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the inner country, and renew the unequal strife? Not till that hope is tested will they yield! As the day dawns, a remnant of the cavalry under Fitz. Lee is forming, and Gordon's infantry, scarce two thousand strong, are touching elbows for the last charge. Once more the thrilling rebel cheer rings through the Virginia woods, and with all their wonted fierceness they fall upon Sheridan's men. Ah! yes, victory still clings to the tattered battle-flags. Yes, the troopers of our gallant Fitz. are as dauntless as when they followed the plume of Stuart, the flower of cavaliers. Yes, the matchless infantry of tattered uniforms and bright muskets under Gordon, the brave, move with as swift, intrepid tread as when of old—Stonewall led the way. Soldiers of Manassas, of Richmond, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, of the Wilderness, of Spotsylvania, of Cold Harbor, of Petersburg—scarred and sinewy veterans of fifty fields, your glories are still about you, your
Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. Remarks of General Early—oration of Major John W. Daniel, Ll.D., of Va.—description of the ceremonies, &c. The occasion of the unveiling of Valentine's superb figure of Lee, was one of extraordinary interest, and deserves a place in our records. General J. A. Early, First Vice-President of the Lee attached to the University chapel, which latter had been constructed under the supervision of General Lee himself, where his remains should be deposited in a vault, to be surmounted by a recumbent fi figure, and years ago he completed his work in a manner that links his name forever with that of Lee. Upon the death of General Breckinridge General Joseph E. Johnston, the senior surviving officer of the Confederate army, and the predecessor of General Lee in command of that army, which, under the lead of the latter, became so renowned as the Army of Northern Virginia, was made the Preside
John W. Daniel (search for this): chapter 60
Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. Remarks of General Early—oration of Major John W. Daniel, Ll.D., of Va.—description of the ceremonies, &c. The occasion of the unveiling of Valentine's superb figure of Lee, was one of extraordinary interest, and deserves a place in oursympathize in the bodily affliction, which alone prevents him from being with us. And now permit me to introduce to you, as the orator of the occasion, Major John W. Daniel, who needs no words of commendation from me, but will speak for himself: Address of Major John W. Daniel, Ll. D. Mr. President, My Comrades and Major John W. Daniel, Ll. D. Mr. President, My Comrades and Countrymen: There was no happier or lovelier home than that of Colonel Robert Edward Lee, in the spring of 1861, when for the first time its threshold was darkened with the omens of civil war. Crowning the green slopes of the Virginia hills that overlook the Potomac, and embowered in stately trees, stood the venerable mansio
G. A. Baxter (search for this): chapter 60
tors—amongst them Parker, of Virginia, Breckinridge, of Kentucky, H. S. Foote, of Mississippi, and William C. Preston, of South Carolina; more than a score of congressmen, twoscore and more of Judges—amongst them Trimble, of the United States Supreme Court; Coalter, Allen, Anderson, and Burks, of the Court of Appeals of Virginia; twelve or more college presidents, and amongst them Moses Hoge and Archibald Alexander, of Hampden-Sidney, James Priestly, of Cumberland College, Tennessee, and G. A. Baxter and Henry Ruffner (who presided here), and Socrates Maupin, of the University of Virginia. These are but a few of those who here garnered the learning that shed so gracious a light in the after-time on them, their country, and their Alma Mater. And could I pause to speak of those who became valiant leaders of men in battle I could name many a noble soldier whose eye greets mine to-day; and, alas! I should recall the form of many a hero who passed from these halls in the flush of youthf
Upon its eve Jackson has arrived fresh from Harper's Ferry. McClellan's repeated assaults on Lee were everywhere repulsed. He remained on the field September 18th, and then recrossed the Potomac into Virginia. The winter of 1862 comes, and Burnside, succeeding McClellan, assails Lee at Fredericksburg on December 13th, and is repulsed with terrible slaughter. 1863—Chancellorsville. With the dawn of spring in 1863, a replenished army with a fresh commander, Fighting Joe Hooker, renews eulogy of their sturdy foe. One summer month had been summer time enough for Grant along that impervious line; and there at Cold Harbor practically closed the sixth expedition aimed directly at the Confederate Capital—McDowell, McClellan, Pope, Burnside, Hooker and now Grant,—all being disastrously repulsed by the Army of Northern Virginia, and all but the first receiving their repulse by the army led by Lee. But Grant in some sort, veiled his reverses by immediately abandoning attack on the no<
G. W. Gordon (search for this): chapter 60
