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e, which at first they seemed to discredit. Finally they approached, and I was told by the officer in command that Colonel Manigault, who was commanding ashore, had directed that if it was a Confederate vessel I should hoist another flag under the that I needed a pilot. He readily and very quickly pulled ashore and returned with one, bringing me a message from Colonel Manigault that I could place implicit confidence in him, to let him take the ship up to Georgetown, and requested me to come afloat by me, was placed in charge of this pilot and steamed up to Georgetown. I went ashore and was received by Colonel Manigault, of the South Carolina forces, with a hearty welcome and with cheers from his troops. Colonel Manigault inquired wColonel Manigault inquired whether I had seen the blockaders off Georgetown. I replied that I had seen their smoke going off up the coast; whereupon he informed me that this was the first day for many weeks that they had absented themselves from their post in front of the ha
William H. Murray (search for this): chapter 1.21
lockade. That purpose was accordingly abandoned. Captain R. B. Pegram, then in command of the Nashville, fitted her with two small guns and made her ready for sea, with a full crew of officers and men. The following is a list of her officers: Captain, R. B. Pegram; First Lieutenant, Charles M. Fauntleroy; Second Lieutenant, John W. Bennett; Third Lieutenant, William C. Whittle; Master, John H. Ingram; Surgeon, John L. Ancrum; Paymaster, Richard Taylor; Chief Engineer, James Hood; Assistant Murray and two others, and the following midshipmen: W. R. Dalton, William H. Sinclair, Clarence Cary, J. W. Pegram, W. P. Hamilton, ——Thomas, and ——McClintock. On the night of October 21, 1861, she ran out of Charleston and touched at Bermuda. After stopping there a few days for coal, she headed across the Atlantic, and on November 19th captured in the entrance of the British channel the ship Harvey Birch, an American merchantman in command of Captain Nelson. She was boarded by an officer an
Stephen R. Mallory (search for this): chapter 1.21
up to Georgetown. I went ashore and was received by Colonel Manigault, of the South Carolina forces, with a hearty welcome and with cheers from his troops. Colonel Manigault inquired whether I had seen the blockaders off Georgetown. I replied that I had seen their smoke going off up the coast; whereupon he informed me that this was the first day for many weeks that they had absented themselves from their post in front of the harbor. I proceeded at once to Richmond and reported to S. R. Mallory, Secretary of the Navy, who directed me to return to Charleston and confer with Messrs. Fraser, Trenholm & Co., the purchasers of the vessel, and to take all necessary steps to effect her transfer to them as speedily as possible. I went to Charleston, and in concert with them or their agents, the business was closed, they giving the command of the ship, at my request, to Captain Gooding. Being unable to carry out any cargo on account of the bar, she sailed in ballast, having taken on c
John H. Ingram (search for this): chapter 1.21
bout twelve or fourteen hundred tons, and was therefore deemed by them too large a vessel to run the blockade. That purpose was accordingly abandoned. Captain R. B. Pegram, then in command of the Nashville, fitted her with two small guns and made her ready for sea, with a full crew of officers and men. The following is a list of her officers: Captain, R. B. Pegram; First Lieutenant, Charles M. Fauntleroy; Second Lieutenant, John W. Bennett; Third Lieutenant, William C. Whittle; Master, John H. Ingram; Surgeon, John L. Ancrum; Paymaster, Richard Taylor; Chief Engineer, James Hood; Assistant Murray and two others, and the following midshipmen: W. R. Dalton, William H. Sinclair, Clarence Cary, J. W. Pegram, W. P. Hamilton, ——Thomas, and ——McClintock. On the night of October 21, 1861, she ran out of Charleston and touched at Bermuda. After stopping there a few days for coal, she headed across the Atlantic, and on November 19th captured in the entrance of the British channel the ship
th a hearty welcome and with cheers from his troops. Colonel Manigault inquired whether I had seen the blockaders off Georgetown. I replied that I had seen their smoke going off up the coast; whereupon he informed me that this was the first day for many weeks that they had absented themselves from their post in front of the harbor. I proceeded at once to Richmond and reported to S. R. Mallory, Secretary of the Navy, who directed me to return to Charleston and confer with Messrs. Fraser, Trenholm & Co., the purchasers of the vessel, and to take all necessary steps to effect her transfer to them as speedily as possible. I went to Charleston, and in concert with them or their agents, the business was closed, they giving the command of the ship, at my request, to Captain Gooding. Being unable to carry out any cargo on account of the bar, she sailed in ballast, having taken on coal and such crew as could be secured for her. She left Georgetown in the broad light of day, flying the Con
