hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Stonewall Jackson 345 1 Browse Search
Joseph E. Johnston 292 10 Browse Search
John L. Porter 152 4 Browse Search
United States (United States) 138 0 Browse Search
Robert E. Lee 128 0 Browse Search
Robert Edward Lee 126 20 Browse Search
John M. Brooke 122 6 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 109 1 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 101 1 Browse Search
Sherman 100 4 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 70 total hits in 35 results.

1 2 3 4
John Marshall (search for this): chapter 1.6
boys in the battle. Account of Captain J. W. Lewis. [times, October 11, 1891] My attention has been called to the account of that glorious battle of 24th June, 1864, at Staunton bridge. I am glad that General D. H. Maury and Major John B. McPhail have given so interesting an account of it. But you will see that both accounts only refer to the fight on the lower or eastern side of the bridge. We had six pieces of artillery, four on the lower side of the bridge, commanded by Captain Marshall and Lieutenant Bob Ragland. The two on the upper or western side of the bridge Major Farinholt, who commanded the guard stationed there, gave to me, I being captain of artillery. The two guns were stationed one hundred yards above the bridge. When I took command of these guns and examined the amunition I found that we had only solid shot and canister. The upper side of the bridge. We at once covered the works with green bushes. General Wilson threw his troops on both sides of
r in the neighborhood, and Dr. Sutphin, a prominent physician of Halifax county—and only several severely wounded. I have not heard their dead estimated at less than sixty. Many, if not all of their dead, were buried where they fell upon the river flats. Subsequent freshets have exhumed and scattered their bones over the land. An incident. I will close my letter with an incident just related to me by my brother, which may throw some light upon the matter. In the spring or summer of 1865, while General Benham with his engineer corps was engaged in rebuilding Staunton-river bridge, he had a visit from a Colonel Fitzhugh, who commanded the assaulting force, the object of his visit being an inspection of the scene of battle. My brother being on courteous relations with the General was sent for to be questioned by Colonel Fitzhugh in regard to the strength of the Confederate garrison. When he replied that the force engaged in repelling the attack amounted to not more than two h
June 24th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 1.6
red to as bringing in reinforcements. Regretting my inability, &c., &c., I am, yours very truly, (Signed) John B. Mcphail, Late a Major Confederate Army. Major Robert L. Ragland, East Boston; Captain John Lewis, Milton, N. C.; Captain William B. Bruce, Staunton, Va.; and Captain John H. Powell, commanded a company of boys in the battle. Account of Captain J. W. Lewis. [times, October 11, 1891] My attention has been called to the account of that glorious battle of 24th June, 1864, at Staunton bridge. I am glad that General D. H. Maury and Major John B. McPhail have given so interesting an account of it. But you will see that both accounts only refer to the fight on the lower or eastern side of the bridge. We had six pieces of artillery, four on the lower side of the bridge, commanded by Captain Marshall and Lieutenant Bob Ragland. The two on the upper or western side of the bridge Major Farinholt, who commanded the guard stationed there, gave to me, I being ca
August 24th, 1891 AD (search for this): chapter 1.6
Another account of the fight. The following letter gives another account of this remarkable battle: Randolph, Charlotte county, Va., Aug. 24, 1891. General D. H. Maury: My Dear General: * * * My brother, then under eighteen years of age was engaged in the battle. He assures me that there were in the fort not more than between four and five hundred men and boys—men over forty-five from the surrounding counties, and a few army men and officers on furlough; that of this number not more than two hundred and and fifty, under command of Coleman, were engaged in the fight in repelling the Federal assault upon the bridge; that only two Confederates were killed, viz.: The Rev. Mr. Burke, an Episcopal minister in the neighborhood, and Dr. Sutphin, a prominent physician of Halifax county—and only several severely wounded. I have not heard their dead estimated at less than sixty. Many, if not all of their dead, were buried where they fell upon the river flats. Subsequent freshets
October 11th, 1891 AD (search for this): chapter 1.6
n the repulse he had met and the frequent rattling of an empty train of cars which she had referred to as bringing in reinforcements. Regretting my inability, &c., &c., I am, yours very truly, (Signed) John B. Mcphail, Late a Major Confederate Army. Major Robert L. Ragland, East Boston; Captain John Lewis, Milton, N. C.; Captain William B. Bruce, Staunton, Va.; and Captain John H. Powell, commanded a company of boys in the battle. Account of Captain J. W. Lewis. [times, October 11, 1891] My attention has been called to the account of that glorious battle of 24th June, 1864, at Staunton bridge. I am glad that General D. H. Maury and Major John B. McPhail have given so interesting an account of it. But you will see that both accounts only refer to the fight on the lower or eastern side of the bridge. We had six pieces of artillery, four on the lower side of the bridge, commanded by Captain Marshall and Lieutenant Bob Ragland. The two on the upper or western sid
1 2 3 4