t till that hope is tested will they yield! As the day dawns, a remnant of the cavalry under Fitz. Lee is forming, and Gordon's infantry, scarce two thousand strong, are touching elbows for the last charge. Once more the thrilling rebel cheer rin the plume of Stuart, the flower of cavaliers. Yes, the matchless infantry of tattered uniforms and bright muskets under Gordon, the brave, move with as swift, intrepid tread as when of old—Stonewall led the way. Soldiers of Manassas, of Richmond, S frown the batteries of the Army of the James, under Ord—a solid phalanx stands right athwart the path of Fitz. Lee's and Gordon's men. Too late! the die is cast! The doom is sealed! There is no escape. The eagle is quarried in his eyre; the wouhibited the burning of buildings containing stores of war, lest fire might be communicated to neighbouring homes; and General Gordon, in his public address, had declared: If a torch is applied to a single dwelling, or an insult offered to a female of
Socrates Maupin (search for this): chapter 60
ntucky, H. S. Foote, of Mississippi, and William C. Preston, of South Carolina; more than a score of congressmen, twoscore and more of Judges—amongst them Trimble, of the United States Supreme Court; Coalter, Allen, Anderson, and Burks, of the Court of Appeals of Virginia; twelve or more college presidents, and amongst them Moses Hoge and Archibald Alexander, of Hampden-Sidney, James Priestly, of Cumberland College, Tennessee, and G. A. Baxter and Henry Ruffner (who presided here), and Socrates Maupin, of the University of Virginia. These are but a few of those who here garnered the learning that shed so gracious a light in the after-time on them, their country, and their Alma Mater. And could I pause to speak of those who became valiant leaders of men in battle I could name many a noble soldier whose eye greets mine to-day; and, alas! I should recall the form of many a hero who passed from these halls in the flush of youthful manhood, and has long slept with the unreturning brave
herself may join in his solemn requiem. Come, for here he rests, and— On this green bank by this fair stream We set to-day a native stone, That memory may his deeds redeem, When, like our sires, our sons are gone. Come, for here the genius of loftiest poesy in the artist's dream, and through the sculptor's touch, has restored his form and features—a Valentine has lifted the marble veil and disclosed him to us as we would love to look upon him—lying, the flower of knighthood, in Joyous Gard. His sword beside him is sheathed forever. But honor's seal is on his brow, and valor's star is on his breast, and the peace that passeth all understanding descends upon him. Here, not in the hour of his grandest triumph of earth, as when, mid the battle roar, shouting battalions followed his trenchant sword, and bleeding veterans forgot their wounds to leap between him and his enemies—but here in victory, supreme over earth itself, and over death, its conqueror, he rests, his warfare done
er lived. He not only had a kind word for me, but he gave me some money to help me on my way. Better is that praise than any garland of the Poet or the Rhetorician. The relations between Lee and his men. As we glance back through the smoke-drifts of his many campaigns and battles, his kind, considerate acts towards his officers and men gleam through them as brightly as their burnished weapons; and they formed a fellowship as noble as that which bound the Knights of the Round Table to Arthur, the blameless King. His principle of discipline was indicated in his expression that a true man of honor feels himself humbled when he cannot help humbling others, and never exercising stern authority except when absolutely indispensable, his influence was the more potent because it ever appealed to honorable motives and natural affections. In the dark days of the Revolution, two Major-Generals conspired with a faction of the Continental Congress to put Gates in the place of Washington,
lege of Washington, went forward in a career which, for nearly threescore years and ten, was a period of uninterrupted usefulness, prosperity and honor. All ranks of honorable enterprise and ambition in this rising empire felt the impress of the noble spirits who came forth from its halls, trained and equipped for life's arduous tasks with keenest weapons and brightest armor. What glowing names are these that shine on the rolls of the alumni of this honored Alma Mater! Church and State, Field and Forum, Bar and Bench, Hospital and Counting-Room, Lecture-Room and Pulpit—what famous champions and teachers of the right, what trusty workers and leaders in literature and law, and arts, and arms, have they not found in her sons! Seven Governors of States—amongst them Crittenden, of Kentucky, and McDowell, Letcher, and Kemper, of Virginia; eleven United States Senators—amongst them Parker, of Virginia, Breckinridge, of Kentucky, H. S. Foote, of Mississippi, and William C. Preston, of S<
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