y; Second Lieutenant, John W. Bennett; Third Lieutenant, William C. Whittle; Master, John H. Ingram; Surgeon, John L. Ancrum; Paymaster, Richard Taylor; Chief Engineer, James Hood; Assistant Murray and two others, and the following midshipmen: W. R. Dalton, William H. Sinclair, Clarence Cary, J. W. Pegram, W. P. Hamilton, ——Thomasuments, from the vessel, was promptly executed, and the ship was left under my command with two midshipman, Messrs. Sinclair and Hamilton, Boatswain Sawyer, Chief Engineer Hood, three sailors, four firemen, cook and steward, to be kept in order until taken possession of by the agent of the purchasers. General Burnside's movementtion of time, and a very short time at that; the blockade must, therefore, be broken. Quietly and secretly we set to work, and being assured by my chief engineer (Hood) that with his small force and assistance of the deck hands he could keep the vessel under steam, we made ready to run through the blockading fleet. I was fortuna
r at Morehead City on the 28th day of February, 1862. Captain Pegram, after visiting Richmond and reporting to the Navy Department for instructions, returned to the ship, bringing information that the Nashville had been sold to private parties in Charleston. The order to remove all Confederate States property, including armament, charts, and instruments, from the vessel, was promptly executed, and the ship was left under my command with two midshipman, Messrs. Sinclair and Hamilton, Boatswain Sawyer, Chief Engineer Hood, three sailors, four firemen, cook and steward, to be kept in order until taken possession of by the agent of the purchasers. General Burnside's movement upon Newbern, N. C., was then being executed, and Captain Pegram, with the officers and crew of the Nashville, went through on one of the last trains that could escape, after which all communication inland was completely cut off. Burnside's expedition was moving upon Morehead City, and the capture of the Nashvil
before dawn of the 19th, we discovered their position by the great number of rockets which they were sending up to signal the fact that our presence was known. This, together with the fact that the stone fleet had been sunk in the channel, leaving only the Maffits channel open, and not knowing how far even that was obstructed, made me conclude not to attempt to run in. With an exhausted crew and short of coal, I put back and ran clear of the blockaders. At daylight on the 19th I made Captain Roman, steaming close in to land, and tracked up the beach, intending to try to enter Georgetown, S. C., but seeing the smoke of two steamers to the northward, I stopped the engines and made ready to destroy the vessel on their approach, as we were in a condition too exhausted to run successfully. Among Confederates. Fortunately the smoke of the blockaders disappeared on the horizon, and we steamed up to the entrance of Georgetown, but on going in we got aground on the bar. Sending out a
stance of the deck hands he could keep the vessel under steam, we made ready to run through the blockading fleet. I was fortunate in securing the services of Captain Gooding, an excellent coast pilot, who was then in command of the sailing ship blockaded in the harbor. He brought with him a chart, chronometer and sextant, and sucle in the ship's bottom, as I knew we would strike on going over the bar. We were going at full speed, say fourteen knots per hour. I was in the pilot house with Gooding, and two others were at the wheel. The blockaders, under way and broadside to me, were across my path. I ran for the one furtherest to the northward and eastwar as possible. I went to Charleston, and in concert with them or their agents, the business was closed, they giving the command of the ship, at my request, to Captain Gooding. Being unable to carry out any cargo on account of the bar, she sailed in ballast, having taken on coal and such crew as could be secured for her. She left G
John Slidell (search for this): chapter 1.21
Cruise of the C. S. Steamer Nashville. [from the Richmond, Va., dispatch, March 18, 1901.1 By Lieutenant W. C. Whittle, C. S. N. In 1861 the Nashville, then used as a freight and passenger steamer, was seized in the port of Charleston, S. C., by the Confederate authorities, and soon fitted out for the purpose of taking Messrs. Mason and Slidell to Europe. She was a side-wheel, brigrigged steamer, of about twelve or fourteen hundred tons, and was therefore deemed by them too large a vessel to run the blockade. That purpose was accordingly abandoned. Captain R. B. Pegram, then in command of the Nashville, fitted her with two small guns and made her ready for sea, with a full crew of officers and men. The following is a list of her officers: Captain, R. B. Pegram; First Lieutenant, Charles M. Fauntleroy; Second Lieutenant, John W. Bennett; Third Lieutenant, William C. Whittle; Master, John H. Ingram; Surgeon, John L. Ancrum; Paymaster, Richard Taylor; Chief Engineer, James Hood;
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