and impressive was the scene when he came into the presence of that body on April 23d. Its venerable President, John Janney, with brief, sententious eloquence, addressed him, and concluded saying: Sir, we have by this unanimous vote expressed our convictions that you are at this day, among the living citizens of Virginia, first in war. We pray to God most fervently that you may so conduct the operations committed to your charge, that it may be said of you that you are first in peace, and when that time comes, you will have earned the still prouder distinction of being first in the hearts of your country
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