hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Fitzhugh Lee 369 33 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 359 1 Browse Search
Frederick Grant 268 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 246 0 Browse Search
Braxton Bragg 242 8 Browse Search
Robert E. Lee 224 0 Browse Search
Jubal A. Early 221 5 Browse Search
Robert Lee 215 1 Browse Search
Robert Edward Lee 193 35 Browse Search
Sheridan 180 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 742 total hits in 224 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 60
lready established his own martial fame at Vera Cruz, Cerro Gordo, Contreras, Cherubusco, Molino del Rey, Chepultepec and Mexico, and had proved how little he depended upon any merit but his own. Such was his early distinction., that when but a Captaly tribute, for Johnston himself had fallen, terribly wounded. The hero, covered with ten wounds received in Florida and Mexico, had been prostrated by another; and when June 1st dawned on the confronting armies, the Army of Northern Virginia was wities devolved upon him required assiduous study and research. Still later, after he returned with great distinction from Mexico, he became the Superintendent and Head of the Military Academy at West Point, and occupying that position for three yearsnatural beauty, and keen sympathy, for all living things show the exquisite sensibilities of his heart. His letters from Mexico teem with expressions of the delight with which he looked upon the bright-winged birds and luxuriant flowers of that sunn
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 60
e deep in bloody foam those swiftly succeeding waves of four years of incessant battle; but now the rock itself was wearing away, and still the waves came on. A new enemy was approaching the sturdy devoted band. In September, 1864, Atlanta fell, and through Georgia to the sea, with fire and sword, swept the victorious columns of Sherman. In January, 1865, the head of the column had been turned northward; and in February, Columbia and Charleston shared the fate that had already befallen Savannah. Yes, a new enemy was approaching the Army of Northern Virginia, and this time in the rear. The homes of the soldiers of the Army of Northern Virginia from the Southern States were now in ashes. Wives, mothers and sisters were wanderers under the wintry skies, flying from the invaders who smote and spared not in their relentless march. Is it wonder that hearts that had never quailed before bayonet or blade beat now with tremulous and irrepressible emotion? Is it wonder that, in the wat
Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 60
are the way for victory. General Lee in command of the Army of Northern Virginia—Richmond, Manassas, Harper's Ferry, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg. On the 3d of June, 1862, General Lee was assigned to command in person the Army of Northern Virginin thousand small arms, two hundred wagons and many stores. But there is no time to rest, for Mc-Clellan presses Lee at Sharpsburg, and there, September 17th, battle is delivered. Upon its eve Jackson has arrived fresh from Harper's Ferry. McClella the brave, move with as swift, intrepid tread as when of old—Stonewall led the way. Soldiers of Manassas, of Richmond, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, of the Wilderness, of Spotsylvania, of Cold Harbor, of Petersburg—scarreg aside from the column, and riding up to the home of the widow of the gallant Colonel John Thornton, who had fallen at Sharpsburg. I have not time to tarry, he says, but I could not pass by without stopping a moment to pay my respects to the widow <
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 60
ized by the appointment of General John C. Breckinridge, of Kentucky, who had been the last Secretary of War of the Confederate States, as President, and of fifteen VicePresi-dents, as also a Treasurer—the nineteen persons named in the act of incorpo Florida, Alabama, Georgia and Louisiana, had already seceded from the Union, and the Provisional Government of the Confederate States was in operation at Montgomery. The Virginia Convention was in session, but slow and deliberate in its course. orses and baggage, and each officer and man to be allowed to return to his home, and, mark it, not to be disturbed by United States authority as long as they observe their parole, and the laws in force where they reside. Thus at last was the libeeven Governors of States—amongst them Crittenden, of Kentucky, and McDowell, Letcher, and Kemper, of Virginia; eleven United States Senators—amongst them Parker, of Virginia, Breckinridge, of Kentucky, H. S. Foote, of Mississippi, and William C. Pre<
Williamsburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 60
the new-born Confederacy with the glory of splendid military achievement. Still later in the progress of events, Johnston had exhibited again his strategic skill in holding Mc-Clellan at bay on the lines of Yorktown, with a force so small that it seemed hardihood to oppose him with it—had eluded his toils by a retreat up the Peninsula, so cleanly conducted, that little was lost beyond the space vacated—had turned and fiercely smitten his advancing columns near the old Colonial Capitol of Williamsburg on May 5th, 1862, and had planted his army firmly around Richmond. Pending the siege of Yorktown, a thing had happened that probably had no parallel in history. The great body of General Johnston's army had reorganized itself under the laws of the Confederacy, while lying under the fire of the enemy's guns, the privates of each company electing by ballot the officers that were to command them. A singular exercise of suffrage was this, but there was a free ballot and a fair count, and a
