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mbinations too powerful to be suppressed by the ordinary course of judicial proceedings. This proclamation determined Virginia's course. War had come. Her mediation had been in vain. She was too noble to be neutral. Of the arts of duplicity she knew nothing save to despise. She must now level her guns against the breasts of her Southern brethren, or make her own breast their shield. On April 17th Virginia answered Mr. Lincoln's proclamation with the Ordinance of Secession, and, like Pallas-Athene, the front fighter stepped with intrepid brow to where, in conflict, history has ever found her—to the front of war. Under which flag? Where now is Robert Lee? On the border line, between two hostile empires, girding their loins for as stern a fight as ever tested warriors' steel, he beholds each beckoning to him to lead its people to battle. On the one hand, Virginia, now in the fore-front of a scarcely organized revolution, summons him to share her lot in the perilous advent
Frederick Grant (search for this): chapter 60
ramp, tramp, tramp, the boys are marching, and Grant (who had succeeded Meade), crossing the Rappahell, McClellan, Pope, Burnside, Hooker and now Grant,—all being disastrously repulsed by the Army oving their repulse by the army led by Lee. But Grant in some sort, veiled his reverses by immediateaign of Lee from the Wilderness to Petersburg, Grant had lost no less than 70,000 men in reaching a000 men covering a line of thirty miles, while Grant, with more than three times that number, over rock of fate. On April 1st the left wing of Grant's massive lines swept around the right and read them in massive concentric lines the army of Grant, flushed with success and expectation—more thas best uniform, rides to the front to meet General Grant. For several days demands for surrender htled to demand. General, said Lee, addressing Grant, and opening the conversation, I deem it due thich I am determined to maintain to the last. Grant gave fitting and magnanimous response, and the[7 more...]<
t vaunts its freedom, for so doing, is a grievance, and a grief to every honorable Southern man. He himself is honored by this significant mark of hostile memory. He cannot suffer by the ignoble act. Only they who do it are deeply shamed. And that it is done, only shows the weakness of representatives who have not read the very title page in the book of human nature, and who, vainly conceiving that an insult to one man can be fruitful of any public good, only illustrate the saying of Madame de Stael, that the strongest of all antipathies is that of second-rate minds for a first-rate one, and that other maxim of Edmund Burke, that great empires and little minds go ill together. When Marc Antony, the great Triumvir of Rome, who conquered Egypt, was himself overthrown by Octavius Caesar, he gloried dying that he had conquered as a Roman, and was by a Roman nobly conquered. If the spirit of those brave soldiers of the Union, who, while the fields of battle were yet moist with blood,
ers and leaders in literature and law, and arts, and arms, have they not found in her sons! Seven Governors of States—amongst them Crittenden, of Kentucky, and McDowell, Letcher, and Kemper, of Virginia; eleven United States Senators—amongst them Parker, of Virginia, Breckinridge, of Kentucky, H. S. Foote, of Mississippi, and William C. Preston, of South Carolina; more than a score of congressmen, twoscore and more of Judges—amongst them Trimble, of the United States Supreme Court; Coalter, Allen, Anderson, and Burks, of the Court of Appeals of Virginia; twelve or more college presidents, and amongst them Moses Hoge and Archibald Alexander, of Hampden-Sidney, James Priestly, of Cumberland College, Tennessee, and G. A. Baxter and Henry Ruffner (who presided here), and Socrates Maupin, of the University of Virginia. These are but a few of those who here garnered the learning that shed so gracious a light in the after-time on them, their country, and their Alma Mater. And could I pau<
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 60
es and Gentlemen: The sickness of General Joseph E. Johnston, the distinguished President of the he death of General Breckinridge General Joseph E. Johnston, the senior surviving officer of the Conad sensibly declined. The fall of General Joseph E. Johnston and the Oppor-Tunity of Lee. Meane in history under its famous commander, Joseph E. Johnston, and I cannot speak that name without boment. Still later in the progress of events, Johnston had exhibited again his strategic skill in hoo parallel in history. The great body of General Johnston's army had reorganized itself under the ls of brute force. Still later on, May 31st, Johnston had sallied forth and stormed and taken the oed, and glory had exacted costly tribute, for Johnston himself had fallen, terribly wounded. The hend fighting ground in the Carolinas with Joseph E. Johnston, who, amongst the first to meet the foe,, and from Manassas to Appomattox, under Joseph E. Johnston, and Thomas J. Jackson, and Robert E. Le
Edward Virginius Valentine (search for this): chapter 60
Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. Remarks of General Early—oration of Major John W. Daniel, Ll.D., of Va.—description of the ceremonies, &c. The occasion of the unveiling of Valentine's superb figure of Lee, was one of extraordinary interest, and deserves a place in our records. General J. A. Early, First Vice-President of the Lee Memorial Association, presided on the occasion, called the vast assemblage to order, and called on thValentine's superb figure of Lee, was one of extraordinary interest, and deserves a place in our records. General J. A. Early, First Vice-President of the Lee Memorial Association, presided on the occasion, called the vast assemblage to order, and called on the Rev. R. J. McBryde, of Lexington, who made an appropriate and fervent prayer. General Early then made the following Introductory remarks. Friends, Comrades and Fellow-Citizens, Ladies and Gentlemen: The sickness of General Joseph E. Johnston, the distinguished President of the Lee Memorial Association, which prevents his attendance here, has devolved on me, as First Vice-President, the unexpected duty of presiding on this occasion; and I am sure no one can regret the cause of
G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 60
had sensibly declined. The fall of General Joseph E. Johnston and the Oppor-Tunity of Lee. Meanwhile the Army of Northern Virginia had made a name in history under its famous commander, Joseph E. Johnston, and I cannot speak that name without bowing the homage of my heart to the illustrious soldier and noble gentleman who bears it. Under his sagacious and brilliant leadership, his forces had been suddenly withdrawn from Patterson's front near Winchester, and united with those of General Beauregard at Manassas; and there, led by those two Generals, the joint command had, on July 21st, 1861, routed the Army of the Potomac in the first pitched battle of the war; had given earnest of what the volunteers of the South could do in action, and had crowned the new-born Confederacy with the glory of splendid military achievement. Still later in the progress of events, Johnston had exhibited again his strategic skill in holding Mc-Clellan at bay on the lines of Yorktown, with a force so s
J. Longstreet (search for this): chapter 60
spring in 1863, a replenished army with a fresh commander, Fighting Joe Hooker, renews the onset by way of Chancellorsville, and finds Lee with two divisions of Longstreet's corps absent in Southeast Virginia. But slender as are his numbers, Lee is ever aggressive; and while Hooker with the finest army on the planet, as he styledonfidence which bespeaks ever a great quality—firmness of mind in war. In September, while he confronts Meade along the Rapidan, he detaches the entire corps of Longstreet, and ere Meade is aware of this weakening of his opponent's forces, Longstreet is nine hundred miles away, striking a terrible blow at Chickamauga. The year Longstreet is nine hundred miles away, striking a terrible blow at Chickamauga. The year 1863 passes by without other significant event in the story of the Army of Northern Virginia. Meade indeed, once in November, deployed his lines along Mine Run in seeming overtures of battle, but quickly concluding that discretion was the better part of valor, he marched back across the Rappahannock, content with his observations
Joe Hooker (search for this): chapter 60
hter. 1863—Chancellorsville. With the dawn of spring in 1863, a replenished army with a fresh commander, Fighting Joe Hooker, renews the onset by way of Chancellorsville, and finds Lee with two divisions of Longstreet's corps absent in Southeast Virginia. But slender as are his numbers, Lee is ever aggressive; and while Hooker with the finest army on the planet, as he styled it, is confronting Lee near Chancellorsville, and Early is holding Sedgwick at bay at Fredericksburg, Jackson, who, the long roll is beating. Less than a month has passed, and again the Army of Northern Virginia is in motion, and while Hooker is groping around to ascertain the whereabouts of his adversary, the next scence unfolds: General Early has planned and eor practically closed the sixth expedition aimed directly at the Confederate Capital—McDowell, McClellan, Pope, Burnside, Hooker and now Grant,—all being disastrously repulsed by the Army of Northern Virginia, and all but the first receiving their re<
John C. Breckinridge (search for this): chapter 60
ves, were incorporated by the name and style of The Lee Memorial Association. Subsequently the Association was further organized by the appointment of General John C. Breckinridge, of Kentucky, who had been the last Secretary of War of the Confederate States, as President, and of fifteen VicePresi-dents, as also a Treasurer—the nexecute in marble the recumbent figure, and years ago he completed his work in a manner that links his name forever with that of Lee. Upon the death of General Breckinridge General Joseph E. Johnston, the senior surviving officer of the Confederate army, and the predecessor of General Lee in command of that army, which, under of States—amongst them Crittenden, of Kentucky, and McDowell, Letcher, and Kemper, of Virginia; eleven United States Senators—amongst them Parker, of Virginia, Breckinridge, of Kentucky, H. S. Foote, of Mississippi, and William C. Preston, of South Carolina; more than a score of congressmen, twoscore and more of Judges—amongst th
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