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George W. Randolph (search for this): chapter 1.12
ect funds for the purpose throughout the South. The organization was constituted as follows: President, Mrs. William H. Macfarland; vice-presidents, Mrs. George W. Randolph, Mrs. James Lyons, Mrs. William Brown; treasurer, Miss Elizabeth Byrd Nicholas; secretary, Miss Sarah Nicholas Randolph. Despite the prevailing povertyand Hebrew, make their contributions for this object. It is hoped the requisite amount will be secured at once. (Signed) Mrs. William H. Macfarland, Mrs. George W. Randolph, Mrs. James Lyons, Mrs. William Brown and Miss E. B. Nicholas. The next day, and of the same materials, was formed the Association of the Army of Nortn ($3,000) coming from Savannah. At the foot of the copy of the circular in the possession of General Early, the following is appended in the handwriting of Miss Randolph: The fourth Sunday (27th) has been appointed as the day on which the collection for the monument will be taken up. Please advertise as far as you can. Re
I. Q. A. Ward (search for this): chapter 1.12
e congressional committee. A plaster cast of it was ultimately sent to M. Mercie, and, of course, was invaluable in getting the shape and proportions of the General's head. Awarding the prizes. The models obtained, the next step was to select a suitable committee to award prizes, and its importance was fully realized. It was finally decided that no amateur should be on it, and consequently the choice fell upon two of America's most distinguished sculptors, Messrs. St. Gaudens and I. Q. A. Ward. Mr. Clarke, the government architect, was associated with them. These gentlemen were asked and kindly agreed to perform the delicate task. It was soon apparent that the high prizes offered had done their work, and the judges confirmed this opinion by saying that it was, perhaps, the best competitive exhibition ever held in America. The first prize was awarded to Mr. Niehaus, of Ohio, and the second to Mr. Ezekiel. The Ladies' Association had not bound itself to give the work to the
Frank Huger (search for this): chapter 1.12
The report of the officer in command of that post showed that its loss was due in a great measure to the supposed persistent disregard by the Secretary of his urgent requisitions for powder and other supplies. Mr. Benjamin had directed General Huger to send powder from Norfolk to the garrison at Roanoke Island, and had been informed by Huger that compliance with that order would leave Norfolk without ammunition. The report of the commanding officer at Roanoke Island led to an investigatHuger that compliance with that order would leave Norfolk without ammunition. The report of the commanding officer at Roanoke Island led to an investigation of the loss of the post by a committee of Congress, and I give you the result in the language of Mr. Benjamin: I consulted the President, he says, whether it was best for the country that I should submit to unmerited censure or reveal to a congressional committee our poverty, and my utter inability to supply the requisitions of General Wise, and thus run the risk that the fact should become known to some of the spies of the enemy, of whose activity we were well assured. It was though
W. S. Walker (search for this): chapter 1.12
ening, November 3d, 1870, the grandest gathering of Confederate soldiers which had met since the war. This church then stood upon the upper portion of the site now occupied by our imposing City Hall. Among the leading officers who participated in the meeting were Generals Early, John B. Gordon, Edward Johnson, I. R. Trimble, W. B. Taliaferro, William Smith, W. N. Pendleton, Fitz. Lee, M. Ransom, William Terry, Benjamin Huger, Robert Ransom, L. L. Lomax, George H. Steuart, C. W. Field, W. S. Walker, B. T. Johnson, J. D. Imboden, R. L. Walker, Harry Heth, Samuel Jones, John S. Preston, Henry A. Wise, George E. Pickett, D. H. Maury, M. D. Corse, J. H. Lane, James L. Kemper, J. A. Walker, and others; Colonels Thomas H. Carter, Hilary P. Jones, Thomas L. Preston, Robert S. Preston, William Allan, William Preston Johnston, Charles S. Venable, Charles Marshall, Walter H. Taylor, Henry E. Peyton, and Robert E. Withers; Commodore M. F. Maury, Captain R. D. Minor, of the Confederate States N
R. D. Minor (search for this): chapter 1.12
George H. Steuart, C. W. Field, W. S. Walker, B. T. Johnson, J. D. Imboden, R. L. Walker, Harry Heth, Samuel Jones, John S. Preston, Henry A. Wise, George E. Pickett, D. H. Maury, M. D. Corse, J. H. Lane, James L. Kemper, J. A. Walker, and others; Colonels Thomas H. Carter, Hilary P. Jones, Thomas L. Preston, Robert S. Preston, William Allan, William Preston Johnston, Charles S. Venable, Charles Marshall, Walter H. Taylor, Henry E. Peyton, and Robert E. Withers; Commodore M. F. Maury, Captain R. D. Minor, of the Confederate States Navy, and scores of others of our leading officers, and hosts of the ragged veterans of the rank and file. The meeting was called to order by General Bradley T. Johnson, General Jubal A. Early was appointed temporary chairman, and Captain Campbell Lawson and Sergeant George L. Christian, of Richmond, and Captain George Walker, of Westmoreland county, temporary secretaries. Ex-President Jefferson Davis was made permanent chairman. General Early, on t