terature and law, and arts, and arms, have they not found in her sons! Seven Governors of States—amongst them Crittenden, of Kentucky, and McDowell, Letcher, and Kemper, of Virginia; eleven United States Senators—amongst them Parker, of Virginia, Breckinridge, of Kentucky, H. S. Foote, of Mississippi, and William C. Preston, of South Carolina; more than a score of congressmen, twoscore and more of Judges—amongst them Trimble, of the United States Supreme Court; Coalter, Allen, Anderson, and Burks, of the Court of Appeals of Virginia; twelve or more college presidents, and amongst them Moses Hoge and Archibald Alexander, of Hampden-Sidney, James Priestly, of Cumberland College, Tennessee, and G. A. Baxter and Henry Ruffner (who presided here), and Socrates Maupin, of the University of Virginia. These are but a few of those who here garnered the learning that shed so gracious a light in the after-time on them, their country, and their Alma Mater. And could I pause to speak of those <
tasks with keenest weapons and brightest armor. What glowing names are these that shine on the rolls of the alumni of this honored Alma Mater! Church and State, Field and Forum, Bar and Bench, Hospital and Counting-Room, Lecture-Room and Pulpit—what famous champions and teachers of the right, what trusty workers and leaders in literature and law, and arts, and arms, have they not found in her sons! Seven Governors of States—amongst them Crittenden, of Kentucky, and McDowell, Letcher, and Kemper, of Virginia; eleven United States Senators—amongst them Parker, of Virginia, Breckinridge, of Kentucky, H. S. Foote, of Mississippi, and William C. Preston, of South Carolina; more than a score of congressmen, twoscore and more of Judges—amongst them Trimble, of the United States Supreme Court; Coalter, Allen, Anderson, and Burks, of the Court of Appeals of Virginia; twelve or more college presidents, and amongst them Moses Hoge and Archibald Alexander, of Hampden-Sidney, James Priestly,
George C. Meade (search for this): chapter 60
vent the fall of Washington—and a sixth commander has come to its head—General George C. Meade. Then follows the boldest and grandest assault of modern war— the c eyes. Returning to Virginia in martial trim and undismayed, and followed by Meade with that slow and gingerly step which is selfex-plaining, we next behold our G ever a great quality—firmness of mind in war. In September, while he confronts Meade along the Rapidan, he detaches the entire corps of Longstreet, and ere Meade isMeade is aware of this weakening of his opponent's forces, Longstreet is nine hundred miles away, striking a terrible blow at Chickamauga. The year 1863 passes by without other significant event in the story of the Army of Northern Virginia. Meade indeed, once in November, deployed his lines along Mine Run in seeming overtures of bapring, tramp, tramp, tramp, the boys are marching, and Grant (who had succeeded Meade), crossing the Rappahannock with 141,000 men, plunges boldly into the Wilderne
roll is beating. Less than a month has passed, and again the Army of Northern Virginia is in motion, and while Hooker is groping around to ascertain the whereabouts of his adversary, the next scence unfolds: General Early has planned and executed a flank march around Winchester, worthy of Stonewall Jackson,—the men of his division are mounting the parapets on June 14th, and capturing Milroy's guns. General Edward Johnston's division is pursuing Milroy's fugitives down the Valley pike. General Rodes has captured Martinsburg with 100 prisoners, and five cannon,—Ewell's corps is master of the Valley,—and by June 24th, the Army of Northern Virginia is in Pennsylvania, while for the third time the Army of the Potomac is glad if it can interpose to prevent the fall of Washington—and a sixth commander has come to its head—General George C. Meade. Then follows the boldest and grandest assault of modern war— the charge upon the Federal centre entrenched on the heights of Gettysburg
H. B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 60
forth and stormed and taken the outer entrenchments and camps of McClellan's army at Seven Pines, capturing ten pieces of artillery, six thosburg, he suddenly descends with Jackson on the right and rear of McClellan, and ere thirty days have passed since he assumed command, Richmo and the fields around her made immortal; and the broken ranks of McClellan are crouching for protection under the heavy guns of the iron-claSeptember the Confederates are in Maryland. In extreme exigency, McClellan is recalled to command the Army of the Potomac, but while Lee holed. Upon its eve Jackson has arrived fresh from Harper's Ferry. McClellan's repeated assaults on Lee were everywhere repulsed. He remainedo Virginia. The winter of 1862 comes, and Burnside, succeeding McClellan, assails Lee at Fredericksburg on December 13th, and is repulsed th expedition aimed directly at the Confederate Capital—McDowell, McClellan, Pope, Burnside, Hooker and now Grant,—all being disastrously rep
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...