hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
ZZZ 776 0 Browse Search
Robert Edward Lee 215 31 Browse Search
United States (United States) 194 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 193 5 Browse Search
Robert Lee 180 0 Browse Search
Robert E. Lee 172 0 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 164 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 126 0 Browse Search
Georgia (Georgia, United States) 108 0 Browse Search
Savannah (Georgia, United States) 100 8 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 758 total hits in 247 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.12
ssion. Soon after it became known that Mr. Lincoln had been elected, the cotton States, consisting of South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas, took measures to secede from the Union, treating his election as a opposition among the people, it was not submitted to them, but took effect by the action of the convention alone. In Georgia a strong minority opposed the measure to the last, and a test resolution, declaring it to be the right and duty of GeorgGeorgia to secede, passed the convention on the 18th of January, 1861, by a vote of only 165 to 130, and, after the adoption of this resolution, the ordinance of secession was opposed the next day by 89 members against 208 voting in favor of it. In Al have been for some time past and now are opposed and the execution thereof obstructed in the States of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas by combinations too powerful to be suppressed by the ordinary cours
Orange, N. J. (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.12
to maintain popular government, and to avenge wrongs. All these things I do in obedience to a popular demand, and I now require your submission and support. I think it is impossible to recognize in this picture of absolutism a trace of American constitutional government. I do not think that an attempt has been made to assert such powers over men of English speech and English blood since Charles the First passed from the royal banqueting hall to death. Certainly not since William of Orange landed at Torbay. The President of the United States assumed absolute power in compliance with a popular demand, and called for an army to do what that popular demand required. Among the things to be done was one which the Supreme Court had declared that the Government of the United States had no power to do, and another was something which, under all free governments, is left to the civil magistrate and not to the soldier—to avenge wrongs. All who lived during those exciting times
Torbay (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 1.12
lar government, and to avenge wrongs. All these things I do in obedience to a popular demand, and I now require your submission and support. I think it is impossible to recognize in this picture of absolutism a trace of American constitutional government. I do not think that an attempt has been made to assert such powers over men of English speech and English blood since Charles the First passed from the royal banqueting hall to death. Certainly not since William of Orange landed at Torbay. The President of the United States assumed absolute power in compliance with a popular demand, and called for an army to do what that popular demand required. Among the things to be done was one which the Supreme Court had declared that the Government of the United States had no power to do, and another was something which, under all free governments, is left to the civil magistrate and not to the soldier—to avenge wrongs. All who lived during those exciting times will bear witness
Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.12
ugh for all the purposes of a good and wise government. To carry out any plan of pacification based upon these principles, the border slave States were ready to give the Federal government the support of more than two-thirds of the votes of the whole South, and from the time Mr. Lincoln was elected, in November, 1860, the people of these States did not cease to urge upon the Federal authorities the policy of peace. While affairs were in this critical state, the sound of the guns in Charleston harbor broke upon the ears of the anxious friends of the Union like the voice of doom. It matters not, for my present purpose, upon whom rests the responsibility of that act. We are concerned only with its effect upon the government at Washington, to which all eyes were now anxiously directed. Before the smoke had rolled away from Sumter, the answer to the guns of its assailants was delivered in the proclamation of Mr. Lincoln of April 15, 1861. Let me read that momentous document, b
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.12
n command of that post showed that its loss was due in a great measure to the supposed persistent disregard by the Secretary of his urgent requisitions for powder and other supplies. Mr. Benjamin had directed General Huger to send powder from Norfolk to the garrison at Roanoke Island, and had been informed by Huger that compliance with that order would leave Norfolk without ammunition. The report of the commanding officer at Roanoke Island led to an investigation of the loss of the post by Norfolk without ammunition. The report of the commanding officer at Roanoke Island led to an investigation of the loss of the post by a committee of Congress, and I give you the result in the language of Mr. Benjamin: I consulted the President, he says, whether it was best for the country that I should submit to unmerited censure or reveal to a congressional committee our poverty, and my utter inability to supply the requisitions of General Wise, and thus run the risk that the fact should become known to some of the spies of the enemy, of whose activity we were well assured. It was thought best for the public interest