Dabney H. Maury (search for this): chapter 1.12
pper portion of the site now occupied by our imposing City Hall. Among the leading officers who participated in the meeting were Generals Early, John B. Gordon, Edward Johnson, I. R. Trimble, W. B. Taliaferro, William Smith, W. N. Pendleton, Fitz. Lee, M. Ransom, William Terry, Benjamin Huger, Robert Ransom, L. L. Lomax, George H. Steuart, C. W. Field, W. S. Walker, B. T. Johnson, J. D. Imboden, R. L. Walker, Harry Heth, Samuel Jones, John S. Preston, Henry A. Wise, George E. Pickett, D. H. Maury, M. D. Corse, J. H. Lane, James L. Kemper, J. A. Walker, and others; Colonels Thomas H. Carter, Hilary P. Jones, Thomas L. Preston, Robert S. Preston, William Allan, William Preston Johnston, Charles S. Venable, Charles Marshall, Walter H. Taylor, Henry E. Peyton, and Robert E. Withers; Commodore M. F. Maury, Captain R. D. Minor, of the Confederate States Navy, and scores of others of our leading officers, and hosts of the ragged veterans of the rank and file. The meeting was called to
Charles S. Venable (search for this): chapter 1.12
n, Henry A. Wise, George E. Pickett, D. H. Maury, M. D. Corse, J. H. Lane, James L. Kemper, J. A. Walker, and others; Colonels Thomas H. Carter, Hilary P. Jones, Thomas L. Preston, Robert S. Preston, William Allan, William Preston Johnston, Charles S. Venable, Charles Marshall, Walter H. Taylor, Henry E. Peyton, and Robert E. Withers; Commodore M. F. Maury, Captain R. D. Minor, of the Confederate States Navy, and scores of others of our leading officers, and hosts of the ragged veterans of the rs will be remembered, and when the monument we build shall have crumbled into dust, his virtues will live, a high model for the imitation of generations yet unborn. Other addresses. Mr. Davis was followed in eloquent addresses by Colonel Charles S. Venable, General John S. Preston, General John B. Gordon, Colonel Charles Marshall, General Henry A. Wise, Colonel William Preston Johnston, and Colonel Robert E. Withers. Resolutions were then passed organizing an association to erect a mon
Samuel Jones (search for this): chapter 1.12
rs which had met since the war. This church then stood upon the upper portion of the site now occupied by our imposing City Hall. Among the leading officers who participated in the meeting were Generals Early, John B. Gordon, Edward Johnson, I. R. Trimble, W. B. Taliaferro, William Smith, W. N. Pendleton, Fitz. Lee, M. Ransom, William Terry, Benjamin Huger, Robert Ransom, L. L. Lomax, George H. Steuart, C. W. Field, W. S. Walker, B. T. Johnson, J. D. Imboden, R. L. Walker, Harry Heth, Samuel Jones, John S. Preston, Henry A. Wise, George E. Pickett, D. H. Maury, M. D. Corse, J. H. Lane, James L. Kemper, J. A. Walker, and others; Colonels Thomas H. Carter, Hilary P. Jones, Thomas L. Preston, Robert S. Preston, William Allan, William Preston Johnston, Charles S. Venable, Charles Marshall, Walter H. Taylor, Henry E. Peyton, and Robert E. Withers; Commodore M. F. Maury, Captain R. D. Minor, of the Confederate States Navy, and scores of others of our leading officers, and hosts of the ra
John E. Davis (search for this): chapter 1.12
n the midst of battle. It showed what a heart he had for them. I did not want his life to appear without notice of it, for I cannot forget it. These are the facts of the case. You may put them in what shape you wish. Yours respectfully, John E. Davis. Hunt's Station, Knox county, O. I think this story worthy of a place beside that of Sir Philip Sidney and the wounded soldier. Sir Philip showed mercy, but here is the blessed union of mercy and justice on the battle-field. There is o hope. Colonel Marshall's able speech was listened to with profound attention, and was frequently and loudly applauded, while his allusions to General Early as the last to secede, his tribute to the military genius of Lee, his tribute to President Davis, some of the incidents which he related, and his peroration, elicited enthusiastic applause and cheers. General Hampton. In response to loud and persistent calls General Hampton came forward, was greeted with loud cheers, and made a fe
n from Elder's portrait in the Corcoran Gallery. Through the kindness of General Custis Lee, photographs of the General's saddle and sword were sent to the artists. uff, that the models might be seen to the best advantage. Death mask of General Lee. It should be noted that a foreign artist in writing about his model for the statue, asked for the death mask of General Lee. Miss Randolph could find no trace of such a cast, and General Custis Lee was confident that no such mask had beGeneral Custis Lee was confident that no such mask had been made. This seemed to settle the question. In selecting a commission to sit in judgment on the models, and to award the prizes, some gentlemen in Washington beingrke Mills as a suitable judge, and remarked that he had his father's mask of General Lee. With this clue, Miss Randolph wrote to Dr. Barbaim, who purchased the maskill had the world before them where to choose, with this advantage added. Governor Lee's work. In the meantime General Fitzhugh Lee was inaugurated Governor of
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