West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.12
tes to join in the struggle for the liberty of his State. Without entering into politics, I deem it my duty to say one word in reference to this charge. Virginian born, descended from a family illustrious in the colonial history of Virginia, more illustrious still in her struggle for independence, and most illustrious in her recent effort to maintain the great principles declared in 1776; given by Virginia to the service of the United States, he represented her in the Military Academy at West Point. He was not educated by the Federal Government, but by Virginia; for she paid her full share for the support of that institution, and was entitled to demand in return the services of her sons. Entering the army of the United States, he represented Virginia there also, and nobly performed his duty for the Union, of which Virginia was a member, whether we look to his peaceful services as an engineer, or to his more notable deeds upon foreign fields of battle. He came from Mexico crowned w
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.12
blic. The clamor which then arose followed him when he went to South Carolina, so that it became necessary to write a letter to the Governor Mr. Lincoln had been elected, the cotton States, consisting of South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas, reating his election as a sufficient cause for their action. South Carolina led the way on the 17th of December, 1860, and was followed by ger because it did not set forth the causes of the secession of South Carolina correctly. He said: In the declaration not one word is saidthe popular opposition. How the ordinance was adopted. In South Carolina the ordinance was adopted unanimously by the convention, and wh opposed and the execution thereof obstructed in the States of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas bton, and spoke of the enthusiastic love which the people of the South Carolina bore for Lee. General Early took occasion to correct Colonel
I. R. Trimble (search for this): chapter 1.12
d late fellow-soldier, Jubal A. Early. Lynchburg, Va., October 24, 1870. Pursuant to this call there assembled at the First Presbyteriar Church, in Richmond, on Thursday evening, November 3d, 1870, the grandest gathering of Confederate soldiers which had met since the war. This church then stood upon the upper portion of the site now occupied by our imposing City Hall. Among the leading officers who participated in the meeting were Generals Early, John B. Gordon, Edward Johnson, I. R. Trimble, W. B. Taliaferro, William Smith, W. N. Pendleton, Fitz. Lee, M. Ransom, William Terry, Benjamin Huger, Robert Ransom, L. L. Lomax, George H. Steuart, C. W. Field, W. S. Walker, B. T. Johnson, J. D. Imboden, R. L. Walker, Harry Heth, Samuel Jones, John S. Preston, Henry A. Wise, George E. Pickett, D. H. Maury, M. D. Corse, J. H. Lane, James L. Kemper, J. A. Walker, and others; Colonels Thomas H. Carter, Hilary P. Jones, Thomas L. Preston, Robert S. Preston, William Allan, William Preston
Thomas H. Carter (search for this): chapter 1.12
fficers who participated in the meeting were Generals Early, John B. Gordon, Edward Johnson, I. R. Trimble, W. B. Taliaferro, William Smith, W. N. Pendleton, Fitz. Lee, M. Ransom, William Terry, Benjamin Huger, Robert Ransom, L. L. Lomax, George H. Steuart, C. W. Field, W. S. Walker, B. T. Johnson, J. D. Imboden, R. L. Walker, Harry Heth, Samuel Jones, John S. Preston, Henry A. Wise, George E. Pickett, D. H. Maury, M. D. Corse, J. H. Lane, James L. Kemper, J. A. Walker, and others; Colonels Thomas H. Carter, Hilary P. Jones, Thomas L. Preston, Robert S. Preston, William Allan, William Preston Johnston, Charles S. Venable, Charles Marshall, Walter H. Taylor, Henry E. Peyton, and Robert E. Withers; Commodore M. F. Maury, Captain R. D. Minor, of the Confederate States Navy, and scores of others of our leading officers, and hosts of the ragged veterans of the rank and file. The meeting was called to order by General Bradley T. Johnson, General Jubal A. Early was appointed temporary cha
Charles W. Field (search for this): chapter 1.12
n Thursday evening, November 3d, 1870, the grandest gathering of Confederate soldiers which had met since the war. This church then stood upon the upper portion of the site now occupied by our imposing City Hall. Among the leading officers who participated in the meeting were Generals Early, John B. Gordon, Edward Johnson, I. R. Trimble, W. B. Taliaferro, William Smith, W. N. Pendleton, Fitz. Lee, M. Ransom, William Terry, Benjamin Huger, Robert Ransom, L. L. Lomax, George H. Steuart, C. W. Field, W. S. Walker, B. T. Johnson, J. D. Imboden, R. L. Walker, Harry Heth, Samuel Jones, John S. Preston, Henry A. Wise, George E. Pickett, D. H. Maury, M. D. Corse, J. H. Lane, James L. Kemper, J. A. Walker, and others; Colonels Thomas H. Carter, Hilary P. Jones, Thomas L. Preston, Robert S. Preston, William Allan, William Preston Johnston, Charles S. Venable, Charles Marshall, Walter H. Taylor, Henry E. Peyton, and Robert E. Withers; Commodore M. F. Maury, Captain R. D. Minor, of the Confed
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...